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Modem Locks UP XP

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August 13, 2004 9:58:21 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I have a Dell Dimension 4550 running windows XP. I
connect to the internet using AOL diaup. A few days ago I
noticed that the computer would lock up (not respond to
any commands including <ctl-alt-dlt>) when it was trying
to dial. Subsequent analysis indicated that anytime that
the computer would try to access the installed modem
(troubleshooting wizard, etc...) that the computer would
lock up. Now my bright idea was to remove the modem from
the Windows Control Panel and reboot to see if this would
fix it. After rebooting the windows hardware auto detect
feature finds the new modem and then immediately locks up
the computer just after logging on. So now the computer
is totally frozen. The modem in question is a BCM V.92
which I think is an internal soft modem. We have had many
recent storms and it is possible that lightning fried this
one. What should I do? If I need to replace it or
disable it could you direct me to some instructions?

Some extra information: There are 3 ports for phone line
connections. 1 near the middle of the case near some USB
ports and 2 together nearer the bottom. Upon opening the
case I noticed that the 1 near the top is attached to a
module that connects directly to the motherboard. The 2
near the bottom are attached to a card that is connected
to the motherboard via a jumper wire. I tried
disconnecting the jumper wire on the bottom card without
any success. So I assume that the problem in question is
with the upper module attached directly to the
motherboard. What is the bottom card with the 2 phone
jacks, another modem?

More about : modem locks

Anonymous
August 13, 2004 10:39:18 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

>-----Original Message-----
>I have a Dell Dimension 4550 running windows XP. I
>connect to the internet using AOL diaup. A few days ago
I
>noticed that the computer would lock up (not respond to
>any commands including <ctl-alt-dlt>) when it was trying
>to dial. Subsequent analysis indicated that anytime that
>the computer would try to access the installed modem
>(troubleshooting wizard, etc...) that the computer would
>lock up. Now my bright idea was to remove the modem from
>the Windows Control Panel and reboot to see if this would
>fix it. After rebooting the windows hardware auto detect
>feature finds the new modem and then immediately locks up
>the computer just after logging on. So now the computer
>is totally frozen. The modem in question is a BCM V.92
>which I think is an internal soft modem. We have had
many
>recent storms and it is possible that lightning fried
this
>one. What should I do? If I need to replace it or
>disable it could you direct me to some instructions?
>
>Some extra information: There are 3 ports for phone line
>connections. 1 near the middle of the case near some USB
>ports and 2 together nearer the bottom. Upon opening the
>case I noticed that the 1 near the top is attached to a
>module that connects directly to the motherboard. The 2
>near the bottom are attached to a card that is connected
>to the motherboard via a jumper wire. I tried
>disconnecting the jumper wire on the bottom card without
>any success. So I assume that the problem in question is
>with the upper module attached directly to the
>motherboard. What is the bottom card with the 2 phone
>jacks, another modem?
>

Thus far, what has prevented you from referring to the
computer documentation in order to identify the ports?
There are not 3 phone connections. The one by itself is
a NIC (network interface)connection. The one with two ports
is the modem. One port is connected to the phone line and
the other may be used to connect a telephone. Make sure
you have them straight.

For the main problem, it appears that either your modem
is bad, or there is a conflict. Try doing a system restore
to a point prior to when the problem started. If that
doesn't work, boot into safe mode and see if you can
test the modem from there. The answer may not be self-
evident; a while back I saw a situation where an Nvidia
desktop applet was causing a computer to reboot every
time the modem was invoked.
August 13, 2004 10:56:47 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I don't seem to have any documentation for this computer
that explain what the ports are, but thanks for the
enlightenment. I'll try what you suggested. Why though
when I disconnected the jumper to the one with the 2 ports
(i.e. the modem) did Windows still detect it?
>-----Original Message-----
>
>>-----Original Message-----
>>I have a Dell Dimension 4550 running windows XP. I
>>connect to the internet using AOL diaup. A few days ago
>I
>>noticed that the computer would lock up (not respond to
>>any commands including <ctl-alt-dlt>) when it was trying
>>to dial. Subsequent analysis indicated that anytime
that
>>the computer would try to access the installed modem
>>(troubleshooting wizard, etc...) that the computer
would
>>lock up. Now my bright idea was to remove the modem
from
>>the Windows Control Panel and reboot to see if this
would
>>fix it. After rebooting the windows hardware auto
detect
>>feature finds the new modem and then immediately locks
up
>>the computer just after logging on. So now the computer
>>is totally frozen. The modem in question is a BCM V.92
>>which I think is an internal soft modem. We have had
>many
>>recent storms and it is possible that lightning fried
>this
>>one. What should I do? If I need to replace it or
>>disable it could you direct me to some instructions?
>>
>>Some extra information: There are 3 ports for phone
line
>>connections. 1 near the middle of the case near some
USB
>>ports and 2 together nearer the bottom. Upon opening
the
>>case I noticed that the 1 near the top is attached to a
>>module that connects directly to the motherboard. The 2
>>near the bottom are attached to a card that is connected
>>to the motherboard via a jumper wire. I tried
>>disconnecting the jumper wire on the bottom card without
>>any success. So I assume that the problem in question
is
>>with the upper module attached directly to the
>>motherboard. What is the bottom card with the 2 phone
>>jacks, another modem?
>>
>
>Thus far, what has prevented you from referring to the
>computer documentation in order to identify the ports?
>There are not 3 phone connections. The one by itself is
>a NIC (network interface)connection. The one with two
ports
>is the modem. One port is connected to the phone line and
>the other may be used to connect a telephone. Make sure
>you have them straight.
>
>For the main problem, it appears that either your modem
>is bad, or there is a conflict. Try doing a system restore
>to a point prior to when the problem started. If that
>doesn't work, boot into safe mode and see if you can
>test the modem from there. The answer may not be self-
>evident; a while back I saw a situation where an Nvidia
>desktop applet was causing a computer to reboot every
>time the modem was invoked.
>.
>
Related resources
Anonymous
August 13, 2004 11:13:31 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

>-----Original Message-----
>I don't seem to have any documentation for this computer
>that explain what the ports are, but thanks for the
>enlightenment. I'll try what you suggested. Why though
>when I disconnected the jumper to the one with the 2
ports
>(i.e. the modem) did Windows still detect it?


I don't know why there would be a lead between the modem
and the mobo unless it's some sort of audio connector. At
any rate, the modem will be enumerated and accessed via
the PCI bus, and the lead in question would have no
effect on whether the modem is recognized or not.

>>-----Original Message-----
>>
>>>-----Original Message-----
>>>I have a Dell Dimension 4550 running windows XP. I
>>>connect to the internet using AOL diaup. A few days
ago
>>I
>>>noticed that the computer would lock up (not respond to
>>>any commands including <ctl-alt-dlt>) when it was
trying
>>>to dial. Subsequent analysis indicated that anytime
>that
>>>the computer would try to access the installed modem
>>>(troubleshooting wizard, etc...) that the computer
>would
>>>lock up. Now my bright idea was to remove the modem
>from
>>>the Windows Control Panel and reboot to see if this
>would
>>>fix it. After rebooting the windows hardware auto
>detect
>>>feature finds the new modem and then immediately locks
>up
>>>the computer just after logging on. So now the
computer
>>>is totally frozen. The modem in question is a BCM V.92
>>>which I think is an internal soft modem. We have had
>>many
>>>recent storms and it is possible that lightning fried
>>this
>>>one. What should I do? If I need to replace it or
>>>disable it could you direct me to some instructions?
>>>
>>>Some extra information: There are 3 ports for phone
>line
>>>connections. 1 near the middle of the case near some
>USB
>>>ports and 2 together nearer the bottom. Upon opening
>the
>>>case I noticed that the 1 near the top is attached to a
>>>module that connects directly to the motherboard. The
2
>>>near the bottom are attached to a card that is
connected
>>>to the motherboard via a jumper wire. I tried
>>>disconnecting the jumper wire on the bottom card
without
>>>any success. So I assume that the problem in question
>is
>>>with the upper module attached directly to the
>>>motherboard. What is the bottom card with the 2 phone
>>>jacks, another modem?
>>>
>>
>>Thus far, what has prevented you from referring to the
>>computer documentation in order to identify the ports?
>>There are not 3 phone connections. The one by itself is
>>a NIC (network interface)connection. The one with two
>ports
>>is the modem. One port is connected to the phone line and
>>the other may be used to connect a telephone. Make sure
>>you have them straight.
>>
>>For the main problem, it appears that either your modem
>>is bad, or there is a conflict. Try doing a system
restore
>>to a point prior to when the problem started. If that
>>doesn't work, boot into safe mode and see if you can
>>test the modem from there. The answer may not be self-
>>evident; a while back I saw a situation where an Nvidia
>>desktop applet was causing a computer to reboot every
>>time the modem was invoked.
>>.
>>
>.
>
August 13, 2004 5:10:29 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Thanks for the help. I really appreciate it.
>-----Original Message-----
>
>>-----Original Message-----
>>I don't seem to have any documentation for this computer
>>that explain what the ports are, but thanks for the
>>enlightenment. I'll try what you suggested. Why though
>>when I disconnected the jumper to the one with the 2
>ports
>>(i.e. the modem) did Windows still detect it?
>
>
>I don't know why there would be a lead between the modem
>and the mobo unless it's some sort of audio connector. At
>any rate, the modem will be enumerated and accessed via
>the PCI bus, and the lead in question would have no
>effect on whether the modem is recognized or not.
>
>>>-----Original Message-----
>>>
>>>>-----Original Message-----
>>>>I have a Dell Dimension 4550 running windows XP. I
>>>>connect to the internet using AOL diaup. A few days
>ago
>>>I
>>>>noticed that the computer would lock up (not respond
to
>>>>any commands including <ctl-alt-dlt>) when it was
>trying
>>>>to dial. Subsequent analysis indicated that anytime
>>that
>>>>the computer would try to access the installed modem
>>>>(troubleshooting wizard, etc...) that the computer
>>would
>>>>lock up. Now my bright idea was to remove the modem
>>from
>>>>the Windows Control Panel and reboot to see if this
>>would
>>>>fix it. After rebooting the windows hardware auto
>>detect
>>>>feature finds the new modem and then immediately locks
>>up
>>>>the computer just after logging on. So now the
>computer
>>>>is totally frozen. The modem in question is a BCM
V.92
>>>>which I think is an internal soft modem. We have had
>>>many
>>>>recent storms and it is possible that lightning fried
>>>this
>>>>one. What should I do? If I need to replace it or
>>>>disable it could you direct me to some instructions?
>>>>
>>>>Some extra information: There are 3 ports for phone
>>line
>>>>connections. 1 near the middle of the case near some
>>USB
>>>>ports and 2 together nearer the bottom. Upon opening
>>the
>>>>case I noticed that the 1 near the top is attached to
a
>>>>module that connects directly to the motherboard. The
>2
>>>>near the bottom are attached to a card that is
>connected
>>>>to the motherboard via a jumper wire. I tried
>>>>disconnecting the jumper wire on the bottom card
>without
>>>>any success. So I assume that the problem in question
>>is
>>>>with the upper module attached directly to the
>>>>motherboard. What is the bottom card with the 2 phone
>>>>jacks, another modem?
>>>>
>>>
>>>Thus far, what has prevented you from referring to the
>>>computer documentation in order to identify the ports?
>>>There are not 3 phone connections. The one by itself is
>>>a NIC (network interface)connection. The one with two
>>ports
>>>is the modem. One port is connected to the phone line
and
>>>the other may be used to connect a telephone. Make sure
>>>you have them straight.
>>>
>>>For the main problem, it appears that either your modem
>>>is bad, or there is a conflict. Try doing a system
>restore
>>>to a point prior to when the problem started. If that
>>>doesn't work, boot into safe mode and see if you can
>>>test the modem from there. The answer may not be self-
>>>evident; a while back I saw a situation where an Nvidia
>>>desktop applet was causing a computer to reboot every
>>>time the modem was invoked.
>>>.
>>>
>>.
>>
>.
>
Anonymous
August 13, 2004 5:48:50 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

The lead that you see is most likely an audio connector for the voice
part of the modem. Many modems have this. I do have to ask, are you
sure the top one is a phone jack or is it slightly bigger. I am going to
take a guess that the top one is actually a RJ45 connection which is for
networking cable and is actually your LAN Card. Have you tried actually
unplugging the PCI Modem card (the one with the two ports) from the
motherbaord? You may want to try putting it in a different PCI slot and
see if that helps. You may be running into IRQ conflicts.

----
Nathan McNulty


Wislu Plethora wrote:
>>-----Original Message-----
>>I don't seem to have any documentation for this computer
>>that explain what the ports are, but thanks for the
>>enlightenment. I'll try what you suggested. Why though
>>when I disconnected the jumper to the one with the 2
>
> ports
>
>>(i.e. the modem) did Windows still detect it?
>
>
>
> I don't know why there would be a lead between the modem
> and the mobo unless it's some sort of audio connector. At
> any rate, the modem will be enumerated and accessed via
> the PCI bus, and the lead in question would have no
> effect on whether the modem is recognized or not.
>
>
>>>-----Original Message-----
>>>
>>>
>>>>-----Original Message-----
>>>>I have a Dell Dimension 4550 running windows XP. I
>>>>connect to the internet using AOL diaup. A few days
>
> ago
>
>>>I
>>>
>>>>noticed that the computer would lock up (not respond to
>>>>any commands including <ctl-alt-dlt>) when it was
>
> trying
>
>>>>to dial. Subsequent analysis indicated that anytime
>>
>>that
>>
>>>>the computer would try to access the installed modem
>>>>(troubleshooting wizard, etc...) that the computer
>>
>>would
>>
>>>>lock up. Now my bright idea was to remove the modem
>
>>from
>
>>>>the Windows Control Panel and reboot to see if this
>>
>>would
>>
>>>>fix it. After rebooting the windows hardware auto
>>
>>detect
>>
>>>>feature finds the new modem and then immediately locks
>>
>>up
>>
>>>>the computer just after logging on. So now the
>
> computer
>
>>>>is totally frozen. The modem in question is a BCM V.92
>>>>which I think is an internal soft modem. We have had
>>>
>>>many
>>>
>>>>recent storms and it is possible that lightning fried
>>>
>>>this
>>>
>>>>one. What should I do? If I need to replace it or
>>>>disable it could you direct me to some instructions?
>>>>
>>>>Some extra information: There are 3 ports for phone
>>
>>line
>>
>>>>connections. 1 near the middle of the case near some
>>
>>USB
>>
>>>>ports and 2 together nearer the bottom. Upon opening
>>
>>the
>>
>>>>case I noticed that the 1 near the top is attached to a
>>>>module that connects directly to the motherboard. The
>
> 2
>
>>>>near the bottom are attached to a card that is
>
> connected
>
>>>>to the motherboard via a jumper wire. I tried
>>>>disconnecting the jumper wire on the bottom card
>
> without
>
>>>>any success. So I assume that the problem in question
>>
>>is
>>
>>>>with the upper module attached directly to the
>>>>motherboard. What is the bottom card with the 2 phone
>>>>jacks, another modem?
>>>>
>>>
>>>Thus far, what has prevented you from referring to the
>>>computer documentation in order to identify the ports?
>>>There are not 3 phone connections. The one by itself is
>>>a NIC (network interface)connection. The one with two
>>
>>ports
>>
>>>is the modem. One port is connected to the phone line and
>>>the other may be used to connect a telephone. Make sure
>>>you have them straight.
>>>
>>>For the main problem, it appears that either your modem
>>>is bad, or there is a conflict. Try doing a system
>
> restore
>
>>>to a point prior to when the problem started. If that
>>>doesn't work, boot into safe mode and see if you can
>>>test the modem from there. The answer may not be self-
>>>evident; a while back I saw a situation where an Nvidia
>>>desktop applet was causing a computer to reboot every
>>>time the modem was invoked.
>>>.
>>>
>>
>>.
>>
!