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Major benefits of Windows 7?

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February 20, 2009 4:18:24 PM

Hi there,

I switched to Windows 7 beta a couple of weeks ago.
So far I am not impressed.
I like very much the ability to shift the location of the different icons in the taskbar.
But other than that I do not see a lot of major improvements.
What are the main advantages you think Windows 7 bring to the table?

I might have missed some...

Thanks!

More about : major benefits windows

a b $ Windows 7
February 20, 2009 9:58:40 PM

The big one is speed, but overall, it just feels more natural than Vista or XP to me. It's hard to describe exactly what it is, but after using 7 for a while on my laptop, my desktop just doesn't feel quite as smooth or intuitive. It also added a solid 20-30min to the battery life of my laptop compared to vista.
February 20, 2009 11:00:54 PM

Major benefit to Windows 7 is that it allows you to use your hardware for something other than bios post watching........

minor benefits include - it's going to be supported for a while, not like XP (which I'm gonna miss) and the ability to load your favorite...um...what is your favorite?

/edit - yes, it's called sarcasm. happen to have it in supply, kinda overstocked - gotta move it out while it's here.
Related resources
a b $ Windows 7
February 20, 2009 11:05:57 PM

Biggest is speed & response. On my test systems (All of them have more than 4GB RAM) Win 7 x64 uses RAM much better/less than Vista x64.
February 21, 2009 10:45:27 AM

cjl said:
The big one is speed, but overall, it just feels more natural than Vista or XP to me. It's hard to describe exactly what it is, but after using 7 for a while on my laptop, my desktop just doesn't feel quite as smooth or intuitive. It also added a solid 20-30min to the battery life of my laptop compared to vista.

Nice reply - I like the battery life advantage :) 
February 24, 2009 1:13:30 AM

There is no difference, it's a repackaged Vista!
February 24, 2009 12:35:48 PM

I'm no expert so I have no idea how an operating system would effect power use in your laptop, so I wouldn't even try to address that. But I did a clean install of Windows 7 64 bit on a spare drive. I have a hot swap cage in my desktop computer. I pulled my Vista Ulitmate 64 bit drive out and put in the drive with 7 installed and I see no increase in bootup speeds over Vista. I have yet to try any games on 7 to see if it benifits them. But so far I agree its just a repackaged Vista, but that is still just my first impression.
a b $ Windows 7
February 24, 2009 5:14:02 PM

http://www.winsupersite.com/win7/ff.asp

Quote:

Accessibility improvements. Microsoft has revamped the accessibility features in Windows 7 with improved speech recognition and a new Magnifier utility with full-screen and lens-mode views.

Action Center. While previous versions of Windows included a feature called Windows Security Center that monitored the various security features of the system, Windows 7 takes this functionality to the next level with Action Center. In addition to monitoring security, Action Center also monitors the OS's maintenance features and consolidates alerts from numerous Windows features into a single interface.

Aero Peek. This replacement for Show Desktop in Windows 7 lets you "peek" behind all of the open windows on your desktop and easily view and Windows Gadgets or files on your desktop. You can also peek into the contents of specific open windows.

Aero Snaps. By dragging open windows in certain ways, you can "snap" them to the edges of the screen, maximize, or minimize. This obviates the need to click tiny onscreen elements, making these features more accessible to users.

Backup and Restore. Windows Vista's stellar backup and restore features have been streamlined and simplified in Windows 7. Like its predecessor, Windows 7 supports both data backup and image-based system backup, but now the UIs are more segregated.

Bitlocker To Go. The full-drive encryption feature that first debuted in Windows Vista has been updated in Windows 7 to support removable USB storage devices like flash memory drives and portable hard drives.

Blu-Ray support. Windows 7 natively supports Blu-Ray optical discs and enables you to write to Blu-Ray recordable media.

Calculator. The Windows Calculator utility inexplicably receives a major upgrade in Windows 7 with calculation history, unit conversion, calculation templates, data calculations, and other new features.

Device Stage. This Longhorn-style user experience will be made available for multi-function devices such as smart phones, multifunction printers, portable media players, and the like. Through this UI, you'll be able to access the features that are unique to each device. Each Device Stage page can be extensively customized by the device maker.

Devices and Printers. This activity center provides a central location for interacting with any hardware devices--digital cameras, mice, displays, keyboards, and the like--that may be attached to your PC.

DirectAccess. This feature is aimed at business users who need to securely access corporate network resources while away from the office. Essentially a simple replacement for VPN connections, DirectAccess requires Windows Server 2008 R2 on the server-side.

DirectX 11. Windows 7 includes the latest version of the DirectX multimedia libraries.

Display improvements. Windows 7 includes numerous improvements related to computer displays, including integrated display color calibration, improved high DPI support, ClearType, and improved support for external displays. A new Windows Key + P keyboard shortcut helps you easily switch between connected displays.

Getting Started. This replacement for Windows Vista's Welcome Center no longer appears the first time you boot into the Windows desktop, but it still provides a central location for discovering new features, personalizing the system, transferring data from your previous Windows PC, and discovering and launching other common tasks.

HomeGroup. Microsoft has consolidated the most common network-based sharing tasks into a single simple interface called HomeGroup. Computers in a HomeGroup can easily share documents, digital media files, and printers over a home network.

Internet Explorer. Windows 7 ships with the latest version of Microsoft's Web browser, Internet Explorer 8.

Libraries. In Windows 7, Microsoft has realized a long-term goal to replace the static special shell folders from previous Windows versions and replace them with virtualized shell locations that aggregate content from a variety of physical locations. Libraries are implemented as virtual folders and the views they present are the results of search queries. Libraries are also the basis for HomeGroup file and digital media content sharing.

Location-Aware Printing. Windows 7 utilizes different default printers for each of the network locations you've configured on the system so you won't mistakenly print a child's school project to the work printer. When you're at work, you'll print to the work printer, and when you're at home, you'll print to the home printer.

MinWin. The componentized core of Windows 7, which includes both the traditional operating system kernel as well as the minimum necessary surrounding support technologies to create a bootable (and, for Microsoft, testable) system. Note that, in Windows 7, MinWin isn't a feature per se but is rather the foundation upon which the rest of the OS is built.

Paint. The Paint utility that's been in Windows from the very first version receives its first significant upgrade in decades, and now sports the new Scenic Ribbon toolbar.

Parental Controls. The parental control functionality that debuted in Windows Vista is updated in Windows 7 to support multiple games rating systems and parental control providers.

Power Config. Windows 7 includes a new Power Config utility that provides reports identifying problems, settings, applications, and other things that may be reducing the power efficiency of your PC.

Problem Steps Recorder. Windows 7 includes a new utility called the Problem Steps Recorder that captures screen shots of the steps a user is taking so that help desk personnel can provide a fix without physically having to visit the desktop.

ReadyBoost. ReadyBoost first appeared in Windows Vista, providing users with a way to cheaply and easily improve the performance of their PCs by utilizing a USB memory key as a memory cache. In Windows 7, ReadyBoost is improved in numerous way: It supports multiple memory devices, can work with USB memory keys, Secure Digital (SD) memory cards, and other internal flash devices, and supports over 4 GB of storage.

Scenic Ribbon. Microsoft has evolved the Ribbon toolbar from Office 2007 and made it part of the operating system in Windows 7. This new version of the Ribbon, called the scenic Ribbon, is used by two Windows 7 applications, Paint and WordPad, and can be used by third party applications going forward as well.

Sensor support. Windows 7 includes support for hardware-based sensors, including GPS-based location sensors.

Start Menu (Enhanced). The Windows 7 Start Menu is an enhanced version of the Start Menu that debuted in Windows Vista.

Startup Repair. While this useful tool did debut with Windows Vista, it wasn't installed on PCs by default. In Windows 7, it is installed into the OS partition automatically and appears automatically when the system can't boot properly, fixing any problems and returning the system to its normal booting state.

Sticky Notes. The Sticky Notes utility loses the bizarre Windows XP-style interface from previous Windows versions and supports ink and text input.

Styles. In Windows 7, Microsoft combines various system preferences--including the desktop background, the Aero glass window color, the system sounds, and the screen saver--into styles you can customize, save, and share with others.

System Restore. The Windows 7 version of System Restore works as before, providing a way to non-destructively return a PC to a previous point in time, but is more reliable, predictable, and effective than its predecessors.

Tablet PC. After making Tablet PC functionality available more broadly in Windows Vista, Microsoft is improving this technology in Windows 7 with better handwriting recognition that has improved accuracy, speed, and support for math expressions, personalized custom dictionaries, and 13 new languages.

User Account Control. While much reviled by certain users, the User Account Control (UAC) feature that debuted in Windows Vista played a huge role in making that system the most secure Windows version yet. In Windows 7, UAC is extensively updated to be less annoying, and the overall system has been fine-tuned to minimize the number of UAC prompts that interrupt users.

View Available Networks. Windows 7 includes a new Jump List-based utility for finding and connecting to Wi-Fi, mobile broadband, dial-up, and VPN connections. Unlike the similar UI in Windows Vista, this utility, called View Available Networks, does not require you to navigate through a series of dialogs and windows.

Virtual Hard Disk support. Windows 7 allows you to mount a Virtual Hard Disk (VHD) as a drive in Explorer so that you can navigate its contents like a physical hard disk. It also supports the ability to boot from VHD images.

VPN Reconnect. Windows 7 users who still need to make traditional VPN connections will benefit from a new VPN Reconnect feature that automatically reestablishes a VPN connection when you temporarily lose Internet connectivity.

Windows Anytime Upgrade. This utility debuted in Windows Vista but was found to be too confusing for most users, so the electronic upgrade capability was removed. In Windows 7, Windows Anytime Upgrade returns to electronic upgrading and Microsoft promises you'll be able to upgrade from one version of Windows 7 to another in about 10 minutes now.

Windows Defender. The malware and spyware protection utility from Windows Vista continues in Windows 7 with a few changes: It's been integrated into the new Action Center and its centralized notification system. But Defender also drops the useful Software Explorer feature, so users will have to look elsewhere for a way to prevent unwanted applications from running a startup.

Windows Easy Transfer. The Windows Easy Transfer utility that debuted in Windows Vista has been substantially updated with a new user interface and new capabilities. As before, Easy Transfer helps you transfer files, folders, and program and system settings from your previous Windows install to your new one. This time around, however, the process is simpler and more streamlined.

Windows Explorer. Microsoft has significantly updated Windows Explorer yet again in Windows 7, this time with a new toolbar, a resizable search box, and a new navigational pane.

Windows Gadgets. The Windows Sidebar disappears in Windows 7, but the Gadgets continue on and are integrated with the desktop.

Windows Live. Windows 7 integrates with a growing collection of Windows Live services, including Windows Live Photos, Windows Live Profile, Windows Live People, Windows Live Spaces, Windows Live Home, Windows Live SkyDrive, Windows Live Groups, Windows Live Calendar, Windows Live Events, Windows Live Hotmail, and more.

Windows Live Essentials. Available as an optional download, Windows Live Essentials is an application suite that includes a number of new versions of classic Windows applications, including Windows Live Mail (email and calendar), Windows Live Photo Gallery (photos), Windows Live Messenger (instant messaging), Windows Live Movie Maker (video editing), Windows Live Family Safety (enhanced parental controls), and more.

Windows Media Center. Microsoft's ten-foot UI for digital media content is improved with a slightly enhanced user interface, multi-touch support, HomeGroup integration, and various global broadcast TV standards.

Windows Media Player. Microsoft's media player received a major makeover in Windows 7 with several new features, including enhanced DVD playback, a new lightweight playback mode, dramatically improved format compatibility (including AAC and H.264), Windows Taskbar Jump List customization, PC-to-PC and media streaming, and a new Play To feature.

Windows PowerShell. Windows 7 ships with the Windows PowerShell 2.0 scripting environment and the Windows PowerShell Integrated Scripting Environment (ISE).

Windows Search. Windows 7 comes with the latest version of Windows Search, and unlike the version that first shipped with Windows Vista, you can now obtain instant search results from network-based file shares as well as local hard drives. Microsoft has also improved the performance of local searches, sorting, and grouping.

Windows Taskbar (Enhanced). The Windows Taskbar has been dramatically enhanced in Windows 7 to minimize clutter. New Taskbar features like Jump Lists, fly-over and full-screen icon previews, and more.

Windows Touch. Windows 7 builds on the Tablet PC and touch capabilities from previous Windows versions and adds pervasive support for multi-touch. All of the major UI components, including the Start Menu, Windows Taskbar, and Explorer, are touch-friendly in Windows 7.

Windows Troubleshooting. This new Windows 7 feature diagnoses and resolves common operating system and hardware issues. It works automatically, or you can visit the Troubleshooting control panel to find problems to troubleshoot. Windows Troubleshooting integrates with Action Center so you'll be notified when relevant new troubleshooters from Microsoft and third parties are made available.

Windows Update. Microsoft's utility for downloading and installing system updates has been enhanced in Windows 7 to take advantage of changes in the security model and to better expose optional and featured updates.

Wireless Device Network. Finally, Windows gains a way to use your wireless-equipped laptop as a wireless access point for other PCs when you're connected to a wired network.

WordPad. The simple word processor continues into Windows 7 with the new Scenic Ribbon UI and several editing improvements.

XPS Viewer. While Windows Vista users are forced to use Internet Explorer to view XML Paper Specification (XPS) documents--essentially Microsoft's PDF knock-off--Windows 7 gains a dedicated XPS Viewer application.


a b $ Windows 7
February 24, 2009 5:31:22 PM

M$ has a much improved 'BETA tester' network these days. When Windows XP was released it took until SP2 to get a Security Center. The five people used as BETA testers were ignorant of the 27,356 instances of virus and spyware present on their machines. M$ engineers blew them off as nOObs and XP haters. Dude.
February 24, 2009 10:27:22 PM

cjl said:
Explain the battery life.

I was being sarcastic. In any case, while there are differences, it is not like going from XP to Vista. I think it was a good move, but I certainly hope the next Windows is not built on the same kernel but with more glass.
a b $ Windows 7
February 25, 2009 12:27:36 AM

I agree, it wasn't like the XP-Vista transition. I would argue though that XP-Vista was a more drastic transition than usual - look at 95-98, 98-2000, or even 2000-XP. None were as significant a change as XP-Vista was.
February 25, 2009 1:33:50 AM

I like a fresh new OS :D  Although the problem is it means years of bug-removal...
February 25, 2009 1:29:52 PM

I went back to Vista 64 bit. Other than the cool taskbar I see no benefit to upgrade at this time. New users will find the UI easier to navigate.

It doesn't boot faster for me. I ran gaming benchmarks and found that 7 does not perform as well as vista. This is most likely a ATI driver issue.

Many users will find it too pretty to resist.
February 28, 2009 2:26:26 AM

Thanks everyone for all your feedback, I have to admitt I get used to it.
Of course there are still a lot of bugs.
I will have to look into the battery like improvement...
February 28, 2009 3:02:36 AM

Ok here is the things I hate.

1. windows is a menu, I don't need/want a 10gb menu.
2. the network center still sucks. Sometimes you can still ping a dns name and get replies but still not surf the internet. How are you supposed to
support that.
3. I don't care about fancy neat looking themes. win2000 was fine.
4. Speed was touted in the press releases, and it is a tad faster than vista, but 2000 is still a lot faster.



The things I like:

puppy linux
ubuntu
Dos 5 with dosshell
novell 3.12
openoffice
staroffice
win2000 with nothing but sp4 added.

February 28, 2009 4:18:34 AM

techdeuce said:
3. I don't care about fancy neat looking themes. win2000 was fine.

But Joe Bloggs does. He gets wowed by glass.
February 28, 2009 12:53:11 PM

MS should have taken win2000 after it got stable at sp2 and started making it smaller and faster. You know, increasing the speed of the code and making it smaller. What they did now is take a computer of today that is 5-10 times faster (hardware wise) than the one that is 4 years older, add vista, now it is 2-3 times slower than the older computer is with XP or 2000. Doesn't make sense to buy it if it is slower. Do an experiment, see if you can put window 95 on a newish machine, see how fast it runs now? if you can get it to load. How about window 3.1?

Its like this. If I have a sports car with a fast engine, that car likes to go fast and I want to drive it faster. I want to put it in a race. As I make my race plans to change the car, instead of making improvements to the car for speed I took the body of the car off and gave it the body of a tour bus. Sure the bus is painted all fancy with OZZy pictures and its got a fancy water bed inside, but it sure ain't gonna win no races.
GIVE ME SOME REAL SPEED, not "SPEED" FROM THE PR dept.

As far as fancy goes however, it should be a widget. You could have the theme programmers as a seperate class of job. The graphic designers would have had another place to work on. Build the theme like a webpage as a whole seperate element to windows. Somone wants AERO? they could go download the aero theme from the APP STORE for WINDOWS for $2. Someone actually wants the firewall that MS has? get it at the APP store for $.50. Want to change your theme? just drag the widget for the new theme onto the desktop and it changes. ALL seperate functions. Dunno about you, it just makes some sense to me.

Sorry to junk up the OP's thread, I felt the need to rant. I didn't think vista or 7 were improvements on anything except 7 is somewhat faster than vista when you click to open an explorer window.
June 20, 2009 4:10:42 PM

Scotteq said:
http://www.winsupersite.com/win7/ff.asp

Quote:

Accessibility improvements. Microsoft has revamped the accessibility features in Windows 7 with improved speech recognition and a new Magnifier utility with full-screen and lens-mode views.

Action Center. While previous versions of Windows included a feature called Windows Security Center that monitored the various security features of the system, Windows 7 takes this functionality to the next level with Action Center. In addition to monitoring security, Action Center also monitors the OS's maintenance features and consolidates alerts from numerous Windows features into a single interface.

Aero Peek. This replacement for Show Desktop in Windows 7 lets you "peek" behind all of the open windows on your desktop and easily view and Windows Gadgets or files on your desktop. You can also peek into the contents of specific open windows.

Aero Snaps. By dragging open windows in certain ways, you can "snap" them to the edges of the screen, maximize, or minimize. This obviates the need to click tiny onscreen elements, making these features more accessible to users.

Backup and Restore. Windows Vista's stellar backup and restore features have been streamlined and simplified in Windows 7. Like its predecessor, Windows 7 supports both data backup and image-based system backup, but now the UIs are more segregated.


Bitlocker To Go. The full-drive encryption feature that first debuted in Windows Vista has been updated in Windows 7 to support removable USB storage devices like flash memory drives and portable hard drives.

Blu-Ray support. Windows 7 natively supports Blu-Ray optical discs and enables you to write to Blu-Ray recordable media.

Calculator. The Windows Calculator utility inexplicably receives a major upgrade in Windows 7 with calculation history, unit conversion, calculation templates, data calculations, and other new features.

Device Stage. This Longhorn-style user experience will be made available for multi-function devices such as smart phones, multifunction printers, portable media players, and the like. Through this UI, you'll be able to access the features that are unique to each device. Each Device Stage page can be extensively customized by the device maker.

Devices and Printers. This activity center provides a central location for interacting with any hardware devices--digital cameras, mice, displays, keyboards, and the like--that may be attached to your PC.

DirectAccess. This feature is aimed at business users who need to securely access corporate network resources while away from the office. Essentially a simple replacement for VPN connections, DirectAccess requires Windows Server 2008 R2 on the server-side.

DirectX 11. Windows 7 includes the latest version of the DirectX multimedia libraries.

Display improvements. Windows 7 includes numerous improvements related to computer displays, including integrated display color calibration, improved high DPI support, ClearType, and improved support for external displays. A new Windows Key + P keyboard shortcut helps you easily switch between connected displays.

Getting Started. This replacement for Windows Vista's Welcome Center no longer appears the first time you boot into the Windows desktop, but it still provides a central location for discovering new features, personalizing the system, transferring data from your previous Windows PC, and discovering and launching other common tasks.

HomeGroup. Microsoft has consolidated the most common network-based sharing tasks into a single simple interface called HomeGroup. Computers in a HomeGroup can easily share documents, digital media files, and printers over a home network.

Internet Explorer. Windows 7 ships with the latest version of Microsoft's Web browser, Internet Explorer 8.

Libraries. In Windows 7, Microsoft has realized a long-term goal to replace the static special shell folders from previous Windows versions and replace them with virtualized shell locations that aggregate content from a variety of physical locations. Libraries are implemented as virtual folders and the views they present are the results of search queries. Libraries are also the basis for HomeGroup file and digital media content sharing.

Location-Aware Printing. Windows 7 utilizes different default printers for each of the network locations you've configured on the system so you won't mistakenly print a child's school project to the work printer. When you're at work, you'll print to the work printer, and when you're at home, you'll print to the home printer.

MinWin. The componentized core of Windows 7, which includes both the traditional operating system kernel as well as the minimum necessary surrounding support technologies to create a bootable (and, for Microsoft, testable) system. Note that, in Windows 7, MinWin isn't a feature per se but is rather the foundation upon which the rest of the OS is built.

Paint. The Paint utility that's been in Windows from the very first version receives its first significant upgrade in decades, and now sports the new Scenic Ribbon toolbar.

Parental Controls. The parental control functionality that debuted in Windows Vista is updated in Windows 7 to support multiple games rating systems and parental control providers.

Power Config. Windows 7 includes a new Power Config utility that provides reports identifying problems, settings, applications, and other things that may be reducing the power efficiency of your PC.

Problem Steps Recorder. Windows 7 includes a new utility called the Problem Steps Recorder that captures screen shots of the steps a user is taking so that help desk personnel can provide a fix without physically having to visit the desktop.

ReadyBoost. ReadyBoost first appeared in Windows Vista, providing users with a way to cheaply and easily improve the performance of their PCs by utilizing a USB memory key as a memory cache. In Windows 7, ReadyBoost is improved in numerous way: It supports multiple memory devices, can work with USB memory keys, Secure Digital (SD) memory cards, and other internal flash devices, and supports over 4 GB of storage.

Scenic Ribbon. Microsoft has evolved the Ribbon toolbar from Office 2007 and made it part of the operating system in Windows 7. This new version of the Ribbon, called the scenic Ribbon, is used by two Windows 7 applications, Paint and WordPad, and can be used by third party applications going forward as well.

Sensor support. Windows 7 includes support for hardware-based sensors, including GPS-based location sensors.

Start Menu (Enhanced). The Windows 7 Start Menu is an enhanced version of the Start Menu that debuted in Windows Vista.

Startup Repair. While this useful tool did debut with Windows Vista, it wasn't installed on PCs by default. In Windows 7, it is installed into the OS partition automatically and appears automatically when the system can't boot properly, fixing any problems and returning the system to its normal booting state.

Sticky Notes. The Sticky Notes utility loses the bizarre Windows XP-style interface from previous Windows versions and supports ink and text input.

Styles. In Windows 7, Microsoft combines various system preferences--including the desktop background, the Aero glass window color, the system sounds, and the screen saver--into styles you can customize, save, and share with others.

System Restore. The Windows 7 version of System Restore works as before, providing a way to non-destructively return a PC to a previous point in time, but is more reliable, predictable, and effective than its predecessors.

Tablet PC. After making Tablet PC functionality available more broadly in Windows Vista, Microsoft is improving this technology in Windows 7 with better handwriting recognition that has improved accuracy, speed, and support for math expressions, personalized custom dictionaries, and 13 new languages.

User Account Control. While much reviled by certain users, the User Account Control (UAC) feature that debuted in Windows Vista played a huge role in making that system the most secure Windows version yet. In Windows 7, UAC is extensively updated to be less annoying, and the overall system has been fine-tuned to minimize the number of UAC prompts that interrupt users.

View Available Networks. Windows 7 includes a new Jump List-based utility for finding and connecting to Wi-Fi, mobile broadband, dial-up, and VPN connections. Unlike the similar UI in Windows Vista, this utility, called View Available Networks, does not require you to navigate through a series of dialogs and windows.

Virtual Hard Disk support. Windows 7 allows you to mount a Virtual Hard Disk (VHD) as a drive in Explorer so that you can navigate its contents like a physical hard disk. It also supports the ability to boot from VHD images.

VPN Reconnect. Windows 7 users who still need to make traditional VPN connections will benefit from a new VPN Reconnect feature that automatically reestablishes a VPN connection when you temporarily lose Internet connectivity.

Windows Anytime Upgrade. This utility debuted in Windows Vista but was found to be too confusing for most users, so the electronic upgrade capability was removed. In Windows 7, Windows Anytime Upgrade returns to electronic upgrading and Microsoft promises you'll be able to upgrade from one version of Windows 7 to another in about 10 minutes now.

Windows Defender. The malware and spyware protection utility from Windows Vista continues in Windows 7 with a few changes: It's been integrated into the new Action Center and its centralized notification system. But Defender also drops the useful Software Explorer feature, so users will have to look elsewhere for a way to prevent unwanted applications from running a startup.

Windows Easy Transfer. The Windows Easy Transfer utility that debuted in Windows Vista has been substantially updated with a new user interface and new capabilities. As before, Easy Transfer helps you transfer files, folders, and program and system settings from your previous Windows install to your new one. This time around, however, the process is simpler and more streamlined.

Windows Explorer. Microsoft has significantly updated Windows Explorer yet again in Windows 7, this time with a new toolbar, a resizable search box, and a new navigational pane.

Windows Gadgets. The Windows Sidebar disappears in Windows 7, but the Gadgets continue on and are integrated with the desktop.

Windows Live. Windows 7 integrates with a growing collection of Windows Live services, including Windows Live Photos, Windows Live Profile, Windows Live People, Windows Live Spaces, Windows Live Home, Windows Live SkyDrive, Windows Live Groups, Windows Live Calendar, Windows Live Events, Windows Live Hotmail, and more.

Windows Live Essentials. Available as an optional download, Windows Live Essentials is an application suite that includes a number of new versions of classic Windows applications, including Windows Live Mail (email and calendar), Windows Live Photo Gallery (photos), Windows Live Messenger (instant messaging), Windows Live Movie Maker (video editing), Windows Live Family Safety (enhanced parental controls), and more.

Windows Media Center. Microsoft's ten-foot UI for digital media content is improved with a slightly enhanced user interface, multi-touch support, HomeGroup integration, and various global broadcast TV standards.

Windows Media Player. Microsoft's media player received a major makeover in Windows 7 with several new features, including enhanced DVD playback, a new lightweight playback mode, dramatically improved format compatibility (including AAC and H.264), Windows Taskbar Jump List customization, PC-to-PC and media streaming, and a new Play To feature.

Windows PowerShell. Windows 7 ships with the Windows PowerShell 2.0 scripting environment and the Windows PowerShell Integrated Scripting Environment (ISE).

Windows Search. Windows 7 comes with the latest version of Windows Search, and unlike the version that first shipped with Windows Vista, you can now obtain instant search results from network-based file shares as well as local hard drives. Microsoft has also improved the performance of local searches, sorting, and grouping.

Windows Taskbar (Enhanced). The Windows Taskbar has been dramatically enhanced in Windows 7 to minimize clutter. New Taskbar features like Jump Lists, fly-over and full-screen icon previews, and more.

Windows Touch. Windows 7 builds on the Tablet PC and touch capabilities from previous Windows versions and adds pervasive support for multi-touch. All of the major UI components, including the Start Menu, Windows Taskbar, and Explorer, are touch-friendly in Windows 7.

Windows Troubleshooting. This new Windows 7 feature diagnoses and resolves common operating system and hardware issues. It works automatically, or you can visit the Troubleshooting control panel to find problems to troubleshoot. Windows Troubleshooting integrates with Action Center so you'll be notified when relevant new troubleshooters from Microsoft and third parties are made available.

Windows Update. Microsoft's utility for downloading and installing system updates has been enhanced in Windows 7 to take advantage of changes in the security model and to better expose optional and featured updates.

Wireless Device Network. Finally, Windows gains a way to use your wireless-equipped laptop as a wireless access point for other PCs when you're connected to a wired network.

WordPad. The simple word processor continues into Windows 7 with the new Scenic Ribbon UI and several editing improvements.

XPS Viewer. While Windows Vista users are forced to use Internet Explorer to view XML Paper Specification (XPS) documents--essentially Microsoft's PDF knock-off--Windows 7 gains a dedicated XPS Viewer application.


-------------------------
------------------------

Not knowing just how to post a reply since this forum is a bit different from the others of which I am a member, I shall post my limited comments here:

1) The fellow who commented that some members/posters need to get a life was SPOT ON. There's too much posturing.

2) As a Newbie to computers with only 25 years experience, I so dislike the Rubix Cube circular speak of some members, the sarcasm, ie "repackaged Vista" and the oh-so-clever' technobabble of the no-nothings, ie "my rig", have a hot swap cage", etc.

Sorry but I am desperate for clearly stated info about Win 7 RC. My business depends on it.

3) The contributor to whom I am responding has made a REAL CONTRIBUTION. In philosophy we say it is more important to ask the right question than to get an answer. To that end, this member, as with the fellow who commented about extended battery life with Win 7, are to be both APPRECIATED AND RESPECTED.

4) By way of conjecture, XP is dead, 32 bit is dead -- and will not be supported. My opinion: MS's best OS have been Win 3.11 for workgroups, Win NT 4.0 (couldn't kill it) and now Win XP Pro (dead and buried).

5) THE WORLD IS MOVING TO 64 BIT. Accept it or continue to teethe on your rattle.

6) Why? 32 bit only can address 3.45 GB. of RAM.


Happy days to all - and thanks for the meaningful and most helpful posts. Dennis@ incurablegeek@yahoo.com
June 20, 2009 5:08:13 PM

incurablegeek said:


1) The fellow who commented that some members/posters need to get a life was SPOT ON. There's too much posturing.

2) As a Newbie to computers with only 25 years experience, I so dislike the Rubix Cube circular speak of some members, the sarcasm, ie "repackaged Vista" and the oh-so-clever' technobabble of the no-nothings, ie "my rig", have a hot swap cage", etc.

Sorry but I am desperate for clearly stated info about Win 7 RC. My business depends on it.

3) The contributor to whom I am responding has made a REAL CONTRIBUTION. In philosophy we say it is more important to ask the right question than to get an answer. To that end, this member, as with the fellow who commented about extended battery life with Win 7, are to be both APPRECIATED AND RESPECTED.

4) By way of conjecture, XP is dead, 32 bit is dead -- and will not be supported. My opinion: MS's best OS have been Win 3.11 for workgroups, Win NT 4.0 (couldn't kill it) and now Win XP Pro (dead and buried).

5) THE WORLD IS MOVING TO 64 BIT. Accept it or continue to teethe on your rattle.

6) Why? 32 bit only can address 3.45 GB. of RAM.



1. Get lives? What are you talking about? No one has mentioned anything of the sort. Not that I read, anyway.
2. 25 years experience and you didn't know that hot-swap is a technical term? The rest are just jargon. This is a public, non-professional forum. If you need answers that have words larger than 30 letters, find yourself a PhD in CS. This forum is not required to give you information, don't expect it to. We all talk here for fun and help each other because we want to.
3. The person you quoted didn't make a contribution, they simply copied and pasted some facts from a site. They inserted someone else's ideas, not their own. I didn't know anyone that was disrespecting anyone here, but apparently you think so.
4. You say that 3.1, NT, and XP were the best OSs, and I disagree. I think Vista is their best finished OS, and 7 will likely take that position when they come out with it. I don't know how you can say such outdated technology is the best ever. Those OSs can't do half of what the newer ones can.
5 & 6. I don't believe anyone was talking about 64/32 bit OS support pros and cons. What are you getting at?
a b $ Windows 7
June 20, 2009 5:43:37 PM

frozenlead said:
1. Get lives? What are you talking about? No one has mentioned anything of the sort. Not that I read, anyway.
2. 25 years experience and you didn't know that hot-swap is a technical term? The rest are just jargon. This is a public, non-professional forum. If you need answers that have words larger than 30 letters, find yourself a PhD in CS. This forum is not required to give you information, don't expect it to. We all talk here for fun and help each other because we want to.
3. The person you quoted didn't make a contribution, they simply copied and pasted some facts from a site. They inserted someone else's ideas, not their own. I didn't know anyone that was disrespecting anyone here, but apparently you think so.
4. You say that 3.1, NT, and XP were the best OSs, and I disagree. I think Vista is their best finished OS, and 7 will likely take that position when they come out with it. I don't know how you can say such outdated technology is the best ever. Those OSs can't do half of what the newer ones can.
5 & 6. I don't believe anyone was talking about 64/32 bit OS support pros and cons. What are you getting at?



Very, very good points. You did fail to mention his acute ability to make random stabs at composition appear as a review of a public online tech forum.
June 20, 2009 5:56:10 PM

frozenlead said:
1. Get lives? What are you talking about? No one has mentioned anything of the sort. Not that I read, anyway.
2. 25 years experience and you didn't know that hot-swap is a technical term? The rest are just jargon. This is a public, non-professional forum. If you need answers that have words larger than 30 letters, find yourself a PhD in CS. This forum is not required to give you information, don't expect it to. We all talk here for fun and help each other because we want to.
3. The person you quoted didn't make a contribution, they simply copied and pasted some facts from a site. They inserted someone else's ideas, not their own. I didn't know anyone that was disrespecting anyone here, but apparently you think so.
4. You say that 3.1, NT, and XP were the best OSs, and I disagree. I think Vista is their best finished OS, and 7 will likely take that position when they come out with it. I don't know how you can say such outdated technology is the best ever. Those OSs can't do half of what the newer ones can.
5 & 6. I don't believe anyone was talking about 64/32 bit OS support pros and cons. What are you getting at?


1) Re "get lives", I was referring to a prior comment that I found both funny and to the point:

"The more I read the forums, the more I feel that a number of individuals would be well served by skipping their next GPU purchase in favor of a little "Stress Relief" from the local Working Girls

2) Yes, I know that was a a collection/listing from elsewhere - but I found it very helpful in prompting me to ask the right questions in the future.

3) Re: "I think Vista is their best finished OS"

All I can, son, is you are in a herd of one. Btw, Vista is dead, actually never was alive.

4) I don't know how much you hammer an OS in your daily work/use but I can say from experience that 3.11 for workgroups, then 3.51 --> 4.0 NT were bulletproof OS.

If you assert that Win 98 was quite the Gold Standard, then I can rest assured that your knowledge is truly well founded.

5) All I was wishing and hoping for is:

A) Let's separate our evaluations/advice/etc. into 32 bit and 64 bit Win 7. Please.

B) No more cryptic, cutesy comments ending with "Oh, I was just being sarcastic". Please let's be serious and try to avoid jargon that only obfuscates and confuses, ie the KISS method.


6) MOST OF THE POSTS HERE ARE DARNED HELPFUL. As you can tell, I am an unabashed newbie to Win 7 64 bit. But then a MS tech rep said I was one of the only few who could make NT 3.51 load and work - when that was a scary cutting edge OS.

7) Just luv the deep water of the future in computers, ie 64 bit. Please kindly refrain from retorting that the 32 bit OS, Vista, and the internal combustion engine are here to stay? To that I shall not reply.

8) I wish all the best and especially thank those who POST SERIOUS AND HELPFUL EVALUATIONS AND COMMENTS on their experience with Win 7. JUST PLEASE BE SO KIND AS TO SPECIFY WHICH YOU ARE TALKING ABOUT: 32 BIT OR 64 BIT.

In conclusion, I know a lot about computers -- which is to say that in this Brave New World of 64 bit I know absolutely nothing about computers. I am quite barefoot and stupid. But then I am from Tennessee. (We don't wear shoes, as you know.)
a b $ Windows 7
June 20, 2009 6:00:04 PM

I guess I'll revisit this one with a simple observation:


IMHO, it's more valuable to take a little time and identify/copy/paste/link valid information which answers someone's question than it is to spew half thought out commentary.

I'll leave it to others to decide which is which.
a b $ Windows 7
June 20, 2009 6:44:40 PM

techdeuce said:
Ok here is the things I hate.

1. windows is a menu, I don't need/want a 10gb menu.
2. the network center still sucks. Sometimes you can still ping a dns name and get replies but still not surf the internet. How are you supposed to
support that.
3. I don't care about fancy neat looking themes. win2000 was fine.
4. Speed was touted in the press releases, and it is a tad faster than vista, but 2000 is still a lot faster.



The things I like:

puppy linux
ubuntu
Dos 5 with dosshell
novell 3.12
openoffice
staroffice
win2000 with nothing but sp4 added.



Win 2K doesn't support a lot of the new hardware out there... SATA support being a big concern. It was never designed to be a mainstream OS, it was meant to be strictly used as a business OS. Now it could be used for gaming and multimedia... but again, that's not what it was designed to do. It's great on old computers, but it would definately suck on modern hardware. Much like Win 9x, 2K doesn't have a great deal of support anymore.

Of course, you're not a big Windows user anyway... so I can see how your opinion would be slanted away from XP / Vista / Win 7. There is software out there that you can use to trim "unnecassary fat" from all of them before you install: nLite and vLite. I'm sure a similar software suite will be available for Win 7. You complain about features that could easily be left out of Windows, but I can assure you of one thing: there would be many more complaints if MS left them out. People practically had a fit when they realized there were no fax functions in Vista Home Premium. Enthusiasts like yourself are an extremely small minority... the majority of people want those features left exactly where they are. Others wouldn't mind having them left out as long as it was easy to add them later... and paying for them wouldn't fly with a lot of those people. Basically, if someone is buying "Home Premium"... they expect a lot of features to be there... considering the Premium tag at the end.
a b $ Windows 7
June 20, 2009 7:01:52 PM

incurablegeek said:
1) Re "get lives", I was referring to a prior comment that I found both funny and to the point:

"The more I read the forums, the more I feel that a number of individuals would be well served by skipping their next GPU purchase in favor of a little "Stress Relief" from the local Working Girls

2) Yes, I know that was a a collection/listing from elsewhere - but I found it very helpful in prompting me to ask the right questions in the future.

3) Re: "I think Vista is their best finished OS"

All I can, son, is you are in a herd of one. Btw, Vista is dead, actually never was alive.

4) I don't know how much you hammer an OS in your daily work/use but I can say from experience that 3.11 for workgroups, then 3.51 --> 4.0 NT were bulletproof OS.

If you assert that Win 98 was quite the Gold Standard, then I can rest assured that your knowledge is truly well founded.

5) All I was wishing and hoping for is:

A) Let's separate our evaluations/advice/etc. into 32 bit and 64 bit Win 7. Please.

B) No more cryptic, cutesy comments ending with "Oh, I was just being sarcastic". Please let's be serious and try to avoid jargon that only obfuscates and confuses, ie the KISS method.


6) MOST OF THE POSTS HERE ARE DARNED HELPFUL. As you can tell, I am an unabashed newbie to Win 7 64 bit. But then a MS tech rep said I was one of the only few who could make NT 3.51 load and work - when that was a scary cutting edge OS.

7) Just luv the deep water of the future in computers, ie 64 bit. Please kindly refrain from retorting that the 32 bit OS, Vista, and the internal combustion engine are here to stay? To that I shall not reply.

8) I wish all the best and especially thank those who POST SERIOUS AND HELPFUL EVALUATIONS AND COMMENTS on their experience with Win 7. JUST PLEASE BE SO KIND AS TO SPECIFY WHICH YOU ARE TALKING ABOUT: 32 BIT OR 64 BIT.

In conclusion, I know a lot about computers -- which is to say that in this Brave New World of 64 bit I know absolutely nothing about computers. I am quite barefoot and stupid. But then I am from Tennessee. (We don't wear shoes, as you know.)



Vista is far from "dead". Considering that Windows 7 is merely an incremental release with a bit more polish, any positive opinion of Windows 7 must also be shared with Vista. Just because you don't like it or use it doesn't make it dead. The only thing that might interest you as a business user is the fact that you get a Windows XP Pro virtual machine license with Business and Ultimate versions. (Yeah, there's DX 11... but again as a business user, you probably wouldn't care). Other than that, there will be little difference between the two OSes.
June 20, 2009 10:12:18 PM

Zoron said:
Vista is far from "dead". Considering that Windows 7 is merely an incremental release with a bit more polish, any positive opinion of Windows 7 must also be shared with Vista. Just because you don't like it or use it doesn't make it dead. The only thing that might interest you as a business user is the fact that you get a Windows XP Pro virtual machine license with Business and Ultimate versions. (Yeah, there's DX 11... but again as a business user, you probably wouldn't care). Other than that, there will be little difference between the two OSes.



I respect your difference of opinion which was presented in a very constructive way. Here is where I must differ:

1) "Vista is far from "dead". Considering that Windows 7 is merely an incremental release with a bit more polish, any positive opinion of Windows 7 must also be shared with Vista. Just because you don't like it or use it doesn't make it dead.

It's not that I in particular don't like it. Most everybody considers it to be a resource hog and an embarrassment to MS. Perhaps I read too much.

Certainly I am sure you have read the many sarcastic comments by folks who bought machines pre-loaded with Vista and who then requested an "upgrade to Win XP).


2) "The only thing that might interest you as a business user is the fact that you get a Windows XP Pro virtual machine license with Business and Ultimate versions."

Only problem: Currently I use XP Pro (since its inception), SP3, 2 GB RAM; and the poor thing is choking on the workload.

New system: Quad 4 Black Box AMD CPU, Athlon MB, 8 GB DDR-2 RAM (Sorry, not DDR-3 cause it's not really faster than DDR-2 and the ASUS board only accepts DDR-2; Besides the on-board CPU trumps the RAM requirements), ASUS motherboard, 4 22 in. Acer monitors + network.

Thanks for your kind assistance. At no time do I intend sarcasm or put-down, nor shall I respond to those who comment on my posts in such a manner. In the interest of advancing your knowledge and mine, I will do my best to supply URL's that support my statements which some folks may disagree with.

Re the comment by someone else that this site is for collaborative fun, I must say that I don't see it that way. I joined the site for information, suggestions, and shoot-downs of my ideas/statements/etc. that anyone thinks are wrong. That is how I learn.

For those looking for fun and games, and not information, please check out this site: http://www.thesimpsons.com/index.html
June 21, 2009 12:26:10 AM

@incurablegeek

Well, most of us like to have fun, and I enjoy the conversations on here most of the time. I'd rather not have it as an expert collaboration rather than a normal people who do cool things with their computers collaboration.

As for Windows Vista being an embarrassment, you are sadly misinformed. Vista is not a resource hog, and everyone that says they hate it does not really pay attention to what's happening in their OS/try to understand it. Many people I know on this forum prefer Vista over XP, as do I. The interface is better and it's more usable. Vista appears from the task manager to use lots of memory, but this is really untrue - Vista is pre-loading your commonly used applications in expectation for you to use them...so Windows really isn't using that memory at all. If in the event another program needs that memory, Vista will free it. This is called Superfetch, and if you've read any sort of review of Vista that doesn't say that word, the review is pretty much invalid.

Windows NT and the others you mentioned are far from bulletproof, as are all OSs. They all have inherent, critical flaws and security breaches. Considering those you mention are many years old, now, they are much less secure than Vista. Software doesn't age like wine.

The only real difference between 64 and 32 bit is the memory addressing, and the need for 64 bit drivers/processor on the respective OS. That's about it. 64 bit technology is actually fairly old now...the first consumer 64 bit processor (the Athlon 64) is archaic, and Windows XP x64 is pretty elderly, too. I don't know how you've lasted this long in the field without knowing much about 64 bit software. Windows 7's implementation of 64 bit computing won't be very far from Vista's, which is to say, pretty darn good. Some drivers for more obscure hardware is still lacking, but that's happened for all obscure hardware for a long time now.

And, if anything, Windows XP is the dead one. The only domain it holds is on netbooks, which will soon be replaced with the superior Windows 7.
June 21, 2009 3:49:04 AM

Vista's only overused resource is HDD space. Everything else like memory usage (not prefetching) has gone up by a relatively small percentage, whereas disk space usage went up by approximately 1000% compared to XP and continues to grow as you add patches. I started off with a 15GB installation (including all directories), I'm now up to 27GB just for C:\Windows after 9 months or so and installing 2 service packs and countless updates.
a b $ Windows 7
June 21, 2009 4:28:33 AM

randomizer said:
Vista's only overused resource is HDD space. Everything else like memory usage (not prefetching) has gone up by a relatively small percentage, whereas disk space usage went up by approximately 1000% compared to XP and continues to grow as you add patches. I started off with a 15GB installation (including all directories), I'm now up to 27GB just for C:\Windows after 9 months or so and installing 2 service packs and countless updates.


You are replying to the stranger who has no knowledge of Vista 64 since M$ released it in January 2007. So far we know this much:

Quote:
1) The fellow who commented that some members/posters need to get a life was SPOT ON. There's too much posturing.


Not bad for a first comment from a guy who has worked his way up to now 4 useless posts.


Quote:
2) As a Newbie to computers with only 25 years experience, I so dislike the Rubix Cube circular speak of some members, the sarcasm, ie "repackaged Vista" and the oh-so-clever' technobabble of the no-nothings, ie "my rig", have a hot swap cage", etc


Technobabble?! And with an attitude.

Quote:
Sorry but I am desperate for clearly stated info about Win 7 RC. My business depends on it.


Thanks for apologizing before blaming all the inept people on this derilict forum, but the internet is filled with information. Like this.

Help me with my business you inferior bunch of toothless, barefooted people.

Quote:
3) The contributor to whom I am responding has made a REAL CONTRIBUTION. In philosophy we say it is more important to ask the right question than to get an answer. To that end, this member, as with the fellow who commented about extended battery life with Win 7, are to be both APPRECIATED AND RESPECTED.


Where did he get this...to the end stuff?

In philosophy we say it is more important to ask the right question than to get an answer.

Quote:
4) By way of conjecture, XP is dead, 32 bit is dead -- and will not be supported. My opinion: MS's best OS have been Win 3.11 for workgroups, Win NT 4.0 (couldn't kill it) and now Win XP Pro (dead and buried).


IMHO, it's your brain that has expired. Or at least any tissue you possess that resembles one.


Quote:
5) THE WORLD IS MOVING TO 64 BIT. Accept it or continue to teethe on your rattle.


Knaw on this genius.

http://www.nbcwashington.com/news/local/Woman-Severely-...


Quote:
6) Why? 32 bit only can address 3.45 GB. of RAM.


:heink:  Pinch me.

Happy days to all - and thanks for the meaningful and most helpful posts. Dennis@ incurablegeek@yahoo.com

You are welcome. :o 






























June 21, 2009 5:29:17 AM

Off topic, but, randomizer, why did you and shadow trade avatars? Is it just as a joke? Because I totally thought you were shadow for about 5 minutes here.
a b $ Windows 7
June 21, 2009 5:35:08 AM

I have the same question as FL, but I AM typing this on Vista 64 in spite of my Windows 7 machine. I consider this privy to the topic at hand whatever that is.


June 21, 2009 5:55:47 AM

frozenlead said:
Off topic, but, randomizer, why did you and shadow trade avatars? Is it just as a joke? Because I totally thought you were shadow for about 5 minutes here.

June 21, 2009 8:43:50 AM

I've had no problems with 7, besides the PB issue in CoD4 :( , but other than that, I get awesome fps in games, and the cpu never goes past 20 percent load, right now for example, I have CS:S minimized(In a game), Xfire, Thunderbird, Itunes, and Firefox, and the cpu is only on 3percent :D , it feels really smooth, and I love it. I am speaking as someone who went from XP to 7, and skipped Vista.
June 21, 2009 6:39:25 PM

Zoron said:
Vista is far from "dead". Considering that Windows 7 is merely an incremental release with a bit more polish, any positive opinion of Windows 7 must also be shared with Vista. Just because you don't like it or use it doesn't make it dead. The only thing that might interest you as a business user is the fact that you get a Windows XP Pro virtual machine license with Business and Ultimate versions. (Yeah, there's DX 11... but again as a business user, you probably wouldn't care). Other than that, there will be little difference between the two OSes.



Dear Zoron,

For what it's worth, I'm closing out these dialogues, because they are off-topic and not grounded in fact.

1) By its very label THIS IS A WINDOWS 7 FORUM - not (oh my gosh, Win 2K, Vista, Win XP or all the other "good-bye" technologies from MS that are now in the Smithsonian)

2) MS is quietly letting Vista die and will not support it.

3) Win 7 is the NOW (and its successor is Win 8: If you have the skills, MS is searching for a Lead Man for the Win 8 project)

4) Corporations and Universities never embraced Vista, nor did anyone for that matter.

5) 32 bit has gone the way of your 8-track; Why do you think 4 Gig. per slot RAM is just over the horizon? I am not going to insult your intelligence by reminding you that 32 bit cannot address the DDR-2 and DDR-3 RAM that is now the commodity standard. And what can you do with 3.45 Gig of RAM, the max that 32 bit can address.

-----------------------------------------
NOW SOME ON-TOPIC USEFUL INFORMATION

Contribution From Clifford Cooley @ http://www.w7forums.com/windows-7-application-compatibi...

Note: I did not author this but thought it might get some folks back on track --- in discussing Win 7 64 bit.

http://www.w7forums.com/windows-7-application-compatibi... --- QUITE A GOOD GROUP ACTUALLY

HOPE THE FOLLOWING HELPS
--------------------------------------

WORKING APPLICATIONS IN WINDOWS 7 -- POSTED BY W7FORUMS MEMBERS


7zip 7.4.65 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Detoxa
Acronis TrueImage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Naggis
Adobe CS4 (Bridge, Fireworks, Photoshop, Illustrator) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Detoxa
Adobe Flash Player . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Draceena, Clifford_cooley
Adobe Photoshop CS3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thrax
Adobe Photoshop CS4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thrax, JeeperDon
Adobe Reader 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ian, Detoxa, Martyn, Clifford_cooley
Advanced System Care Free . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .netizen
Age of Empires Gold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ryan Ashbrook's
AnyDVD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Slappydog
AppServ 2.5.10 (Apache 2.2.3, PHP 5.2.x, and MySQL 5) . . . . . . . . . . .Ryan Ashbrook's
ArcSoft Photo Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Draceena
Audacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Draceena, Clifford_cooley
Avast 4.7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Draceena
Avast pro 4.8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Detoxa
Avast! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thrax
Avg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Water_sun_sea
AVG (free version) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Geoffers, Draceena
AVG Antivirus Internet Security 8.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Betaman
Avira Antivir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Naggis, Thrax
Avira Premium Security Suite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Veteran
Belarc advisor, but operating system shows as vista ultimate . . . . . . . . Water_sun_sea
Bit Comet 1.11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Psikea
Blender 3D 2.48a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Betaman
Blu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Debsuvra
Boot-US 2.1.6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Clifford_cooley
CCleaner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Detoxa, Slappydog, Martyn, Clifford_cooley
Chronicles of Riddick - Escape from Bytcher Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Psikea
Clipmate(Clipboard Extender) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Martyn
Clone CD & Clone DVD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Slappydog
Cowon media center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Martyn
Creative Media Lite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Draceena
Cute PDF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Arbethea
Demon Tools working with spdt driver 1.58 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Psikea
Deskspace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Betaman
Digital Personal Assistant (fingerprint reader) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Slappydog
Dreamweaver in CS3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ian
Dreamweaver in CS4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JeeperDon
DVD Fab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Draceena
DVD Shrink . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Draceena
ESET NOD32 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thrax
Evernote v3.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Debsuvra
EzGenerator 3.x . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Slappydog
FireFox 3.x . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ian, Ryan Ashbrook's, Thrax, Slappydog, Draceena
Firetune . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thrax
Fireworks CS3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ian
Flash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Draceena
FlashFXP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Ashbrook's
Foxit PDF Reader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thrax
Foxit Reader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Draceena
Freedownload manager 3.848 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Detoxa
FreeRapid downloader 0.82 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Detoxa
Frets on Fire . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Betaman
Gizmo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thrax
Glary utilities pro 2.12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Detoxa
Gom Player . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Draceena
Google Chrome 1 and 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Debsuvra
Google Earth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ian
Google Earth (New Version) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Veteran
Google Sketchup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Spearace
HotDocs 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Slappydog
IE Spell. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Detoxa
Image converter plus 7.1.20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Detoxa
Incrediflash XTreme 2.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Detoxa
Internet Download Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Martyn
Irfanview 4.23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Clifford_cooley
iTunes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ian,Arbethea
iTunes 8.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Ashbrook's
IZArc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Draceena
Jack Bridge v4.01 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Veteran
Java 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Draceena
Kaspersky AV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thrax
K-Lite Codec Pack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Clifford_cooley
Last.fm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ryan Ashbrook's
Launchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thrax
Logitech SetPoint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Draceena
Lord of the Rings Online Mines of Moria (although it runs in the basic theme) . . .Betaman
MagicISO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thrax
Mailwasher Free . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Draceena
Malwarebytes Anti Malware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arbethea
Mcafee Beta works well . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Martyn
Media Player Classic (Home Cinema fork) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thrax
Microsoft Office 2003 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geoffers
Microsoft Office 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ian, Veteran, Detoxa, Clifford_cooley
Microsoft Virtual Earth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arbethea
Minefield 3.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Debsuvra
Mozbackup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thrax
MP3Tag v2.42 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Debsuvra
My Essentials Wireless Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Betaman
Nero 6.6.x . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thrax
Nero 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Debsuvra, Clifford_cooley
Nero 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Slappydog, Martyn
NetMeter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Draceena
Nod 32 ver 2.7 or 4- (30 day trial) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Slappydog
Nokia N95 software - dowloaded and installed automatically . . . . . . . . . . . .Geoffers
Norton 360 Beta for W7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Geoffers
OjoSoft Total Video Converter 2.64 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Detoxa
OmniPage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Draceena
Open Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Spearace, Draceena
Paint.NET v3.36 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Debsuvra, Clifford_cooley
Paperport 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Veteran
PDF-Viewer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Veteran
PeerGuardian2 64bit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pcspeak
PhotoFiltre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Slappydog, Draceena
phpDesigner (All Versions) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Ashbrook's
Picasa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Arbethea
PrimoPDF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Slappydog
Quake 3 Arena . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Betaman
Quicktime Alternative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Draceena
Quicktime player . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Water_sun_sea
Raxco PerfectDisk 10 build 104 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Detoxa
Read Iris 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Slappydog
Real Alternative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Draceena
RealTek audio manager took a bit of sorting out but now works well . . . . . . . . Veteran
Red Alert 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Spearace
Revo Uninstaller v1.80 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Debsuvra
RocketDock 1.3.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Betaman
Safari . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Betaman, Water_sun_sea
Seagate DiscWizard Ver11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Clifford_cooley
Skype (All) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thrax
SmartFTP 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ryan Ashbrook's
Sothink SWF Easy 6.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Detoxa
SpeedFan 4.38 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Clifford_cooley
Spybot Search And Destoy 1.6.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Detoxa
Spyzooka . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Naggis
Stardock Fences Beta. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Detoxa
Steam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ryan Ashbrook's
Switcher 3.0.0.75 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Betaman
Synctoy 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Veteran
Threatfire 4.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Detoxa
Thunderbird . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Water_sun_sea
Thunderbird 2.0.0.x . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ryan Ashbrook's
TortoiseSVN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ryan Ashbrook's
Total Commander 7.04a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Clifford_cooley
Trillian Pro (all) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thrax
Tune Up Utilities 2009 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Debsuvra
uTorrent 1.8.x . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Draceena, Clifford_cooley, Thrax
Vistabootpro to organise dual booting - works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Veteran
VistaFirewall Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Draceena
VLC Player . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ian
VMWare Workstation 6.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thrax
Wallpaper Master Free 2.16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Clifford_cooley
Winamp 5.x . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thrax
Windows live mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Water_sun_sea
Windows live messenger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Water_sun_sea
Windows Media Player . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Psikea
Windows Mobile Device Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Veteran
WinDVD Creator V3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Geoffers
WinRAR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ian
WinRAR 3.80 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Betaman
WinZip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Spearace, Arbethea
Xdn tweaker 0.9.1.6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Detoxa
Xoteck RipCast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Martyn
Yahoo Messenger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Draceena
Yahoo Messenger 9.0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Clifford_cooley
June 21, 2009 8:23:28 PM

OK, since my daughter managed to fry XP MCE on her laptop while partying - er, studying in college :) , and she has all her 'invaluable' iTunes & ripped music & pix on the hard drive, and also since she lost the Dell reinstall & XP discs to boot, I bought a new 320GB drive for her XPS 1710 and downloaded W7 32-bit and installed it yesterday. So far, what I have found is:

- W7 "homegroups" appear to be incompatible with XP & Vista workgroups - although I haven't spent much time looking how to fix this, it would have been nice if MS had included the ability to network/share files etc with other computers running different OSes. Guess I'll have to delve into the MS forums or knowledgebase, but if somebody here has a solution, much appreciated!

- W7 seems to have a lot of driver support - it found the MS bluetooth mouse that I had, which I expected since it's Microsoft, but it also found an ancient ATI wireless remote controller that came with a 9800 All-in-Wonder video card, and loaded the drivers. Impressive, except that when I tried to install the remote software downloaded from AMD, I encountered various installation & registration problems so that several DLLs wouldn't load. Tried setting the compatibility all the way back to W2K, no help.

- I like the MCE software in W7, plus the fact that my WinTV USB tuner actually works in it, although some HD channels have gone mysteriously missing and Hauppage says the 950Q is clearQAM HD compatible. MCE also plays DVDs pretty well, although when displaying the movies on an HDTV separate window, the mouse cursor is stuck there until I minimize the window - then I can move it back to the laptop display where I have the desktop located. Also, the bluetooth mouse stopped working on one occasion and I had to reboot W7 and rediscover it before it would work again - possibly the bum ATI driver install had something to do with it as I had tried that immediately before.

- W7 does seem to boot faster than XP, but that's likely because I have only a day & a half of bloatware on W7 installed so far :) . Office XP & Nero 9 are the two biggest hogs so far, but more oinkers are scheduled for delivery soon.

Well that's it so far, but then I'm a W7 n00b :D .
a b $ Windows 7
June 21, 2009 11:23:38 PM

Perhaps you failed to notice, but I am running 64-bit Vista on both my desktop and laptop... so telling me that 32-bit is going the way of the dodo is moot. Because I've had so few issues with Vista x64, I intend to stick with 64-bit and never go back.

Service pack 2 for Vista was just released. Vista's support cycle is just beginning while XP's is nearing it's end. Vista will continue to be supported for another 6 or 7 years, while XP has 3 - 4 years left. People latched on to and believed the anti-hype surrounding Vista having never even had a casual glance at it. What this tells me is that people blindly believe anything they're told about a product over the internet... rather than use the product and formulate their own opinion.

Your assertion that no-one embraced Vista is very factually incorrect. While Vista hasn't quite enjoyed the success of XP, that doesn't mean that everyone skipped it. I know of at least one University that absolutely LOVES Vista and Server 2008. Of course, they tested it extensively rather than just go along with the negative press.

Windows 7 isn't the NOW, it's the future. It's not scheduled to be release until 4th quarter. MS isn't rushing it out the door... they planned for 3-year product cycles. The reason XP is sticking around so long is because Vista was delayed. I'm not in any way bashing Windows 7, I'm merely saying that for Vista users, Windows 7 looks less impressive than it would to Windows XP users. Normally, I'd upgrade almost immediately to the new OS, but now that I've seen and used Windows 7... I'd be content to wait another year.
June 22, 2009 12:09:54 AM

I don't want to use Window 7 in its current state. If I find it faster than Vista (which in my early testing wasn't the case, it was Vista with a modified GUI) then I'm not going to want to go back to a "slow" Vista once the RC expires, and I wouldn't want to go back to a much faster XP because then I'll have to remember what model Ethernet controller I'm using to find drivers for it. I have not paid for Windows since XP and I vowed not to pay for Windows again until at least "Windows 8." If Windows 7 becomes avaliable on MSDN Academic Alliance then I'll grab it ASAP, but until then it's Vista for me.
June 22, 2009 12:38:35 AM

I have four other things to say to incurablegeek -

1. No one here is even mentioning 32/64 bit crap. That field is kind of old now. Everything will eventually be 64 bit. Yay. Why do you keep bringing it up? No one here is talking about it. Old news.

2. The University of Michigan, which I'm pretty sure is in the top 20 universities of the world (but don't quote me! it also depends on who you ask) uses Vista extensively. The only way you can use XP on campus is in a specialized lab or on a virtual client.

3. Windows 7 isn't out yet, which makes it the future, not now.

4. That list of applications is almost completely useless. Do you realize how many applications there are that run on Windows? Trying to round them all up on one list is a waste of time. It's more effective to just go to the manufacturer's website and look it up.

5. (because I feel like it) this thread isn't even about general information on Windows 7, it's about it's advantages. Start a new thread if that what you want, or find one that's already in progress.
June 22, 2009 5:48:21 PM

Zoron said:
Perhaps you failed to notice, but I am running 64-bit Vista on both my desktop and laptop... so telling me that 32-bit is going the way of the dodo is moot. Because I've had so few issues with Vista x64, I intend to stick with 64-bit and never go back.

Service pack 2 for Vista was just released. Vista's support cycle is just beginning while XP's is nearing it's end. Vista will continue to be supported for another 6 or 7 years, while XP has 3 - 4 years left. People latched on to and believed the anti-hype surrounding Vista having never even had a casual glance at it. What this tells me is that people blindly believe anything they're told about a product over the internet... rather than use the product and formulate their own opinion.

Your assertion that no-one embraced Vista is very factually incorrect. While Vista hasn't quite enjoyed the success of XP, that doesn't mean that everyone skipped it. I know of at least one University that absolutely LOVES Vista and Server 2008. Of course, they tested it extensively rather than just go along with the negative press.

Windows 7 isn't the NOW, it's the future. It's not scheduled to be release until 4th quarter. MS isn't rushing it out the door... they planned for 3-year product cycles. The reason XP is sticking around so long is because Vista was delayed. I'm not in any way bashing Windows 7, I'm merely saying that for Vista users, Windows 7 looks less impressive than it would to Windows XP users. Normally, I'd upgrade almost immediately to the new OS, but now that I've seen and used Windows 7... I'd be content to wait another year.


Thanks for the post. For once someone actually presented factual experience without excessive condescension or twisted syntax. So thanks again. According to MS, support for XP has already been terminated, though I forget the exact month of termination. Sorry but Vista never caught on - with anyone - such that the word Vista has almost become a vulgar epithet. I remember the days when anyone in a company/university who replaced NT 4.0 with Win 98 were immediately terminated.

Win 3.11, then Win NT 4.0 (which required and ran well with only 64 MB of RAM!), then Win 2K (which I loved because it gave me more control and didn't auto-default/select for me) and now XP Pro are MS at its very best. I still maintain that MS has temporarily lost its direction (possibly with all this nouveau "cloud computing" threat). From what I have read, MS is quietly letting Vista die, if for no other reason the fact that "Vista" has a well earned pejorative meaning. I did read where MS is looking for a Project Leader for Win 8 such that I'm sure that Win 7 is the NOW, and not Vista. (Just an educated opinion, and not a dictum). I can say for sure 32 bit is dead. Trust me on that one. The MB and RAM mfrs. are putting out products for which 32 bit is anemic and impotent.

And, yes sir, I do know that 64 bit is not new. It's just now that OS's are being built that can amply use all the features of the new hardware.

So, see we had a difference of opinion. And we chose to disagree like civilized beings. Thanks My opinion: This group is definitely not of Toms Hardware quality. There are too many people chest thumping and fist pumping. I don't want to win at anything. I just want to learn. So if you think I am wrong, please feel free to tell me. And, once again thanks for the info. I will keep my mind open to Vista as well as Win 7. With 5 TB of HD space. I can set up both OS via usb - and experiment. All the best, Dennis
a b $ Windows 7
June 22, 2009 8:57:30 PM

That is true, badge, but extended support will continue until 2014... which means MS will still be releasing security patches/critical updates up until that time. Originally, it was only supposed to go to 2011 or 2012... but because Vista was delayed, XP's support cycle was extended.

MS has stated for a while now that mainstream support continues for 5 years after a product release and extended support will go to 10 years. Win 9x was cut short prematurely because it was strictly considered to be a consumer OS. Since all versions of Windows now run on the same kernal... everyone gets the support that businesses enjoy.

I'm glad that after Windows 7, there will be no more 32-bit OS from MS. Now that 64-bit is finally becoming mainstream, there is simply no need. There are some that argue we don't need 64-bit... but as RAM and graphics memory keep increasing, 32-bit will be woefully inadequate.
a b $ Windows 7
June 22, 2009 9:14:25 PM

Vista 64 is the vulgar epithet responsible for making 64 bit computing mainstream. Of course sissy's who don't know how to load an OS may disagree.

Edit: for sissy's.
a b $ Windows 7
June 22, 2009 9:20:18 PM

I am currently compiling an author noted list of Vista capable drivers/software which are incompatible with Windows 7. Listed by the day of the week:

Sun....Capote

Mon...Hemingway

Tue...Stalin

Wed...Pol Pot

Thurs...Hitler

Fri...TGI Friday's

Sat...Hemingway, Muriel

Sun...Rivera, Heraldo

Edited for Writer's embellishments.
June 22, 2009 11:18:26 PM

I shall not waste any more time with this "group". Too many (all?) are frustrated flamers, the likes of which I don't find anywhere else on the net.

It is indeed easy to call someone a mental patient, a sissy, whatever on the net. Those with the courage to do so in person, however, might find themselves with a great view of the ceiling -- when or if they wake up.

For too many, a "white gloves and party manners" class is in order.

New info?:

1) 64 bit is not yet mainstream but is mostly used by hobbyists. 64 bit has been talked about for about 15 years now, but is still not widely accepted.

2) Support for XP (sadly) has been terminated. "Upgrading" to XP Pro has eaten away badly at the profits hoped for, but not gleaned, from the Vista fiasco.

3) Win 7 RC is out (I have it) and the "for sale" version should debut in late fall.

4) FYI, Win 7 is a build on Vista, which MS would very much like to forget. There shall be no future version or upgrade to Vista. Vista was already D.O.A. when it hit the market.

Read, learn and then --- speak. Too much of the info taken here as "common knowledge" is mind-numbingly wrong. And the sarcasm and nastiness is just that.
Over and out.
a b $ Windows 7
June 23, 2009 12:03:04 AM

incurablegeek said:
I shall not waste any more time with this "group" of sick prostitutes./fixed. Too many (all?) are frustrated flamers, the likes of which I don't find anywhere else on the net have rotted my brain away and gave me diseases only my mother dreamed about. knew./fixed

It is indeed easy correct to call someone me a mental patient, a sissy, whatever sleeping on a net at the asylum. Those with courage a car to so in drive to Tennessee in person, however, might find themselves with a great view of of the ceiling my half dressed, bucktoothed 15 year old wife -- when or if they wake up./fixed

Far too many away in Neverneverland, a "white gloves and party manners" class is in order./fixed

New infoThe new phone book is here!:/fixed

1) 64 bit is not yet mainstream but is mostly used by lobbyists Al Gore). 64 bit has been talked about about 15 years now by me , but is still not widely acceptedmy ignorant opinions about life with 64 bit and living with farm animals is not accepted./fixed

2) Support for XP my feelings (sadly) has been terminated. "Upgrading" to XP Pro has eaten is like a calling for a service and getting a hillbilly escort with bad teeth. The profits hoped for on her part, but not gleaned, from the Vista saturday nite out on main street fiasco with Pat. In fact, may I add, Vista is like dating a transgender waiting for the big op day./fixed

3)
Quote:
Win 7 RC is out (I have it) and the "for sale" version should debut in late fall.
:sarcastic:  Wow, you should have said something...

4) FYI, Win 7 is a build on Vista, which MS would very much like to forget. There shall be no future version or upgrade to Vista. Vista was already D.O.A. when it hit the market. Lil' Abner/fixed

Read, learn and then --- speak. You imbesile, rectitudeless Tom's Guide apes./fixed . Too many much of the info women I meet are "common knowledge" and is mind-numbingly wrong. And the sarcasm and nastiness is just that.
Over and out./fixed


Quote:
"The more I read the forums, the more I feel that a number of individuals would be well served by skipping their next GPU purchase in favor of a little "Stress Relief" from the local Working Girls


:sol:  Stay classy.
June 23, 2009 12:18:34 AM

Ok that's enough, this thread has nothing to do with benefits of Windows 7 any more and isn't going anywhere good.
!