System Failure - CPU Check

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Hi all. I have a one year old system I assembled myself using an ASUS
P4C-800E Deluxe and a P4 3.0Ghz processor. Today, while doing other things,
I noticed the screen go black. Figured it was the power save. When I moved
the mouse to use the computer the screen didn't come back up. After chasing
my tail for a couple minutes I turn the box off with the power supply switch
and turned it back on. Got a vocal POST message: "System Failure - CPU
Test". I opened the case and noticed that the CPU fan was not running. I
don't know if the fan failed and then the processor burned up, or if the
processor burned up and the fan failed. I had another fan and plugged it in
and it did not work either. The fan is Intel and came with the processor.
All other fans are working and, obviously, the onboard sound. Can't tell
much more.
Call ASUS and they said to get an RMA for the MB and send it back to be
tested. Haven't contacted Intel yet about the 3 year warranty.
Does anyone know whether the MB is damaged or defective?
Is it likely that the processor is history?
If I send the board back should I send the processor with it too? The
memory?
Any help or pointers on how best to go about repairing this system would be
greatly appreciated.
11 answers Last reply
More about system failure check
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Long before removing anything, one first determines what is
    and is not working with a multimeter as Paul had noted.
    Simply measure voltages on each wire (PSU to motherboard) and
    compare those numbers to voltages in the chart at:
    "I think my power supply is dead" in alt.comp.hardware on 5
    Feb 2004 at
    http://www.tinyurl.com/2musa

    Measuring takes but minutes. Immediately, you either have
    identified one of the many power supply 'system' components as
    good or bad. IOW you have eliminated suspects.

    As Paul also noted, Intel CPUs protect themselves. However
    the motherboard contains a voltage regulator. If that
    motherboard power supply has failed, then it could have
    damaged the CPU. Very remote, but another 'suspect'.

    Currently you don't even know if one of the peripherals has
    dragged down the system. However, based upon the few symptoms
    provided, the power supply 'system' (which includes more than
    just a power supply) is probably working just fine. But
    again, we don't know until you take those two minutes to
    record and report back those voltages.

    Yes, the numbers don't just say Go-Nogo. They also can
    provide more important information. Post them. Best to know
    which component is suspect before sending everything out for
    test. One multimeter; two minutes. Those numbers report far
    more than any symptoms so far posted.

    BP wrote:
    > Hi all. I have a one year old system I assembled myself using an ASUS
    > P4C-800E Deluxe and a P4 3.0Ghz processor. Today, while doing other things,
    > I noticed the screen go black. Figured it was the power save. When I moved
    > the mouse to use the computer the screen didn't come back up. After chasing
    > my tail for a couple minutes I turn the box off with the power supply switch
    > and turned it back on. Got a vocal POST message: "System Failure - CPU
    > Test". I opened the case and noticed that the CPU fan was not running. I
    > don't know if the fan failed and then the processor burned up, or if the
    > processor burned up and the fan failed. I had another fan and plugged it in
    > and it did not work either. The fan is Intel and came with the processor.
    > All other fans are working and, obviously, the onboard sound. Can't tell
    > much more.
    > Call ASUS and they said to get an RMA for the MB and send it back to be
    > tested. Haven't contacted Intel yet about the 3 year warranty.
    > Does anyone know whether the MB is damaged or defective?
    > Is it likely that the processor is history?
    > If I send the board back should I send the processor with it too? The
    > memory?
    > Any help or pointers on how best to go about repairing this system would be
    > greatly appreciated.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Hey, thanks to all who posted. I will do some tests tonight and post back
    when I have more info.

    "w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:427635AA.773F2930@hotmail.com...
    : Long before removing anything, one first determines what is
    : and is not working with a multimeter as Paul had noted.
    : Simply measure voltages on each wire (PSU to motherboard) and
    : compare those numbers to voltages in the chart at:
    : "I think my power supply is dead" in alt.comp.hardware on 5
    : Feb 2004 at
    : http://www.tinyurl.com/2musa
    :
    : Measuring takes but minutes. Immediately, you either have
    : identified one of the many power supply 'system' components as
    : good or bad. IOW you have eliminated suspects.
    :
    : As Paul also noted, Intel CPUs protect themselves. However
    : the motherboard contains a voltage regulator. If that
    : motherboard power supply has failed, then it could have
    : damaged the CPU. Very remote, but another 'suspect'.
    :
    : Currently you don't even know if one of the peripherals has
    : dragged down the system. However, based upon the few symptoms
    : provided, the power supply 'system' (which includes more than
    : just a power supply) is probably working just fine. But
    : again, we don't know until you take those two minutes to
    : record and report back those voltages.
    :
    : Yes, the numbers don't just say Go-Nogo. They also can
    : provide more important information. Post them. Best to know
    : which component is suspect before sending everything out for
    : test. One multimeter; two minutes. Those numbers report far
    : more than any symptoms so far posted.
    :
    : BP wrote:
    : > Hi all. I have a one year old system I assembled myself using an ASUS
    : > P4C-800E Deluxe and a P4 3.0Ghz processor. Today, while doing other
    things,
    : > I noticed the screen go black. Figured it was the power save. When I
    moved
    : > the mouse to use the computer the screen didn't come back up. After
    chasing
    : > my tail for a couple minutes I turn the box off with the power supply
    switch
    : > and turned it back on. Got a vocal POST message: "System Failure - CPU
    : > Test". I opened the case and noticed that the CPU fan was not running. I
    : > don't know if the fan failed and then the processor burned up, or if the
    : > processor burned up and the fan failed. I had another fan and plugged it
    in
    : > and it did not work either. The fan is Intel and came with the
    processor.
    : > All other fans are working and, obviously, the onboard sound. Can't tell
    : > much more.
    : > Call ASUS and they said to get an RMA for the MB and send it back to be
    : > tested. Haven't contacted Intel yet about the 3 year warranty.
    : > Does anyone know whether the MB is damaged or defective?
    : > Is it likely that the processor is history?
    : > If I send the board back should I send the processor with it too? The
    : > memory?
    : > Any help or pointers on how best to go about repairing this system would
    be
    : > greatly appreciated.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    >>In your description, you noted "Today, while doing other things,
    I noticed the screen go black...". Did you, perhaps, plug in a
    USB device to the computer, just before this chain of events ?
    There is an issue with all motherboards based on ICH4/ICH5/ICH5R
    Southbridge chips, where electrostatic discharge into a USB
    port, causes the Southbridge to go into latchup. That is where
    a phantom SCR forms inside the chip, when ESD exceeds the max
    current allowed on any input or output. In full latchup, the chip
    can get hot enough to burn, and you might notice visible damage
    to the Southbridge chip (and no, adding a heat sink to the
    Southbridge will not stop the phenomenon from happening,
    and neither would it have prevented device destruction). <<

    Paul -

    Do you have any more information you can share/point us to in regard to how
    to prevent this problem or know when it is occurring so that you can
    minimize damage? I am unfamiliar with the term "latchup." Is this
    something that would be reset if you were lucky enough to coincidentally
    power your PC off (hopefully before things burned up) or is it a "once the
    damage is done, the damage is done" type of thing?

    Thanks in advance,
    Doug
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <P%pde.3484$V01.1747@newsread1.news.atl.earthlink.net>, " -"
    <xvvvz@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > >>In your description, you noted "Today, while doing other things,
    > I noticed the screen go black...". Did you, perhaps, plug in a
    > USB device to the computer, just before this chain of events ?
    > There is an issue with all motherboards based on ICH4/ICH5/ICH5R
    > Southbridge chips, where electrostatic discharge into a USB
    > port, causes the Southbridge to go into latchup. That is where
    > a phantom SCR forms inside the chip, when ESD exceeds the max
    > current allowed on any input or output. In full latchup, the chip
    > can get hot enough to burn, and you might notice visible damage
    > to the Southbridge chip (and no, adding a heat sink to the
    > Southbridge will not stop the phenomenon from happening,
    > and neither would it have prevented device destruction). <<
    >
    > Paul -
    >
    > Do you have any more information you can share/point us to in regard to how
    > to prevent this problem or know when it is occurring so that you can
    > minimize damage? I am unfamiliar with the term "latchup." Is this
    > something that would be reset if you were lucky enough to coincidentally
    > power your PC off (hopefully before things burned up) or is it a "once the
    > damage is done, the damage is done" type of thing?
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    > Doug

    http://tw.giga-byte.com/Motherboard/Support/FAQ/FAQ_456.htm

    There are different levels of latchup. "Micro-latchup" involves
    a tiny portion of a circuit. The kind of latchup in the ICH5
    is the major kind, and device destruction would happen so quickly,
    I doubt you could reach the power switch in time to stop it.
    (Under a second ?) Only an electronic circuit designed to detect
    overloads would have a chance to limit damage, and that is not
    a normal design requirement for digital circuit design. (This is,
    after all, a chip fabrication error, and is not a normal behavior
    that can be planned for.)

    My recommended workaround goes further than what Gigabyte is
    recommending. One poster here claims he lost a motherboard
    by plugging a USB device into the rear motherboard USB connectors,
    and those connectors do have working ground shields. That
    tells me the Intel problem is much more severe than the
    Gigabyte web page above is suggesting.

    As a result, my current recommendation is to use a USB 2.0 PCI
    card. Do not connect to the Asus motherboard USB headers at all,
    and do not use the USB motherboard connectors on the back of
    the computer. That will reduce the exposure of those ports
    to static electricity to the maximal extent possible.

    Static discharge can work directly, or a static discharge in
    one conductor can induce energy into an adjacent conductor.
    That means, for these sensitive USB ports, we don't want any
    "antennas" on them, so the less wire connected to the USB
    headers/ports the better. The USB 2.0 PCI card should give you
    a good USB solution, without the same risk of a meltdown. One
    would hope the PCI card faceplate and its connection to the
    chassis, would form an effective path for dissipating a
    static discharge.

    ESD protection of ICs has come a long way while I've worked
    in the industry. Many devices get a 1001V or a 2001V ESD
    rating now, and in the beginning, you would not get nearly that
    much protection. In the case of the Intel Southbridge,
    some mistake must have been made in the protection
    structures for this to happen, either that or a layout mistake
    was made during the design. While the core of chips is laid
    out by automated tools, there are still design issues around
    the pad area of chips that are handled manually. The people
    who do that work are called "polygon pushers", as they can
    make manual changes to device structures. Some mistake
    or bad assumption must have been made in the pad area of
    the chip, in particular the D+ and D- signals on each of
    the eight USB ports.

    The worst ICs I've ever worked with, were destroyed while
    sliding down the inside of an ESD protection plastic tube!
    50% of the devices were destroyed before even making it
    to my ESD protected benchtop. Adding external clamp diodes
    to those chips, in fact, made the chips bulletproof, and
    the chips could then be safely handled and passed from person to
    person. So, there have been chips which are much worse
    than this Intel problem. The manufacturer of those
    devices I was using, admitted there was absolutely no
    protection from static on the devices.

    The worst transistors for static are insulated gate MOSFETs.
    Those ship with a steel spring wound around their legs, to keep
    all the signal leads at a common potential. You solder the
    transistor into the circuit board, then pull on the coil spring
    to remove it from the legs of the transistor. A transistor
    like that can have an ESD rating of only 30V, which is no
    protection at all. The best RS-232 transceiver chips,
    have a 15000V ESD rating. So, there is quite a range of
    static proofing in semiconductor devices.

    One thing that surprises me, is I don't actually see a stated
    ESD rating on Intel datasheets. Makes me wonder...

    You can see some mention of testing for static electricity
    protection here (near the bottom of the page). The
    "human body model" involves modelling a human as a capacitor
    charged to a high voltage. There are some cute HV probes you
    can get, that will deliver a zap to a piece of electronics
    hardware, and a company that does a thorough job of designing
    their electronics, would use this kind of testing to prevent
    sensitive designs from leaving the factory. I suppose
    most motherboard manufacturers would assume the chip maker
    had taken care of this detail.

    http://www.maxim-ic.com/appnotes.cfm/appnote_number/654

    HTH,
    Paul
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Thank, Paul!

    Doug
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    I had a local computer geek test everything for me. Results: Bad mainboard.
    Processor survived. Intel processor fan was dead. Power supply checked out
    good, memory survived.
    I've since found a number of message board threads concerning P4C800 boards
    burning out. I know these threads are skewed, but from the tone of the
    replies it seems that this is a very common problem. Ex:
    http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/topic/8069/?o=40
    Now I have real reservations about putting the (replacement) board back in
    my system. There were a number of suggestions on how to alter the board and
    the processor fan mount to solve the problem but doing that voids the
    warranty. What do you people think of all this?

    "BP" <Zpoweretal@110.neZt> wrote in message
    news:KuadnXQX1-hEyuvfRVn-pw@conversent.net...
    : Hey, thanks to all who posted. I will do some tests tonight and post back
    : when I have more info.
    :
    : "w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    : news:427635AA.773F2930@hotmail.com...
    : : Long before removing anything, one first determines what is
    : : and is not working with a multimeter as Paul had noted.
    : : Simply measure voltages on each wire (PSU to motherboard) and
    : : compare those numbers to voltages in the chart at:
    : : "I think my power supply is dead" in alt.comp.hardware on 5
    : : Feb 2004 at
    : : http://www.tinyurl.com/2musa
    : :
    : : Measuring takes but minutes. Immediately, you either have
    : : identified one of the many power supply 'system' components as
    : : good or bad. IOW you have eliminated suspects.
    : :
    : : As Paul also noted, Intel CPUs protect themselves. However
    : : the motherboard contains a voltage regulator. If that
    : : motherboard power supply has failed, then it could have
    : : damaged the CPU. Very remote, but another 'suspect'.
    : :
    : : Currently you don't even know if one of the peripherals has
    : : dragged down the system. However, based upon the few symptoms
    : : provided, the power supply 'system' (which includes more than
    : : just a power supply) is probably working just fine. But
    : : again, we don't know until you take those two minutes to
    : : record and report back those voltages.
    : :
    : : Yes, the numbers don't just say Go-Nogo. They also can
    : : provide more important information. Post them. Best to know
    : : which component is suspect before sending everything out for
    : : test. One multimeter; two minutes. Those numbers report far
    : : more than any symptoms so far posted.
    : :
    : : BP wrote:
    : : > Hi all. I have a one year old system I assembled myself using an ASUS
    : : > P4C-800E Deluxe and a P4 3.0Ghz processor. Today, while doing other
    : things,
    : : > I noticed the screen go black. Figured it was the power save. When I
    : moved
    : : > the mouse to use the computer the screen didn't come back up. After
    : chasing
    : : > my tail for a couple minutes I turn the box off with the power supply
    : switch
    : : > and turned it back on. Got a vocal POST message: "System Failure - CPU
    : : > Test". I opened the case and noticed that the CPU fan was not running.
    I
    : : > don't know if the fan failed and then the processor burned up, or if
    the
    : : > processor burned up and the fan failed. I had another fan and plugged
    it
    : in
    : : > and it did not work either. The fan is Intel and came with the
    : processor.
    : : > All other fans are working and, obviously, the onboard sound. Can't
    tell
    : : > much more.
    : : > Call ASUS and they said to get an RMA for the MB and send it back to
    be
    : : > tested. Haven't contacted Intel yet about the 3 year warranty.
    : : > Does anyone know whether the MB is damaged or defective?
    : : > Is it likely that the processor is history?
    : : > If I send the board back should I send the processor with it too? The
    : : > memory?
    : : > Any help or pointers on how best to go about repairing this system
    would
    : be
    : : > greatly appreciated.
    :
    :
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <E_idnXWx-bDkNOXfRVn-tQ@conversent.net>, "BP"
    <Zpoweretal@110.neZt> wrote:

    > I had a local computer geek test everything for me. Results: Bad mainboard.
    > Processor survived. Intel processor fan was dead. Power supply checked out
    > good, memory survived.
    > I've since found a number of message board threads concerning P4C800 boards
    > burning out. I know these threads are skewed, but from the tone of the
    > replies it seems that this is a very common problem. Ex:
    > http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/topic/8069/?o=40
    > Now I have real reservations about putting the (replacement) board back in
    > my system. There were a number of suggestions on how to alter the board and
    > the processor fan mount to solve the problem but doing that voids the
    > warranty. What do you people think of all this?
    >

    The only known problem I see in that thread, is the "solder
    blob" problem. That was supposed to be with the first few thousand
    of P4C800 Deluxe boards. I'm not aware of multiple Asus
    motherboard models being affected by a problem like that.
    I have read of isolated reports of Intel HSF fitting too
    tight on a motherboard, which is one reason I use a third
    party heatsink that screws down on my P4C800-E - using the
    screws, I get to control the retention force applied.

    The parts that have died in your computer kind of worry me.
    You lost a motherboard and an Intel fan. Both items are powered
    by +12V. Did you also lose a hard drive by chance ? It also
    uses +12V.

    I think my main concern would be with determining the true
    root cause of the failure. Use your senses to advantage -
    have a sniff at the PSU - is there a burnt smell, or was
    there a burnt smell around the time of failure ? I guess
    I'm worried that the PSU overvolted on the +12V and that
    is what killed the fan and the motherboard. Since any
    hard drive and CDROM are also powered by +12V, they could
    have been damaged as well.

    Have a careful look over the motherboard before you return it.
    Look at the front side and the back side. Use your nose
    again, sniff for any burnt smell. Look for leakage around
    the electrolytic capacitors (the tall cylinders with plastic
    sleeve on them). Examine any chips you can see, for signs
    of heat damage. Look for anything that is discolored.

    There are the occasional posts here, where a poster has
    repeated faults. If they don't identify the source of the
    failure, the same failure can happen over and over again.
    Several people, for example, have had multiple video card
    failures, and eventually the conclusion is, that the
    motherboard is killing them (presumably via the AGP I/O
    voltage regulator). It can take a long time to reach such
    a conclusion, and that is an example of a hidden fault that
    strikes a user multiple times. I've also read sad cases,
    where a bad processor kills a motheboard, and then the
    poster visits a friends house, to test the processor in
    the friends computer - kaboom, motherboard of the friend
    is now also dead.

    So, rather than being worried about how the replacement board
    will work, I'd be much more concerned about why the current
    board failed. It is much better to have a root cause figured
    out, because once that defective part is replaced, you can
    rest easy. If you cannot figure out what failed, the problem
    could strike again.

    I'm really curious why the hard drive didn't also fail, if
    this is a problem with the +12V. Did you get the power supply
    tested, via the use of a multimeter ? I would want to make
    sure the outputs are close to their nominal voltages.

    What is the quality of the AC power like in your neighbourhood ?
    Are there a lot of power outages, blinking of the lights,
    lightning strikes ? Could the root cause have been an electrical
    surge ? Did any light bulbs burn out in your room recently ?

    Depending on how conservative you are, you might consider
    changing the power supply, and mark the current supply with a
    big "X". Keep the old power supply around as a spare. If you
    can determine the real source of the problem, so much the
    better.

    HTH,
    Paul
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    The power supply is a Seasonic Super Tornado 400. It tested fine on all
    leads.
    The motherboard smells bad and gets quite hot when it is powered up. All
    other components a fine (HDD, CD, DVD, Lights, Fans).
    The power supply could be a problem, as always, but checks out normal when
    tested. Minor fluctuation between 115 and 117v.
    The repair shop installed an Intel board for me (dropped it off in the
    morning, picked it up in the evening, $100 labor). I needed the system back
    and running FAST. This was my best option considering all the contingencies.
    I'll decide what to do with the ASUS board when I get it back from RMA.
    The dead fan worries me too. If fan dies and chip overheats enough to burn
    the mainboard before the thermal switch cuts off the CPU? Do any boards have
    audio temperature alarms? Might be a good feature.
    All in all a very disturbing experience. I've got some very old boxes still
    working here. Not used to very expensive parts going bad.

    "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
    news:nospam-0405050905050001@192.168.1.178...
    : In article <E_idnXWx-bDkNOXfRVn-tQ@conversent.net>, "BP"
    : <Zpoweretal@110.neZt> wrote:
    :
    : > I had a local computer geek test everything for me. Results: Bad
    mainboard.
    : > Processor survived. Intel processor fan was dead. Power supply checked
    out
    : > good, memory survived.
    : > I've since found a number of message board threads concerning P4C800
    boards
    : > burning out. I know these threads are skewed, but from the tone of the
    : > replies it seems that this is a very common problem. Ex:
    : > http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/topic/8069/?o=40
    : > Now I have real reservations about putting the (replacement) board back
    in
    : > my system. There were a number of suggestions on how to alter the board
    and
    : > the processor fan mount to solve the problem but doing that voids the
    : > warranty. What do you people think of all this?
    : >
    :
    : The only known problem I see in that thread, is the "solder
    : blob" problem. That was supposed to be with the first few thousand
    : of P4C800 Deluxe boards. I'm not aware of multiple Asus
    : motherboard models being affected by a problem like that.
    : I have read of isolated reports of Intel HSF fitting too
    : tight on a motherboard, which is one reason I use a third
    : party heatsink that screws down on my P4C800-E - using the
    : screws, I get to control the retention force applied.
    :
    : The parts that have died in your computer kind of worry me.
    : You lost a motherboard and an Intel fan. Both items are powered
    : by +12V. Did you also lose a hard drive by chance ? It also
    : uses +12V.
    :
    : I think my main concern would be with determining the true
    : root cause of the failure. Use your senses to advantage -
    : have a sniff at the PSU - is there a burnt smell, or was
    : there a burnt smell around the time of failure ? I guess
    : I'm worried that the PSU overvolted on the +12V and that
    : is what killed the fan and the motherboard. Since any
    : hard drive and CDROM are also powered by +12V, they could
    : have been damaged as well.
    :
    : Have a careful look over the motherboard before you return it.
    : Look at the front side and the back side. Use your nose
    : again, sniff for any burnt smell. Look for leakage around
    : the electrolytic capacitors (the tall cylinders with plastic
    : sleeve on them). Examine any chips you can see, for signs
    : of heat damage. Look for anything that is discolored.
    :
    : There are the occasional posts here, where a poster has
    : repeated faults. If they don't identify the source of the
    : failure, the same failure can happen over and over again.
    : Several people, for example, have had multiple video card
    : failures, and eventually the conclusion is, that the
    : motherboard is killing them (presumably via the AGP I/O
    : voltage regulator). It can take a long time to reach such
    : a conclusion, and that is an example of a hidden fault that
    : strikes a user multiple times. I've also read sad cases,
    : where a bad processor kills a motheboard, and then the
    : poster visits a friends house, to test the processor in
    : the friends computer - kaboom, motherboard of the friend
    : is now also dead.
    :
    : So, rather than being worried about how the replacement board
    : will work, I'd be much more concerned about why the current
    : board failed. It is much better to have a root cause figured
    : out, because once that defective part is replaced, you can
    : rest easy. If you cannot figure out what failed, the problem
    : could strike again.
    :
    : I'm really curious why the hard drive didn't also fail, if
    : this is a problem with the +12V. Did you get the power supply
    : tested, via the use of a multimeter ? I would want to make
    : sure the outputs are close to their nominal voltages.
    :
    : What is the quality of the AC power like in your neighbourhood ?
    : Are there a lot of power outages, blinking of the lights,
    : lightning strikes ? Could the root cause have been an electrical
    : surge ? Did any light bulbs burn out in your room recently ?
    :
    : Depending on how conservative you are, you might consider
    : changing the power supply, and mark the current supply with a
    : big "X". Keep the old power supply around as a spare. If you
    : can determine the real source of the problem, so much the
    : better.
    :
    : HTH,
    : Paul
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    All computer power supplies (of minimally acceptable
    behavior) must work just fine and startup with with a 100%
    load when AC mains voltage drops even to 90 volts. IOW AC
    line voltage should not be on your list of potential
    problems. Seasonic tends to be an honest brand since they
    typically claim to meet such requirements ... in writing.

    BP wrote:
    > The power supply is a Seasonic Super Tornado 400. It tested fine on all
    > leads.
    > The motherboard smells bad and gets quite hot when it is powered up. All
    > other components a fine (HDD, CD, DVD, Lights, Fans).
    > The power supply could be a problem, as always, but checks out normal when
    > tested. Minor fluctuation between 115 and 117v.
    > The repair shop installed an Intel board for me (dropped it off in the
    > morning, picked it up in the evening, $100 labor). I needed the system back
    > and running FAST. This was my best option considering all the contingencies.
    > I'll decide what to do with the ASUS board when I get it back from RMA.
    > The dead fan worries me too. If fan dies and chip overheats enough to burn
    > the mainboard before the thermal switch cuts off the CPU? Do any boards have
    > audio temperature alarms? Might be a good feature.
    > All in all a very disturbing experience. I've got some very old boxes still
    > working here. Not used to very expensive parts going bad.
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <x9GdnYJMY7C_wOTfRVn-1g@conversent.net>, "BP"
    <Zpoweretal@110.neZt> wrote:

    > The power supply is a Seasonic Super Tornado 400. It tested fine on all
    > leads.
    > The motherboard smells bad and gets quite hot when it is powered up. All
    > other components a fine (HDD, CD, DVD, Lights, Fans).
    > The power supply could be a problem, as always, but checks out normal when
    > tested. Minor fluctuation between 115 and 117v.
    > The repair shop installed an Intel board for me (dropped it off in the
    > morning, picked it up in the evening, $100 labor). I needed the system back
    > and running FAST. This was my best option considering all the contingencies.
    > I'll decide what to do with the ASUS board when I get it back from RMA.
    > The dead fan worries me too. If fan dies and chip overheats enough to burn
    > the mainboard before the thermal switch cuts off the CPU? Do any boards have
    > audio temperature alarms? Might be a good feature.
    > All in all a very disturbing experience. I've got some very old boxes still
    > working here. Not used to very expensive parts going bad.
    >

    As I explained in the first posting, the processor sends a signal
    when the die reaches 135C. That only needs to be connected into
    the power switch logic, to allow turning off the computer in the
    event the processor overheats. Your motherboard also has a hardware
    monitor that reads the tachometer lead from the CPU fan. With the
    right software, you can be alerted whenever a tachometer equipped
    fan fails. Many computer case fans don't have a tacho lead, so it
    takes some effort to get all the fans in the computer to be
    monitored.

    As for detecting overheats, there are just too many things that
    could overheat and burn. For example, on one of the forums, there
    was a picture of a motherboard, where the area all around the
    processor socket was charred. That was caused by a copper plane
    fault on the Vcore voltage, which causes the Vcore regulator to
    "cook" all the copper around the processor. Truly impressive
    looking.

    Have you tested the fan on another fan header somewhere ?
    If the fan is working, then all that has happened, is a
    motherboard died. Think, for a moment, about how "dumb"
    a fan is, and how hard it would be to kill. Its biggest
    exposure is mechanical (bearing failure or blade scraping
    the fan body), not electrical. But, if the +12V were to go
    high enough, that would cook it. The tachometer lead is a
    second path to the fan, but there is a buffer transistor
    in that path, and it would be difficult to stop the rest
    of the fan that way. If the fan is dead, and the bearings
    were not showing any signs of a problem before this happened,
    I would still be curious as to what happened.

    Paul
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Yes, I need to discover the cause of the fan's demise, and I will get to
    that once I've got my business back up and running (almost done, couldn't
    get network to hook up until I killed the ghosts in the machine). It doesn't
    run on any header. According to my BIOS readings, my 12v is good, my 5v is
    good, but since the event my 1.5v reads 1.43. Could be the BIOS. My
    multitester was reading 1.5+ when I tested it way back. I don't expect to
    get a report back from ASUS, so I guess I will never know what happened to
    the board. It shows no physical damage.

    "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
    news:nospam-0505052202440001@192.168.1.178...
    > In article <x9GdnYJMY7C_wOTfRVn-1g@conversent.net>, "BP"
    > <Zpoweretal@110.neZt> wrote:
    >
    >> The power supply is a Seasonic Super Tornado 400. It tested fine on all
    >> leads.
    >> The motherboard smells bad and gets quite hot when it is powered up. All
    >> other components a fine (HDD, CD, DVD, Lights, Fans).
    >> The power supply could be a problem, as always, but checks out normal
    >> when
    >> tested. Minor fluctuation between 115 and 117v.
    >> The repair shop installed an Intel board for me (dropped it off in the
    >> morning, picked it up in the evening, $100 labor). I needed the system
    >> back
    >> and running FAST. This was my best option considering all the
    >> contingencies.
    >> I'll decide what to do with the ASUS board when I get it back from RMA.
    >> The dead fan worries me too. If fan dies and chip overheats enough to
    >> burn
    >> the mainboard before the thermal switch cuts off the CPU? Do any boards
    >> have
    >> audio temperature alarms? Might be a good feature.
    >> All in all a very disturbing experience. I've got some very old boxes
    >> still
    >> working here. Not used to very expensive parts going bad.
    >>
    >
    > As I explained in the first posting, the processor sends a signal
    > when the die reaches 135C. That only needs to be connected into
    > the power switch logic, to allow turning off the computer in the
    > event the processor overheats. Your motherboard also has a hardware
    > monitor that reads the tachometer lead from the CPU fan. With the
    > right software, you can be alerted whenever a tachometer equipped
    > fan fails. Many computer case fans don't have a tacho lead, so it
    > takes some effort to get all the fans in the computer to be
    > monitored.
    >
    > As for detecting overheats, there are just too many things that
    > could overheat and burn. For example, on one of the forums, there
    > was a picture of a motherboard, where the area all around the
    > processor socket was charred. That was caused by a copper plane
    > fault on the Vcore voltage, which causes the Vcore regulator to
    > "cook" all the copper around the processor. Truly impressive
    > looking.
    >
    > Have you tested the fan on another fan header somewhere ?
    > If the fan is working, then all that has happened, is a
    > motherboard died. Think, for a moment, about how "dumb"
    > a fan is, and how hard it would be to kill. Its biggest
    > exposure is mechanical (bearing failure or blade scraping
    > the fan body), not electrical. But, if the +12V were to go
    > high enough, that would cook it. The tachometer lead is a
    > second path to the fan, but there is a buffer transistor
    > in that path, and it would be difficult to stop the rest
    > of the fan that way. If the fan is dead, and the bearings
    > were not showing any signs of a problem before this happened,
    > I would still be curious as to what happened.
    >
    > Paul
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