Power Protection

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

I currently use a Cyber Power UPS. It's surge protection is rated at about
1500 joules. I note that many common power strips are rated much higher.
Is it wise to use additional surge protection and, if so, should it be
applied before or after the UPS?

TIA
2 answers Last reply
More about power protection
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <OKmdnZU15cnOTOPfRVn-3g@comcast.com>, "Gert B. Frob"
    <sbrentcarter@spaminator.net> wrote:

    > I currently use a Cyber Power UPS. It's surge protection is rated at about
    > 1500 joules. I note that many common power strips are rated much higher.
    > Is it wise to use additional surge protection and, if so, should it be
    > applied before or after the UPS?
    >
    > TIA

    I would place it before the UPS. For example, a Tripplite
    ISOBAR has a warranty that is only valid, if the power
    strip is connected directly to the wall, with no other
    extension cord. The power strip is probably cheaper to
    replace, if the surge protection is damaged, so that
    is another reason to sacrifice it first.

    Paul
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    First, the reason why power strips must not be plugged into
    UPS outputs: those UPS outputs deliver bad harmonics and
    spikes when the UPS is in battery backup mode. So why are
    these UPS outputs not destructive to the computer? Computers
    are some of the most resilient appliances in the house. That
    same UPS output could be destructive to some small motors and
    a power strip protectors, but is just fine for a computer.

    Second, the protector is not protection. The protector is
    only effective when it connects a transient to protection.
    Connection distance is important. Protection is earth
    ground. Earthing is the only component required in every
    protection system. Some systems provide protection without
    protectors - ie CATV. Protected CATV wire connects less than
    10 feet to earth ground before entering the building. Other
    systems require a protector to connect the utility wire to
    earth - ie AC electric and telephone.

    But this is the point. A protector without a short
    connection to earth ground is not effective. Some are
    outrightly deceived into thinking a protector is protection.
    It is not. The protector is only as effective as the earth
    ground it connects to. No earth ground (ie too far away means
    too much wire impedance) means no effective protection.

    The effective protector costs about $1 per protected
    appliance. It is located 'less than 10 feet' from a single
    point earth ground (ie same ground required by circuit breaker
    box and post 1990 National Electrical Code), and must have
    sufficient joules. To be equivalent to a minimally sized
    'whole house' protector, that power strip would need be 3000
    joules - and cost how much per protected appliance?

    'Whole house' protectors are so inexpensive and so effective
    that your phone line should already have one installed for
    free by the telephone company. But again, telco installed
    protector also is only as effective as its earth ground. If
    not connected less than 10 feet to the same earth ground as AC
    electric and cable, then the protector has compromised.
    Protector is only effective when it connects to protection.

    AC electric is the most common source of destructive
    transients. Minimally acceptable protectors are sold by
    responsible retailers such as Home Depot (Intermatic) and
    Lowes (Cutler Hammer and GE). Other brand names include
    Square D, Erico, Leviton, Furse, GE, Polyphaser, and Siemens.
    Never saw an effective protector sold in Sears, Kmart,
    Staples, Walmart, Target, Office Max, or Radio Shack. A short
    list of responsible manufacturers is provided.

    You may need to upgrade the building earth ground to exceed
    post 1990 NEC requirements. Again, protection is not the
    protector nor something in a plug-in UPS. The protector is
    only effective when it makes a short (less than 10 foot),
    direct, and independent connection to a single point earth
    ground - the protection. Ineffective protectors (ie power
    strip protectors) solve this problem by pretending earthing
    does not exist. Notice which type of destructive transient
    they don't even discuss. Notice they claim protection only
    from a transient that typically does not damage electronics to
    sell their overpriced product. Ineffective protectors must
    completely ignore earthing to make a sale. Ineffective
    protectors typically cost tens of times more money per
    protected appliance. An effective protector is as effective
    as its earth ground. Earthing is the protection; not some
    undersized power strip protector that hopes you never learn
    what is posted above.

    Above discusses your secondary protection. Its
    effectiveness is defined by your building's single point earth
    ground. An enhanced earth ground means adjacent protectors
    are even more effective. But also inspect your primary
    protection as installed by the utility:
    http://www.tvtower.com/fpl.html

    Notice what is the only and most critical component in a
    surge protection system - earth ground. That plug-in
    protector has all but no earth ground. Therefore its
    manufacturer does not even discuss earthing. A protector is
    only as effective as its earth ground. Start by inspecting
    and upgrading the most critical protection component -
    earthing.

    "Gert B. Frob" wrote:
    > I currently use a Cyber Power UPS. It's surge protection is rated
    > at about 1500 joules. I note that many common power strips are
    > rated much higher. Is it wise to use additional surge protection
    > and, if so, should it be applied before or after the UPS?
    >
    > TIA
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