PTGD1-LA mainboard manual and non-HP bios

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Anybody know where to find these, looked all over the Asus site without success.
Thanks for ant help
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More about ptgd1 mainboard manual bios
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <116orqbicnlhn32@news.supernews.com>, billiebobt <> wrote:

    > Anybody know where to find these, looked all over the Asus site
    > without success. Thanks for ant help

    When HP uses a board, the version is custom made for HP.

    In some cases, when Asus makes one of these OEM boards, they
    make a virtually identical version for retail as well. Those
    are the cases where messing around would be the most productive.

    Looking through the current Asus list of products, I don't see
    anything that matches the picture here. Your board is a microATX
    PCI-Express video board, but with no PCI-E x1 slots, only the
    x16 for the video card:

    http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=en&cc=us&docname=c00297771

    Let us say you grab the BIOS for a 915 board that uses DDR
    memory. You somehow manage to bypass the flasher check for
    the Asus product string. You flash in the Asus BIOS.

    If you were to do that, you might find some of the onboard
    peripherals (LAN, firewire) might stop working (as the new
    BIOS doesn't know how to enumerate them). If the motherboards
    differ in the definition of any special purpose GPIO signals
    (which are used to turn stuff on and off), there is no way
    of knowing what will happen.

    At the very least, if you want to turn your motherboard into
    a guinea pig, buy a BIOS Savior from ioss.com.tw (about $25),
    as that device gives you dual BIOS chips. You can then do
    as many experiments as you wish using one BIOS chip, and if
    any of the experiments fails, you simply flip the switch on
    the BIOS Savior, and run the original HP BIOS again.

    Yes, people have done the kind of brain surgery you are
    proposing before, but it helps a lot if the motherboards
    bear some resemblance to one another, from an architecture
    and implementation standpoint. Flashing the BIOS is not
    an insurmountable problem, but will be a challenge
    nonetheless.

    (For example, you could purchase a preprogrammed BIOS chip
    from badflash.com, but what BIOS image do you use to do the
    job ? If you are going to try this route, you will also need
    to make sure the size of the BIOS chip on the HP board is the
    same as the size of the BIOS image coming from the Asus board.
    An OEM board is likely to use a smaller flash chip than a
    regular Asus board, because that reduces the manufacturing cost
    by a bit, which makes the brain surgery yet more complicated.
    With LPC flash chips, this is probably not a big deal, and
    just requires that the flash chips used are big enough to
    hold either an Asus or an HP image.)

    If you want to see a datasheet for a flash chip, look at
    page 16 of this document. This product comes in several
    sizes, but this datasheet only shows two of them and how
    they differ in operation:

    http://www.pmcflash.com/resource_center/docs/Pm49FL002%2D004%20V1%2E4%2Epdf
    (from http://www.pmcflash.com/products/fwh.cfm)

    HTH,
    Paul
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    nospam@needed.com (Paul) wrote:
    >In article <116orqbicnlhn32@news.supernews.com>, billiebobt <> wrote:
    >
    >> Anybody know where to find these, looked all over the Asus site
    >> without success. Thanks for ant help
    >
    >When HP uses a board, the version is custom made for HP.
    >
    >In some cases, when Asus makes one of these OEM boards, they
    >make a virtually identical version for retail as well. Those
    >are the cases where messing around would be the most productive.
    >
    >Looking through the current Asus list of products, I don't see
    >anything that matches the picture here. Your board is a microATX
    >PCI-Express video board, but with no PCI-E x1 slots, only the
    >x16 for the video card:
    >
    >http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericDocument?lc=en&cc=us&docname=c00297771
    >
    >Let us say you grab the BIOS for a 915 board that uses DDR
    >memory. You somehow manage to bypass the flasher check for
    >the Asus product string. You flash in the Asus BIOS.
    >
    >If you were to do that, you might find some of the onboard
    >peripherals (LAN, firewire) might stop working (as the new
    >BIOS doesn't know how to enumerate them). If the motherboards
    >differ in the definition of any special purpose GPIO signals
    >(which are used to turn stuff on and off), there is no way
    >of knowing what will happen.
    >
    >At the very least, if you want to turn your motherboard into
    >a guinea pig, buy a BIOS Savior from ioss.com.tw (about $25),
    >as that device gives you dual BIOS chips. You can then do
    >as many experiments as you wish using one BIOS chip, and if
    >any of the experiments fails, you simply flip the switch on
    >the BIOS Savior, and run the original HP BIOS again.
    >
    >Yes, people have done the kind of brain surgery you are
    >proposing before, but it helps a lot if the motherboards
    >bear some resemblance to one another, from an architecture
    >and implementation standpoint. Flashing the BIOS is not
    >an insurmountable problem, but will be a challenge
    >nonetheless.
    >
    >(For example, you could purchase a preprogrammed BIOS chip
    >from badflash.com, but what BIOS image do you use to do the
    >job ? If you are going to try this route, you will also need
    >to make sure the size of the BIOS chip on the HP board is the
    >same as the size of the BIOS image coming from the Asus board.
    >An OEM board is likely to use a smaller flash chip than a
    >regular Asus board, because that reduces the manufacturing cost
    >by a bit, which makes the brain surgery yet more complicated.
    >With LPC flash chips, this is probably not a big deal, and
    >just requires that the flash chips used are big enough to
    >hold either an Asus or an HP image.)
    >
    >If you want to see a datasheet for a flash chip, look at
    >page 16 of this document. This product comes in several
    >sizes, but this datasheet only shows two of them and how
    >they differ in operation:
    >
    >http://www.pmcflash.com/resource_center/docs/Pm49FL002%2D004%20V1%2E4%2Epdf
    >(from http://www.pmcflash.com/products/fwh.cfm)
    >
    >HTH,
    > Paul

    Thanks Paul
    I appreciate the lengths you went to in your reply and maybe I need to rethink.
    Much obliged.
    Billie
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    It sounds like that motherboard was in an HP brand computer. In which case
    it was specifically made for HP as a PROPRIETARY HP motherboard, and is NOT
    supported at all by Asus.

    --
    DaveW


    <billiebobt> wrote in message news:116orqbicnlhn32@news.supernews.com...
    > Anybody know where to find these, looked all over the Asus site without
    > success.
    > Thanks for ant help
    >
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