How can I get more vcore on my ASUS A8N-SLI?

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

I really do need more vcore to my winchester 3000+ - but even that I
put the vcore at 1.65 in the BIOS, my Winchester gets only 1.584 v. I
do use the BIOS 1006.

I got an ASUS A8N-SLI mb.

Could someone tell me how to get more juice out of the mb?

324 X 8:

http://bigup.peecee.lir.dk/view.php?id=8739

330 X 6:

http://bigup.peecee.lir.dk/view.php?id=8756
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More about vcore asus
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <4289ffeb$1_3@alt.athenanews.com>,
    slotsgade@privat.tele-dot-dk.no-spam.invalid (Ezistef) wrote:

    > I really do need more vcore to my winchester 3000+ - but even that I
    > put the vcore at 1.65 in the BIOS, my Winchester gets only 1.584 v. I
    > do use the BIOS 1006.
    >
    > I got an ASUS A8N-SLI mb.
    >
    > Could someone tell me how to get more juice out of the mb?
    >
    > 324 X 8:
    >
    > http://bigup.peecee.lir.dk/view.php?id=8739
    >
    > 330 X 6:
    >
    > http://bigup.peecee.lir.dk/view.php?id=8756

    AMD document 31411

    "Absolute Maximum Ratings
    Stresses greater than those listed in Table 13 may cause permanent
    damage to the device and motherboard. Systems using this device must
    be designed to ensure that these parameters are not violated.
    Violation of these ratings will void the product warranty. Exposure
    to absolute maximum rating conditions for extended periods may
    affect device reliability.

    VDD supply voltage relative to VSS ­0.3 V to 1.65 V "

    That is why the Asus BIOS doesn't allow more than 1.65V.
    You'll just have to do a volt mod, if you want more.

    This article says Semtech SC2643VX is the Vcore regulator.
    http://www.lostcircuits.com/motherboard/asus_a8nsli/4.shtml

    A datasheet for the SC2643VX can be found here:
    http://www.semtech.com/products/products_line_subfamilydisplay.asp_Q_SubFamilyID_E_18_A_FamilyID_E_2

    It is my experience, that 50% of the voltage modding techniques
    documented on the web, are just a bad idea. You must be
    especially careful to do your own analysis of how each volt
    mod technique proposes to work. Some of the ideas would pick up
    noise and give a shaky voltage to the CPU - those are the ideas
    I like to avoid. Modification via the VID signals, because they
    are digital control signals, is a safer bet, but we don't know if
    any GPIO signals driving these pins would be safe to ground or
    not. (I have managed to trace the control signals on one of
    my older motherboards, but it is a time consuming process. If
    the GPIO use series limiting resistors, then forcing the VID
    pins to ground would be safe.)

    The SC2643 is especially flexible, and supports several VID codings.
    The first step, is determining which coding is being used on
    the chip. The VID5 pin is a multi-level logic input - the schematic
    in the datasheet shows the three voltages that can be connected to
    the pin. What I don't understand here, is how it would be possible
    to use standard VID codings, and yet get more than the K8 coding
    limit of 1.55V. Using the pin5 error offset adjustment terminal,
    would boost all voltages, and I doubt that would be acceptable to
    Asus (to reach 1.65V). Using the VRM9.X coding also does the
    equivalent of boosting all voltages, so the only way this could
    work, is if the processor VID signals are not directly
    connected to the SC2643.

    Perhaps you could use a multimeter, measure the voltage level
    presented on all the VID pins, as a function of the voltage
    set in the BIOS or via a Windows tweaking util. That might give
    you some idea as to how the SC2643 is configured. (Take your
    system out of the computer case, and do this work with the
    system assembled on your work table - that is the only safe
    way to be probing signals on a motherboard. It is too easy to
    short stuff, if you are probing while the mobo is still in
    the computer case.)

    In any case, you'll have to do some sleuthing first, before jumping
    into a volt mod. At least I hope, by presenting the information
    from the AMD processor datasheet 31411, that you know you are
    in suicide territory, in terms of voltage. I am all in favor of
    overclocking, as long as it is done within the bounds of the
    hardware - after all, the idea is to get something for nothing,
    and a suicide overclock that lasts for only one month of operation
    is not money well spent. If you wanted a "heroic overclock",
    you would have started with a FX processor, right ?

    Many of the volt mod techniques that use three terminal pots, will
    kill the hardware if the pot is twisted all the way to one extreme
    or the other. Also, if a wire breaks off, while the system is
    powered, the instant overvolt can kill the motherboard, the processor
    or both. The connections on the board are very tiny, and it is
    difficult to get pots or resistors connected. I've modded my A7N8X-E
    a while back, and was at the limits of my soldering skills (I need a
    stereoscopic microscope to do better work, but cannot afford one of
    those for home projects) - and I do that kind of stuff for a living.
    If you've never soldered before, I don't recommend making your first
    mod on a $175 motherboard.

    Paul
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