A8N-SLI Premium -- reported temps

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

The temps reported on my new A8N-SLI Premium right, but I'm hoping
someone can share his experience with me.

I get these temperatures from three places: BIOS Hardware Monitor, Asus
Probe, and nVidia Monitor.
My CPU temp is reported as 25-29°C
My System temp is reported as 30-33°
My CPU is an Athlon 64 3500+ (Venice) and my CPU cooler is an XP120 with
the fan at 1850rpm.
Even on Sisoft Sandra's burn-in app, the temp won't go above 29° with a
room temp of about 23° and the case open.
Indeed, the entire heatsink is very cool to the touch.

The CPU temp seems too low to be real. Compared to my other Asus board
(A7M266), the system temp seems to high to be correct. And it's
difficult to understand how the CPU temp could be lower than the system
temp. Anyone with the same hardware out there? What could be going on?
26 answers Last reply
More about premium reported temps
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "milleron" <miller.90@osu.edu> wrote in message
    news:XFove.17119$pU.15838@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com...
    > The temps reported on my new A8N-SLI Premium right, but I'm hoping someone
    > can share his experience with me.
    >
    > I get these temperatures from three places: BIOS Hardware Monitor, Asus
    > Probe, and nVidia Monitor.
    > My CPU temp is reported as 25-29°C
    > My System temp is reported as 30-33°
    > My CPU is an Athlon 64 3500+ (Venice) and my CPU cooler is an XP120 with
    > the fan at 1850rpm.
    > Even on Sisoft Sandra's burn-in app, the temp won't go above 29° with a
    > room temp of about 23° and the case open.
    > Indeed, the entire heatsink is very cool to the touch.
    >
    > The CPU temp seems too low to be real. Compared to my other Asus board
    > (A7M266), the system temp seems to high to be correct. And it's difficult
    > to understand how the CPU temp could be lower than the system temp.
    > Anyone with the same hardware out there? What could be going on?

    Never look a gift horse in the mouth. Is the computer actually working? If
    so, enjoy.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    On Sat, 25 Jun 2005 20:55:19 -0600, "Mark A" <nobody@nowhere.com>
    wrote:

    >"milleron" <miller.90@osu.edu> wrote in message
    >news:XFove.17119$pU.15838@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com...
    >> The temps reported on my new A8N-SLI Premium right, but I'm hoping someone
    >> can share his experience with me.
    >>
    >> I get these temperatures from three places: BIOS Hardware Monitor, Asus
    >> Probe, and nVidia Monitor.
    >> My CPU temp is reported as 25-29°C
    >> My System temp is reported as 30-33°
    >> My CPU is an Athlon 64 3500+ (Venice) and my CPU cooler is an XP120 with
    >> the fan at 1850rpm.
    >> Even on Sisoft Sandra's burn-in app, the temp won't go above 29° with a
    >> room temp of about 23° and the case open.
    >> Indeed, the entire heatsink is very cool to the touch.
    >>
    >> The CPU temp seems too low to be real. Compared to my other Asus board
    >> (A7M266), the system temp seems to high to be correct. And it's difficult
    >> to understand how the CPU temp could be lower than the system temp.
    >> Anyone with the same hardware out there? What could be going on?
    >
    >Never look a gift horse in the mouth. Is the computer actually working? If
    >so, enjoy.
    >
    Yeah, it works great. It's just that I've never seen MB temps higher
    than CPU temps before, so I'm very curious.
    Ron
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "milleron" <millerdot90@SPAMlessosu.edu> wrote in message
    news:uklsb11gitbmqjl5h98uu15n9p9fobim0a@4ax.com...
    > Yeah, it works great. It's just that I've never seen MB temps higher
    > than CPU temps before, so I'm very curious.
    > Ron

    Mine is the same way. I think it is partly because of the heat from the
    video card.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Asus Probe isn't reliable.
    Most people uses to test with Everest
    http://www.lavalys.com/products/overview.php?pid=1&lang=en


    "milleron" <millerdot90@SPAMlessosu.edu> escribió en el mensaje
    news:uklsb11gitbmqjl5h98uu15n9p9fobim0a@4ax.com...
    > On Sat, 25 Jun 2005 20:55:19 -0600, "Mark A" <nobody@nowhere.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>"milleron" <miller.90@osu.edu> wrote in message
    >>news:XFove.17119$pU.15838@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com...
    >>> The temps reported on my new A8N-SLI Premium right, but I'm hoping
    >>> someone
    >>> can share his experience with me.
    >>>
    >>> I get these temperatures from three places: BIOS Hardware Monitor, Asus
    >>> Probe, and nVidia Monitor.
    >>> My CPU temp is reported as 25-29°C
    >>> My System temp is reported as 30-33°
    >>> My CPU is an Athlon 64 3500+ (Venice) and my CPU cooler is an XP120 with
    >>> the fan at 1850rpm.
    >>> Even on Sisoft Sandra's burn-in app, the temp won't go above 29° with a
    >>> room temp of about 23° and the case open.
    >>> Indeed, the entire heatsink is very cool to the touch.
    >>>
    >>> The CPU temp seems too low to be real. Compared to my other Asus board
    >>> (A7M266), the system temp seems to high to be correct. And it's
    >>> difficult
    >>> to understand how the CPU temp could be lower than the system temp.
    >>> Anyone with the same hardware out there? What could be going on?
    >>
    >>Never look a gift horse in the mouth. Is the computer actually working? If
    >>so, enjoy.
    >>
    > Yeah, it works great. It's just that I've never seen MB temps higher
    > than CPU temps before, so I'm very curious.
    > Ron
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "Mark A" <nobody@nowhere.com> wrote in message
    news:Q5udnc151sT9-SPfRVn-gg@comcast.com...
    > "milleron" <millerdot90@SPAMlessosu.edu> wrote in message
    > news:uklsb11gitbmqjl5h98uu15n9p9fobim0a@4ax.com...
    >> Yeah, it works great. It's just that I've never seen MB temps higher
    >> than CPU temps before, so I'm very curious.
    >> Ron
    >
    > Mine is the same way. I think it is partly because of the heat from the
    > video card.
    >

    Mine is like that too. The CPU temp currently 31c while the motherboard temp
    is showing at 34c.

    I thought there was something wrong with the sensors at first but if I touch
    the base of the heatsink on the CPU it's only just warm whereas my old XP
    got very hot indeed.

    Another (initially disturbing) aspect to this is the low temps cause the CPU
    fan to stop (it's stopped now as I type this) yet the CPU temp doesn't rise
    unless I play a game or something a bit more processor intensive. The fan
    then wakes up but only at around 2000rpm which is still barely audible.

    Who needs to spend a fortune on a quiet PC when standard kit is as good as
    this? :-)
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    On Sun, 26 Jun 2005 02:16:32 -0600, "Mark A" <nobody@nowhere.com>
    wrote:

    >"milleron" <millerdot90@SPAMlessosu.edu> wrote in message
    >news:uklsb11gitbmqjl5h98uu15n9p9fobim0a@4ax.com...
    >> Yeah, it works great. It's just that I've never seen MB temps higher
    >> than CPU temps before, so I'm very curious.
    >> Ron
    >
    >Mine is the same way. I think it is partly because of the heat from the
    >video card.
    >
    So does anyone know where the "motherboard" sensor is located? Could
    it be reporting the southbridge temperature? My "system" temp with my
    older Asus board is a reasonable approximation of room temp -- about
    4-5°C warmer. On the A8N-SLI Premium, it's really not. I can measure
    the temperature coming out of the top and rear vents of my case, and
    the reported "system" or "motherboard" temp is a good 10-11° warmer.
    I don't really know of any location on the motherboard that would be
    that much hotter other than the southbridge.

    Again, I'm just curious to know what's really being reported. I'm
    hoping that there's an engineer type who can say where the sensor's
    located.

    Ron
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    > older Asus board is a reasonable approximation of room temp -- about
    > 4-5°C warmer. On the A8N-SLI Premium, it's really not. I can measure
    > the temperature coming out of the top and rear vents of my case, and
    > the reported "system" or "motherboard" temp is a good 10-11° warmer.
    > I don't really know of any location on the motherboard that would be
    > that much hotter other than the southbridge.

    The same here. This sensor is certainly near the CPU or chipset. With MBM
    I've found a third sensor which seems to be more realistic to me: 29° C.
    That's close to the value of my former hardware in my pc case: P4C800-E. I
    was shocked to see about 40° C after changing to AMD/A8N-SLI Premium.
    I also want to know, where are the sensors located on this board ?

    bye

    tom
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    On Mon, 27 Jun 2005 08:37:44 +0200, "tom" <te1@bigfoot.com> wrote:

    >> older Asus board is a reasonable approximation of room temp -- about
    >> 4-5°C warmer. On the A8N-SLI Premium, it's really not. I can measure
    >> the temperature coming out of the top and rear vents of my case, and
    >> the reported "system" or "motherboard" temp is a good 10-11° warmer.
    >> I don't really know of any location on the motherboard that would be
    >> that much hotter other than the southbridge.
    >
    >The same here. This sensor is certainly near the CPU or chipset. With MBM
    >I've found a third sensor which seems to be more realistic to me: 29° C.
    >That's close to the value of my former hardware in my pc case: P4C800-E. I
    >was shocked to see about 40° C after changing to AMD/A8N-SLI Premium.
    >I also want to know, where are the sensors located on this board ?
    >
    >bye
    >
    >tom
    >
    I found that extra sensor with Lavalys Everest, and it's similar to
    yours. My temps are reported there as:
    motherboard 41
    CPU 26
    "Aux" 36

    (The BIOS Hardware reports the CPU to be 36 and the system to be 41)

    I suspect that the CPU is 36, the motherboard's 26, and the
    southbridge is 41, but I still don't know how to be sure. I just
    can't imagine anything on the motherboard being hotter than the CPU
    unless it's the southbridge, (You can put your 37°-finger right on the
    southbridge's heatpipe receptacle, and it's barely warm to the touch.)

    Ron
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <q001c1tljqvs9ctm4vfr7tu9h1isar06mf@4ax.com>,
    miller.90@spamlessosu.edu wrote:

    > On Mon, 27 Jun 2005 08:37:44 +0200, "tom" <te1@bigfoot.com> wrote:
    >
    > >> older Asus board is a reasonable approximation of room temp -- about
    > >> 4-5°C warmer. On the A8N-SLI Premium, it's really not. I can measure
    > >> the temperature coming out of the top and rear vents of my case, and
    > >> the reported "system" or "motherboard" temp is a good 10-11° warmer.
    > >> I don't really know of any location on the motherboard that would be
    > >> that much hotter other than the southbridge.
    > >
    > >The same here. This sensor is certainly near the CPU or chipset. With MBM
    > >I've found a third sensor which seems to be more realistic to me: 29° C.
    > >That's close to the value of my former hardware in my pc case: P4C800-E. I
    > >was shocked to see about 40° C after changing to AMD/A8N-SLI Premium.
    > >I also want to know, where are the sensors located on this board ?
    > >
    > >bye
    > >
    > >tom
    > >
    > I found that extra sensor with Lavalys Everest, and it's similar to
    > yours. My temps are reported there as:
    > motherboard 41
    > CPU 26
    > "Aux" 36
    >
    > (The BIOS Hardware reports the CPU to be 36 and the system to be 41)
    >
    > I suspect that the CPU is 36, the motherboard's 26, and the
    > southbridge is 41, but I still don't know how to be sure. I just
    > can't imagine anything on the motherboard being hotter than the CPU
    > unless it's the southbridge, (You can put your 37°-finger right on the
    > southbridge's heatpipe receptacle, and it's barely warm to the touch.)
    >
    > Ron

    IT8712F SuperI/O and hardware monitor

    LPC based (easier for software to find)
    Eight voltage sensors:
    Pin98 2 volt for Vcore1 of CPU
    Pin97 2 volt for Vcore2 of CPU
    Pin96 3.3 volt for system
    Pin95 5 volt for system
    Pin94 +12 volt for system
    Pin93 -12 volt for system
    Pin92 -5 volt for system
    Pin91 5 volt for VCCH (possibly meaning +5VSB)
    Three temp sensors:
    Pin89 TmpIn1 Transistor, diode, or thermistor based input
    Pin88 TmpIn2 Transistor, diode, or thermistor based input
    Pin87 TmpIn3 Transistor, diode, or thermistor based input

    If a person wanted to determine what was hooked up, they would
    start tracing copper wires from pins 87 through 89 on the IT8712F
    SuperI/O chip. The software doesn't know, on the temp inputs,
    what type of device is being used. (It would be hard coded in
    the BIOS, one would hope.) The software needs to know
    the device type (transistor, diode, thermistor), as the voltage
    to temperature conversion formula will be different for each.
    While ITE attempted to standardize the use of voltage inputs
    on pin 98 through 91 (by assigning standard meanings to them,
    and implying standard scale factors in use for each one), there
    are no standards for the temperature inputs in the datasheet.

    http://www.iteusa.com/product_info/PC/Brief-IT8712_2.asp

    There is a register that would be set up by the BIOS, that
    indicates whether a diode/transistor or a thermistor is
    being used on a channel. Now, how do you read the registers
    on a chip like that ? That is the question... (This problem
    would likely be easier to investigate in Linux, than in
    Windows.)

    For thermistors, the practice is pretty standard, to use
    a 10K ohm thermistor (value at 25 degrees C), and a 10K ohm
    resistor to make a voltage divider. The thermistor used also
    has a certain beta value (3435?), which seems to be common from
    board to board. For the most part, that means a utility
    should be able to deal successfully with a thermistor,
    if it knows it is a thermistor. (These thermistors are
    non-linear devices, so there is a conversion curve - it
    looks like the 8712F has a ROM lookup table inside, forcing
    the thermistor to be a standard type for sure.)

    I don't know right off hand, what math is used for diode type
    sensing, but presumably if you trace down the source for
    "lm_sensors" or the like from Linux, the method should become
    clear.

    As for "what do thermistors look like", unfortunately some
    of the surface mount ones I've looked at, are not that much
    different than ordinary resistors in appearance. If a
    thermistor is used in a processor socket, and the socket has
    a hole in the center, chances are you'll see the thermistor
    in the hole area. For motherboard temps, you'd have to trace
    conductors to try and find the thing. Motherboards usually
    have four layer stackup (with the odd one using six layers),
    so unfortunately not all the copper is visible from the
    outside of the board. Good luck figuring it all out :-)

    Paul
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Paul,

    thank you for your very informative contribution

    > outside of the board. Good luck figuring it all out :-)
    He, he, I guess dying dumb in this case is the more simple way than tracing
    for those temp sensors ;-)

    bye

    tom
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Hi,

    My A8N Sli premium is reporting temps of:

    36 Degrees for the CPU,
    51 Degrees for the system,
    73 Degrees for the GPU (!)

    However, using the Everest utility, I get:

    Motherboard: 51 C
    CPU: 25 C
    AUX: 36 C
    GPU: 62 C
    GPU Ambient: 49 C

    The southbridge is so hot to the touch, that you can barely touch it.
    The southbridge itself is very hot, but the fins are quite cold. I am
    using a lian li case, so the motherboard is upside down - I assume this
    doesn't make a difference. Really confused by these results :(

    tom wrote:
    > Paul,
    >
    > thank you for your very informative contribution
    >
    > > outside of the board. Good luck figuring it all out :-)
    > He, he, I guess dying dumb in this case is the more simple way than tracing
    > for those temp sensors ;-)
    >
    > bye
    >
    > tom
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    On 1 Jul 2005 01:45:04 -0700, jgabbai@gmail.com wrote:

    >Hi,
    >
    >My A8N Sli premium is reporting temps of:
    >
    >36 Degrees for the CPU,
    >51 Degrees for the system,
    >73 Degrees for the GPU (!)
    >
    >However, using the Everest utility, I get:
    >
    >Motherboard: 51 C
    >CPU: 25 C
    >AUX: 36 C
    >GPU: 62 C
    >GPU Ambient: 49 C
    >
    >The southbridge is so hot to the touch, that you can barely touch it.
    >The southbridge itself is very hot, but the fins are quite cold. I am
    >using a lian li case, so the motherboard is upside down - I assume this
    >doesn't make a difference. Really confused by these results :(


    There's a thread in the A8N-SLI Premium group at the Asus.com forums
    in which a user says he's documented that mounting the motherboard
    upside down in Lian Li cases like the V1100 and V2100 leads to "rapid
    overheating of the chipset." My nForce chipset is JUST BARELY warm to
    the touch. I'd strongly suggest that you not run your A8N-SLI Premium
    in that configuration. I don't think the heatpipe cooling system
    works with the heatsink lower than the chipset. (There was a similar
    problem with positioning in the earlier heatpipe CPU heatsinks, and
    now some of the manufacturers advertise that their latest versions
    work in "any position." I deduce that Asus didn't implement this
    latest technology in the A8N-SLI Premium cooling system.)

    For me, Everest reports
    25° for the "CPU"
    36° for "Aux"
    41° for the "Motherboard"

    I strongly suspect that your CPU is 36° and that the "GPU" of 62°
    reading is actually a sensor in the nForce southbridge. It's too hot
    Your experience with the very hot southbridge rather confirms my
    suspicion that the second sensor on the A8N-SLI Premium ("motherboard"
    in Everest, Temp 2 in MBM, and "MB" in Asus Probe) is the chipset and
    that the sensor reported by Everest as CPU (not reported by Asus Probe
    at all but as ITE872F-3 in MBM) is actually a sensor on the
    motherboard that, for practical purposes, measures the case
    temperature. This third sensor closely approximates the room-air
    temperature in my setup.

    >tom wrote:
    >> Paul,
    >>
    >> thank you for your very informative contribution
    >>
    >> > outside of the board. Good luck figuring it all out :-)
    >> He, he, I guess dying dumb in this case is the more simple way than tracing
    >> for those temp sensors ;-)
    >>
    >> bye
    >>
    >> tom

    Ron
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    milleron wrote:
    > On Sat, 25 Jun 2005 20:55:19 -0600, "Mark A" <nobody@nowhere.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >>"milleron" <miller.90@osu.edu> wrote in message
    >>news:XFove.17119$pU.15838@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com...
    >>
    >>>The temps reported on my new A8N-SLI Premium right, but I'm hoping someone
    >>>can share his experience with me.
    >>>
    >>>I get these temperatures from three places: BIOS Hardware Monitor, Asus
    >>>Probe, and nVidia Monitor.
    >>>My CPU temp is reported as 25-29°C
    >>>My System temp is reported as 30-33°
    >>>My CPU is an Athlon 64 3500+ (Venice) and my CPU cooler is an XP120 with
    >>>the fan at 1850rpm.
    >>>Even on Sisoft Sandra's burn-in app, the temp won't go above 29° with a
    >>>room temp of about 23° and the case open.
    >>>Indeed, the entire heatsink is very cool to the touch.
    >>>
    >>>The CPU temp seems too low to be real. Compared to my other Asus board
    >>>(A7M266), the system temp seems to high to be correct. And it's difficult
    >>>to understand how the CPU temp could be lower than the system temp.
    >>>Anyone with the same hardware out there? What could be going on?
    >>
    >>Never look a gift horse in the mouth. Is the computer actually working? If
    >>so, enjoy.
    >>
    >
    > Yeah, it works great. It's just that I've never seen MB temps higher
    > than CPU temps before, so I'm very curious.
    > Ron

    My MB temp is 4 degrees higher than the CPU temp.
  14. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    On Sat, 02 Jul 2005 04:36:21 GMT, "non.sequitur"
    <non.sequitur@gmail.com> wrote:

    >milleron wrote:
    >> On Sat, 25 Jun 2005 20:55:19 -0600, "Mark A" <nobody@nowhere.com>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>"milleron" <miller.90@osu.edu> wrote in message
    >>>news:XFove.17119$pU.15838@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com...
    >>>
    >>>>The temps reported on my new A8N-SLI Premium right, but I'm hoping someone
    >>>>can share his experience with me.
    >>>>
    >>>>I get these temperatures from three places: BIOS Hardware Monitor, Asus
    >>>>Probe, and nVidia Monitor.
    >>>>My CPU temp is reported as 25-29°C
    >>>>My System temp is reported as 30-33°
    >>>>My CPU is an Athlon 64 3500+ (Venice) and my CPU cooler is an XP120 with
    >>>>the fan at 1850rpm.
    >>>>Even on Sisoft Sandra's burn-in app, the temp won't go above 29° with a
    >>>>room temp of about 23° and the case open.
    >>>>Indeed, the entire heatsink is very cool to the touch.
    >>>>
    >>>>The CPU temp seems too low to be real. Compared to my other Asus board
    >>>>(A7M266), the system temp seems to high to be correct. And it's difficult
    >>>>to understand how the CPU temp could be lower than the system temp.
    >>>>Anyone with the same hardware out there? What could be going on?
    >>>
    >>>Never look a gift horse in the mouth. Is the computer actually working? If
    >>>so, enjoy.
    >>>
    >>
    >> Yeah, it works great. It's just that I've never seen MB temps higher
    >> than CPU temps before, so I'm very curious.
    >> Ron
    >
    >My MB temp is 4 degrees higher than the CPU temp.

    Your "reported" "MB" temp is 4 degrees higher than CPU temp. Without
    active refrigeration, we all know that's impossible. I'm certain that
    what the BIOS and Probe label as "MB" temp is, in reality, the
    temperature of the nForce chipset. Users in the Anandtech
    Asus-motherboard forums have started referring to that higher temp as
    the "chipset" temp.


    Ron
  15. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "milleron" <millerdot90@SPAMlessosu.edu> wrote in message
    news:172ec1hc30fa8pc4aki8d29os1llrn10eq@4ax.com...
    > On Sat, 02 Jul 2005 04:36:21 GMT, "non.sequitur"
    > <non.sequitur@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >>milleron wrote:
    >>> On Sat, 25 Jun 2005 20:55:19 -0600, "Mark A" <nobody@nowhere.com>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>"milleron" <miller.90@osu.edu> wrote in message
    >>>>news:XFove.17119$pU.15838@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com...
    >>>>
    >>>>>The temps reported on my new A8N-SLI Premium right, but I'm hoping
    >>>>>someone
    >>>>>can share his experience with me.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>I get these temperatures from three places: BIOS Hardware Monitor,
    >>>>>Asus
    >>>>>Probe, and nVidia Monitor.
    >>>>>My CPU temp is reported as 25-29°C
    >>>>>My System temp is reported as 30-33°
    >>>>>My CPU is an Athlon 64 3500+ (Venice) and my CPU cooler is an XP120
    >>>>>with
    >>>>>the fan at 1850rpm.
    >>>>>Even on Sisoft Sandra's burn-in app, the temp won't go above 29° with a
    >>>>>room temp of about 23° and the case open.
    >>>>>Indeed, the entire heatsink is very cool to the touch.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>The CPU temp seems too low to be real. Compared to my other Asus board
    >>>>>(A7M266), the system temp seems to high to be correct. And it's
    >>>>>difficult
    >>>>>to understand how the CPU temp could be lower than the system temp.
    >>>>>Anyone with the same hardware out there? What could be going on?
    >>>>
    >>>>Never look a gift horse in the mouth. Is the computer actually working?
    >>>>If
    >>>>so, enjoy.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Yeah, it works great. It's just that I've never seen MB temps higher
    >>> than CPU temps before, so I'm very curious.
    >>> Ron
    >>
    >>My MB temp is 4 degrees higher than the CPU temp.
    >
    > Your "reported" "MB" temp is 4 degrees higher than CPU temp. Without
    > active refrigeration, we all know that's impossible. I'm certain that
    > what the BIOS and Probe label as "MB" temp is, in reality, the
    > temperature of the nForce chipset. Users in the Anandtech
    > Asus-motherboard forums have started referring to that higher temp as
    > the "chipset" temp.
    >
    >
    > Ron


    Why is that impossible? On a 'dip your finger' test, the base of the CPU
    heatsink and the underside of the mobo are cool to touch. i.e. the same as
    anywhere else on the board. When the case is closed, airflow inside the case
    is not as free as when open and pockets of warm air develop.

    The sensors on my Superflower fan master also back this up. The current
    inside case temp is 33c (round the hard disks which are cooled by a fan at
    the front of the case) and 36c just above the graphics card. The CPU idles
    at 30c.

    More empirical than scientific but good enough for me :-)
  16. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    So what you guys are saying is that there is some kind of bug in the hard or
    software of this motherboard ?

    (The sensors got mixed ?)

    Bye,
    Skybuck.

    "milleron" <millerdot90@SPAMlessosu.edu> wrote in message
    news:03dbc15lb56b3ieovesu29ufihvans1a50@4ax.com...
    > On 1 Jul 2005 01:45:04 -0700, jgabbai@gmail.com wrote:
    >
    > >Hi,
    > >
    > >My A8N Sli premium is reporting temps of:
    > >
    > >36 Degrees for the CPU,
    > >51 Degrees for the system,
    > >73 Degrees for the GPU (!)
    > >
    > >However, using the Everest utility, I get:
    > >
    > >Motherboard: 51 C
    > >CPU: 25 C
    > >AUX: 36 C
    > >GPU: 62 C
    > >GPU Ambient: 49 C
    > >
    > >The southbridge is so hot to the touch, that you can barely touch it.
    > >The southbridge itself is very hot, but the fins are quite cold. I am
    > >using a lian li case, so the motherboard is upside down - I assume this
    > >doesn't make a difference. Really confused by these results :(
    >
    >
    > There's a thread in the A8N-SLI Premium group at the Asus.com forums
    > in which a user says he's documented that mounting the motherboard
    > upside down in Lian Li cases like the V1100 and V2100 leads to "rapid
    > overheating of the chipset." My nForce chipset is JUST BARELY warm to
    > the touch. I'd strongly suggest that you not run your A8N-SLI Premium
    > in that configuration. I don't think the heatpipe cooling system
    > works with the heatsink lower than the chipset. (There was a similar
    > problem with positioning in the earlier heatpipe CPU heatsinks, and
    > now some of the manufacturers advertise that their latest versions
    > work in "any position." I deduce that Asus didn't implement this
    > latest technology in the A8N-SLI Premium cooling system.)
    >
    > For me, Everest reports
    > 25° for the "CPU"
    > 36° for "Aux"
    > 41° for the "Motherboard"
    >
    > I strongly suspect that your CPU is 36° and that the "GPU" of 62°
    > reading is actually a sensor in the nForce southbridge. It's too hot
    > Your experience with the very hot southbridge rather confirms my
    > suspicion that the second sensor on the A8N-SLI Premium ("motherboard"
    > in Everest, Temp 2 in MBM, and "MB" in Asus Probe) is the chipset and
    > that the sensor reported by Everest as CPU (not reported by Asus Probe
    > at all but as ITE872F-3 in MBM) is actually a sensor on the
    > motherboard that, for practical purposes, measures the case
    > temperature. This third sensor closely approximates the room-air
    > temperature in my setup.
    >
    > >tom wrote:
    > >> Paul,
    > >>
    > >> thank you for your very informative contribution
    > >>
    > >> > outside of the board. Good luck figuring it all out :-)
    > >> He, he, I guess dying dumb in this case is the more simple way than
    tracing
    > >> for those temp sensors ;-)
    > >>
    > >> bye
    > >>
    > >> tom
    >
    > Ron
  17. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "" wrote:
    > So what you guys are saying is that there is some kind of bug
    > in the hard or
    > software of this motherboard ?
    >
    > (The sensors got mixed ?)
    >
    > Bye,
    > Skybuck.
    >
    > "milleron" <millerdot90@SPAMlessosu.edu> wrote in message
    > news:03dbc15lb56b3ieovesu29ufihvans1a50@4ax.com...
    > > On 1 Jul 2005 01:45:04 -0700, jgabbai@gmail.com wrote:
    > >
    > > >Hi,
    > > >
    > > >My A8N Sli premium is reporting temps of:
    > > >
    > > >36 Degrees for the CPU,
    > > >51 Degrees for the system,
    > > >73 Degrees for the GPU (!)
    > > >
    > > >However, using the Everest utility, I get:
    > > >
    > > >Motherboard: 51 C
    > > >CPU: 25 C
    > > >AUX: 36 C
    > > >GPU: 62 C
    > > >GPU Ambient: 49 C
    > > >
    > > >The southbridge is so hot to the touch, that you can barely
    > touch it.
    > > >The southbridge itself is very hot, but the fins are quite
    > cold. I am
    > > >using a lian li case, so the motherboard is upside down - I
    > assume this
    > > >doesn't make a difference. Really confused by these results
    > :(
    > >
    > >
    > > There's a thread in the A8N-SLI Premium group at the Asus.com forums
    > > in which a user says he's documented that mounting the
    > motherboard
    > > upside down in Lian Li cases like the V1100 and V2100 leads
    > to "rapid
    > > overheating of the chipset." My nForce chipset is JUST
    > BARELY warm to
    > > the touch. I'd strongly suggest that you not run your
    > A8N-SLI Premium
    > > in that configuration. I don't think the heatpipe cooling
    > system
    > > works with the heatsink lower than the chipset. (There was
    > a similar
    > > problem with positioning in the earlier heatpipe CPU
    > heatsinks, and
    > > now some of the manufacturers advertise that their latest
    > versions
    > > work in "any position." I deduce that Asus didn't implement
    > this
    > > latest technology in the A8N-SLI Premium cooling system.)
    > >
    > > For me, Everest reports
    > > 25° for the "CPU"
    > > 36° for "Aux"
    > > 41° for the "Motherboard"
    > >
    > > I strongly suspect that your CPU is 36° and that the "GPU"
    > of 62°
    > > reading is actually a sensor in the nForce southbridge.
    > It's too hot
    > > Your experience with the very hot southbridge rather
    > confirms my
    > > suspicion that the second sensor on the A8N-SLI Premium
    > ("motherboard"
    > > in Everest, Temp 2 in MBM, and "MB" in Asus Probe) is the
    > chipset and
    > > that the sensor reported by Everest as CPU (not reported by
    > Asus Probe
    > > at all but as ITE872F-3 in MBM) is actually a sensor on the
    > > motherboard that, for practical purposes, measures the case
    > > temperature. This third sensor closely approximates the
    > room-air
    > > temperature in my setup.
    > >
    > > >tom wrote:
    > > >> Paul,
    > > >>
    > > >> thank you for your very informative contribution
    > > >>
    > > >> > outside of the board. Good luck figuring it all out :-)
    > > >> He, he, I guess dying dumb in this case is the more
    > simple way than
    > tracing
    > > >> for those temp sensors ;-)
    > > >>
    > > >> bye
    > > >>
    > > >> tom
    > >
    > > Ron

    i’m thinking of getting the a8n sli premium as well, Just today, i
    discovered from forums that there might be a temperature problem with
    this heat pipe. It’s kinda understandable because the heat pipe is not
    horizontal. So if it’s inverted, the heated air from the chip won’t
    get out easily. That being said, is it easy to remove the heat pipe
    cooling system, and replace it wth an air cool ? or maybe a water
    cool? i had a chipset water block from my old system. Maybe i could
    move it onto this board?

    Kenneth

    --
    Posted using the http://www.hardwareforumz.com interface, at author's request
    Articles individually checked for conformance to usenet standards
    Topic URL: http://www.hardwareforumz.com/ASUS-A8N-SLI-Premium-reported-temps-ftopict58026.html
    Visit Topic URL to contact author (reg. req'd). Report abuse: http://www.hardwareforumz.com/eform.php?p=300464
  18. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    jgabbai@gmail.com wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > My A8N Sli premium is reporting temps of:
    >
    > 36 Degrees for the CPU,
    > 51 Degrees for the system,
    > 73 Degrees for the GPU (!)
    >
    > However, using the Everest utility, I get:
    >
    > Motherboard: 51 C
    > CPU: 25 C
    > AUX: 36 C
    > GPU: 62 C
    > GPU Ambient: 49 C
    >
    > The southbridge is so hot to the touch, that you can barely touch it.
    > The southbridge itself is very hot, but the fins are quite cold. I am
    > using a lian li case, so the motherboard is upside down - I assume this
    > doesn't make a difference. Really confused by these results :(

    A heatpipe works like this: the fluid inside gets hot, the rises up to
    the top to cool down, then descends again to be re-heated, thus creating
    a flow inside the pipe. Mounting the pipe upside down will diminish it's
    working, as the hot fluid will then rise to the top - where it already
    was, so it won't be able to transport the heat away from the source. The
    hot part of the pipe *must* be the lowest part, and the heatsink *must*
    be on the highest part of the pipe for it to work properly.

    I short: mounting the A8N Premium board upside down could fry your chipset.

    Now for my temps. I have a Deluxe board. My temps (using a Zalman 7700)
    as reported by the ASUS util, used to be (idle):
    39 for the CPU (65 stressed)
    39 for the board (43 stressed)
    59 for the GPU's (74 stressed)

    I installed watercooling this week (CPU, chipset and both SLI cards),
    with near-silent papst fans. My idle temps now are:
    30 for the CPU (47 stressed)
    41 for the board (42 stressed)
    42 for the GPU's (44 stressed)

    BTW, Everest now reports:
    33 for the CPU
    42 for the board
    38 for the GPU / 35 ambient
    31 for the second GPU / 33 ambient
    40 for one of the HD's
  19. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    GSV Three Minds in a Can wrote:

    > The fluid actually =boils=, soaking up latent heat
    > of vaporisation, and the vapour condenses (releasing the same latent
    > heat) at the cold end, and then runs back (or is wicked back) to the hot
    > end.

    True, the heat is taken into the fluid by vaporisation, and released by
    condensation. That's how the energy gets taken into and released from
    the pipe. But the pipe has to do something else too: transport it. The
    vapour has to go to the cold end, and the fluid to the hot end. Hot
    vapour tends to rise. So I don't see how an upside down heatpipe will
    get the hot vapour to go DOWN and the cold liquid to go UP. There might
    be some small flow out of pressure differences in the pipe, but I doubt
    it will work as efficient as it will when the heat is taken up in the
    lowest part and released at the top.
  20. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "" wrote:
    > GSV Three Minds in a Can wrote:
    >
    > > The fluid actually =boils=, soaking up latent heat
    > > of vaporisation, and the vapour condenses (releasing the
    > same latent
    > > heat) at the cold end, and then runs back (or is wicked
    > back) to the hot
    > > end.
    >
    > True, the heat is taken into the fluid by vaporisation, and
    > released by
    > condensation. That's how the energy gets taken into and
    > released from
    > the pipe. But the pipe has to do something else too: transport
    > it. The
    > vapour has to go to the cold end, and the fluid to the hot
    > end. Hot
    > vapour tends to rise. So I don't see how an upside down
    > heatpipe will
    > get the hot vapour to go DOWN and the cold liquid to go UP.
    > There might
    > be some small flow out of pressure differences in the pipe,
    > but I doubt
    > it will work as efficient as it will when the heat is taken up
    > in the
    > lowest part and released at the top.

    I’m gonna have to second that. In fact, i think it’ll work even worse
    than air cooling because all the heated air is "trapped" at the top
    end of the pipe. Due to the pressure gradient (the heated ones being
    the low pressure), the only way the heat can escape, will be like an
    uphill battle, pushing its way down to the heat sink where the
    pressure is higher.

    It’s like a classic case of working against nature.

    For those who got this inverted setup working, i believe, you would be
    getting an even better result if you have it the other way around.

    From what i’m seeing, the only is to replace the pipe with h20 or the
    g’old air.

    Kenneth

    --
    Posted using the http://www.hardwareforumz.com interface, at author's request
    Articles individually checked for conformance to usenet standards
    Topic URL: http://www.hardwareforumz.com/ASUS-A8N-SLI-Premium-reported-temps-ftopict58026.html
    Visit Topic URL to contact author (reg. req'd). Report abuse: http://www.hardwareforumz.com/eform.php?p=301004
  21. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Bitstring
    <7_301004_636b4210d1c64f82c178657b457df3fe@hardwareforumz.com>, from the
    wonderful person kenn <UseLinkToEmail@HardwareForumz.com> said
    >"" wrote:
    > > GSV Three Minds in a Can wrote:
    > >
    > > > The fluid actually =boils=, soaking up latent heat
    > > > of vaporisation, and the vapour condenses (releasing the
    > > same latent
    > > > heat) at the cold end, and then runs back (or is wicked
    > > back) to the hot
    > > > end.
    > >
    > > True, the heat is taken into the fluid by vaporisation, and
    > > released by
    > > condensation. That's how the energy gets taken into and
    > > released from
    > > the pipe. But the pipe has to do something else too: transport
    > > it. The
    > > vapour has to go to the cold end, and the fluid to the hot
    > > end. Hot
    > > vapour tends to rise. So I don't see how an upside down
    > > heatpipe will
    > > get the hot vapour to go DOWN and the cold liquid to go UP.
    > > There might
    > > be some small flow out of pressure differences in the pipe,
    > > but I doubt
    > > it will work as efficient as it will when the heat is taken up
    > > in the
    > > lowest part and released at the top.
    >
    >I'm gonna have to second that. In fact, i think it'll work even worse
    >than air cooling because all the heated air is "trapped" at the top
    >end of the pipe.

    Air - what air? The pipe is filled with (or should be) working fluid
    plus vapour of working fluid. Ain't no stinking air!

    >Due to the pressure gradient (the heated ones being
    >the low pressure), the only way the heat can escape, will be like an
    >uphill battle, pushing its way down to the heat sink where the
    >pressure is higher.

    At the heatsink end the vapour condenses into liquid. The pressure is
    thus way lower, so more vapour rushes in.

    Look, hook your kettle spout up to your freezer .. all the heat
    generated by boiling the water =will= wind up in the freezer (along with
    all the water that was in the kettle) whether the freezer was up, down,
    or sideways.. The only trick with a heatpipe is that you need to get the
    water back into the kettle (continuously) .. and picking a better
    working fluid than water.

    --
    GSV Three Minds in a Can
    Contact recommends the use of Firefox; SC recommends it at gunpoint.
  22. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "" wrote:
    > Bitstring
    > <7_301004_636b4210d1c64f82c178657b457df3fe@hardwareforumz.com>,
    > from the
    > wonderful person kenn <UseLinkToEmail@HardwareForumz.com> said
    > >"" wrote:
    > > > GSV Three Minds in a Can wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > The fluid actually =boils=, soaking up latent heat
    > > > > of vaporisation, and the vapour condenses (releasing the
    > > > same latent
    > > > > heat) at the cold end, and then runs back (or is wicked
    > > > back) to the hot
    > > > > end.
    > > >
    > > > True, the heat is taken into the fluid by vaporisation,
    > and
    > > > released by
    > > > condensation. That's how the energy gets taken into and
    > > > released from
    > > > the pipe. But the pipe has to do something else too:
    > transport
    > > > it. The
    > > > vapour has to go to the cold end, and the fluid to the hot
    > > > end. Hot
    > > > vapour tends to rise. So I don't see how an upside down
    > > > heatpipe will
    > > > get the hot vapour to go DOWN and the cold liquid to go
    > UP.
    > > > There might
    > > > be some small flow out of pressure differences in the
    > pipe,
    > > > but I doubt
    > > > it will work as efficient as it will when the heat is
    > taken up
    > > > in the
    > > > lowest part and released at the top.
    > >
    > >I'm gonna have to second that. In fact, i think it'll work
    > even worse
    > >than air cooling because all the heated air is "trapped" at
    > the top
    > >end of the pipe.
    >
    > Air - what air? The pipe is filled with (or should be) working
    > fluid
    > plus vapour of working fluid. Ain't no stinking air!
    >
    > >Due to the pressure gradient (the heated ones being
    > >the low pressure), the only way the heat can escape, will be
    > like an
    > >uphill battle, pushing its way down to the heat sink where
    > the
    > >pressure is higher.
    >
    > At the heatsink end the vapour condenses into liquid. The
    > pressure is
    > thus way lower, so more vapour rushes in.
    >
    > Look, hook your kettle spout up to your freezer .. all the
    > heat
    > generated by boiling the water =will= wind up in the freezer
    > (along with
    > all the water that was in the kettle) whether the freezer was
    > up, down,
    > or sideways.. The only trick with a heatpipe is that you need
    > to get the
    > water back into the kettle (continuously) .. and picking a
    > better
    > working fluid than water.
    >
    > --
    > GSV Three Minds in a Can
    > Contact recommends the use of Firefox; SC recommends it at
    > gunpoint.

    OK, so it’s vapor, instead of heated air. The general conclusion is
    still the same - the fluid is on the wrong end of the pipe. It just
    won’t work. But one thing for sure - the pipe can’t be all filled with
    fluid, otherwise, how would there be room for vapor.

    Just that it’s such a waste that i have to replace this with a water
    block. After all it’s one of the "feature enhancement" over the
    deluxe version that they boost on every review.

    Kenneth

    --
    Posted using the http://www.hardwareforumz.com interface, at author's request
    Articles individually checked for conformance to usenet standards
    Topic URL: http://www.hardwareforumz.com/ASUS-A8N-SLI-Premium-reported-temps-ftopict58026.html
    Visit Topic URL to contact author (reg. req'd). Report abuse: http://www.hardwareforumz.com/eform.php?p=301103
  23. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Bitstring
    <7_301103_acca8e583aa086f43ae4925e1e69d447@hardwareforumz.com>, from the
    wonderful person kenn <UseLinkToEmail@HardwareForumz.com> said
    <snip>
    >OK, so it's vapor, instead of heated air. The general conclusion is
    >still the same - the fluid is on the wrong end of the pipe. It just
    >won't work. But one thing for sure - the pipe can't be all filled with
    >fluid, otherwise, how would there be room for vapor.

    Yep, the amount of fluid (liquid) in the system is critical - too much
    or too little and it won't work properly.

    >Just that it's such a waste that i have to replace this with a water
    >block. After all it's one of the "feature enhancement" over the
    >deluxe version that they boost on every review.

    I'm quite prepared to believe that ASUS have (once again) delivered a
    marketing gimmick instead or proper engineering. Much as I love them,
    the 40mm chipset fan (e.g. on the A7V133s) was a joke, more so since the
    HS part was stuck to the (concave!) top of the chip package with double
    sided sticky tape or similar.

    Not sure I'd bother with water cooling though - people seem to manage
    just fine with a (proper, properly attached) passive HS.

    --
    GSV Three Minds in a Can
    Contact recommends the use of Firefox; SC recommends it at gunpoint.
  24. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    GSV Three Minds in a Can wrote:
    >
    > Excuse me, the =fluid= does =NOT= rise. Vapour rises - or actually
    > 'travels' - to wherever the cold end happens to be. And yes, then the
    > fluid that it condenses to has to be sent back (which may, but does not
    > have to be, 'descending').

    Vapour - in a closed pipe filled with fluid.

    Oh, and if there is room for vapour - guess what happens if I heat only
    the top bit.

    Good luck with that Masters.

    RJT.
  25. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 00:19:54 +0100, GSV Three Minds in a Can
    <GSV@quik.clara.co.uk> wrote:

    >Bitstring
    ><7_301103_acca8e583aa086f43ae4925e1e69d447@hardwareforumz.com>, from the
    >wonderful person kenn <UseLinkToEmail@HardwareForumz.com> said
    ><snip>
    >>OK, so it’s vapor, instead of heated air. The general conclusion is
    >>still the same - the fluid is on the wrong end of the pipe. It just
    >>won’t work. But one thing for sure - the pipe can’t be all filled with
    >>fluid, otherwise, how would there be room for vapor.
    >
    >Yep, the amount of fluid (liquid) in the system is critical - too much
    >or too little and it won't work properly.
    >
    >>Just that it’s such a waste that i have to replace this with a water
    >>block. After all it’s one of the "feature enhancement" over the
    >>deluxe version that they boost on every review.
    >
    >I'm quite prepared to believe that ASUS have (once again) delivered a
    >marketing gimmick instead or proper engineering.

    Nah, the heatpipe cooling on the A8N-SLI Premium is engineered
    perfectly and works perfectly for the VAST majority of owners. It
    looks a lot more likely that there are simply some manufacturing
    defects out there. All boards, no matter how well engineered, have a
    few DOAs simply because errors in manufacturing are inevitable on some
    scale.

    snip

    Ron
  26. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    GSV Three Minds in a Can wrote:

    > Your heatpipe doesn't work unless the condensed working fluid can get
    > (back) to the hot end (or close enough to be vaporised), and the vapour
    > can get to the cool end (or close enough to condense). That's where
    > wicks &/or gravity come in.

    Gravity on vapour vs gravity on liquid, in an upsidedown heatpipe. Cool.
    I'll stick with my advice:

    >> Good luck with that Masters.

    RJT, 35, LL.M.
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