Dual Channel memory question

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

I decided to upgrade my system with an Asus A8V Deluxe board, Athlon
64 3200+ venice processor and 1 gig (2x512) Corsair valueselect DDR
400 ram. I haven't received the components from Newegg yet, but woud
like to know before I get it (and can't go online to ask...) if there
might be any problems with setup I need to look out for. And also -
how do you install the Ram for dual-channel use?

Is the manual clear enough to walk me through setting up the bios, or
is it like defaults or something?

Any help appreciated.

Thanks.
16 answers Last reply
More about dual channel memory question
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <hqb4d1hne8g9rffr78vl9snl8q70t7gdbo@4ax.com>, ChowBoy
    <BadBoyz@chowder.net> wrote:

    > I decided to upgrade my system with an Asus A8V Deluxe board, Athlon
    > 64 3200+ venice processor and 1 gig (2x512) Corsair valueselect DDR
    > 400 ram. I haven't received the components from Newegg yet, but woud
    > like to know before I get it (and can't go online to ask...) if there
    > might be any problems with setup I need to look out for. And also -
    > how do you install the Ram for dual-channel use?
    >
    > Is the manual clear enough to walk me through setting up the bios, or
    > is it like defaults or something?
    >
    > Any help appreciated.
    >
    > Thanks.

    If you have problems, put one stick in slot B1. The B1 and B2 slots
    are on the primary 64 bit bus, and in some cases, if the BIOS code
    in the flash chip is not recent enough for the processor stepping
    used, sticking just one DIMM in slot B1 may allow the board to POST.

    (Look up A8V via the search box - venice = Rev.e ???)
    http://support.asus.com.tw/cpusupport/cpusupport.aspx?SLanguage=en-us

    Newegg lists ADA3200DAA4BP and ADA3200BPBOX for Venice.

    It looks like rev.e, so minimum BIOS revision 1011 will be needed.
    http://www.amdcompare.com/us-en/desktop/details.aspx?opn=ADA3200DAA4BP

    Generally, Asus boards are pretty good on their selection of
    default conditions, so there is no pressing need to read the
    manual :-)

    Paul
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    With my A8N-SLI Deluxe all you do is put it in two colored coded memory
    slots and it runs automatically in dual channel mode.

    --
    Nocturnal

    http://www.spywaretalk.org


    "ChowBoy" <BadBoyz@chowder.net> wrote in message
    news:hqb4d1hne8g9rffr78vl9snl8q70t7gdbo@4ax.com...
    >I decided to upgrade my system with an Asus A8V Deluxe board, Athlon
    > 64 3200+ venice processor and 1 gig (2x512) Corsair valueselect DDR
    > 400 ram. I haven't received the components from Newegg yet, but woud
    > like to know before I get it (and can't go online to ask...) if there
    > might be any problems with setup I need to look out for. And also -
    > how do you install the Ram for dual-channel use?
    >
    > Is the manual clear enough to walk me through setting up the bios, or
    > is it like defaults or something?
    >
    > Any help appreciated.
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Paul,

    Thanks for your reply. And thanks for showing me how to find what I
    need on the ASUS web site. I downloaded Bios version 1013 and saved
    to floppy. Will that work if I have to flash the Bios? And does one
    use the CD tools to do this?

    Also, regarding inserting the RAM: do I put one module each in B1 and
    B2 slots for dual channel? I think reading about this has confused me.
    I am not sure just how to put the memory in.

    Thanks again.

    ChowBoy

    >If you have problems, put one stick in slot B1. The B1 and B2 slots
    >are on the primary 64 bit bus, and in some cases, if the BIOS code
    >in the flash chip is not recent enough for the processor stepping
    >used, sticking just one DIMM in slot B1 may allow the board to POST.
    >
    >Generally, Asus boards are pretty good on their selection of
    >default conditions, so there is no pressing need to read the
    >manual :-)
    >
    > Paul
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <80g5d1pf2b8prve14h9p9hcejrpg2qphg2@4ax.com>, ChowBoy
    <BadBoyz@chowder.net> wrote:

    > Paul,
    >
    > Thanks for your reply. And thanks for showing me how to find what I
    > need on the ASUS web site. I downloaded Bios version 1013 and saved
    > to floppy. Will that work if I have to flash the Bios? And does one
    > use the CD tools to do this?
    >
    > Also, regarding inserting the RAM: do I put one module each in B1 and
    > B2 slots for dual channel? I think reading about this has confused me.
    > I am not sure just how to put the memory in.
    >
    > Thanks again.
    >
    > ChowBoy

    A matched pair in A2 & B2 is dual channel.
    A matched pair in A1 & B1 is dual channel.

    If running single channel, only B1 or B2 or both can be used for that.

    A1 and A2 will not work by themselves.

    Paul

    >
    > >If you have problems, put one stick in slot B1. The B1 and B2 slots
    > >are on the primary 64 bit bus, and in some cases, if the BIOS code
    > >in the flash chip is not recent enough for the processor stepping
    > >used, sticking just one DIMM in slot B1 may allow the board to POST.
    > >
    > >Generally, Asus boards are pretty good on their selection of
    > >default conditions, so there is no pressing need to read the
    > >manual :-)
    > >
    > > Paul
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Thank you both so much for your help and *clear* explanations. I think
    I have a handle on it now, but if I encounter any problems please be
    on standby - ha.

    Bob - thanks for the info on d/ling the mobo manual from the web site.
    I will go there now and try to find it.

    I just wanted to be as informed as I can before I try to attempt this
    setup, since it's all new to me and sure don't want to screw up new
    equipment....

    Thanks again.

    ChowBoy
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    The manual is pretty clear on configuring the RAM. If you want to look at it
    before your hardware arrives, it is available for download from
    support.asus.com.

    The short answer: if you're using only two DIMMs, put them in the two blue
    slots. (Those are A1 and B1.)

    As Paul remarked, if you have trouble, put a single stick in B1 (the blue
    slot farthest from the CPU socket). That is recommended if the current BIOS
    is too old to support your CPU. It ought to permit you to boot the machine
    and update the BIOS. That is the only recommended configuration that runs in
    single channel mode. According to Asus, you need BIOS 1011 or later to
    support a 3200+ Venice, but I have read claims that you'd be able to boot
    using that CPU and any released BIOS version. Please post if you have any
    trouble.

    The manual also tells you how to flash the BIOS.

    My preferred method is the old-fashioned one:

    Download the flash utility AFUDOS. (I believe that the latest version is
    2.11.)

    On an XP (or Win98 or ME) machine, format a floppy as an MS-DOS boot disk.

    Extract AFUDOS and the BIOS file onto the floppy.

    Restart the machine. Go into the BIOS settings, and set the floppy as the
    boot device.

    When the machine boots from the floppy, run AFUDOS. If you run it by itself,
    it'll give a list of commands and switches. One of the switches will allow
    you to backup the current BIOS to a file. Doing that may be a good idea,
    although most versions of the BIOS are still available for download.

    The syntax for flashing the BIOS is:

    afudos /i(filename),

    where (filename) is the, er, file name of the BIOS file. That does the whole
    job; no other user inputs are required.

    If you don't want to mess around with a boot floppy, the EZFlash method
    might be more to your taste. I haven't used it, but it looks simple enough.

    Address scrambled. Replace nkbob with bobkn.

    "ChowBoy" <BadBoyz@chowder.net> wrote in message
    news:80g5d1pf2b8prve14h9p9hcejrpg2qphg2@4ax.com...
    > Paul,
    >
    > Thanks for your reply. And thanks for showing me how to find what I
    > need on the ASUS web site. I downloaded Bios version 1013 and saved
    > to floppy. Will that work if I have to flash the Bios? And does one
    > use the CD tools to do this?
    >
    > Also, regarding inserting the RAM: do I put one module each in B1 and
    > B2 slots for dual channel? I think reading about this has confused me.
    > I am not sure just how to put the memory in.
    >
    > Thanks again.
    >
    > ChowBoy
    >
    >>If you have problems, put one stick in slot B1. The B1 and B2 slots
    >>are on the primary 64 bit bus, and in some cases, if the BIOS code
    >>in the flash chip is not recent enough for the processor stepping
    >>used, sticking just one DIMM in slot B1 may allow the board to POST.
    >>
    >>Generally, Asus boards are pretty good on their selection of
    >>default conditions, so there is no pressing need to read the
    >>manual :-)
    >>
    >> Paul
    >
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    I'm glad that I found this post because I recently spoke with ASUS tech
    support regarding my A8V Deluxe.

    Tech support insists that the manual is misprinted and that memory
    should be inserted into the black slots first to enable dual-channel
    mode. I'm having AGP issues when the board is enabled for 8x and this
    was one of the solutions that they suggested. I know that this is
    off-topic, but wanted to make sure that I passed the word along because
    a misprint can be dangerous:)
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
    news:nospam-1107051731170001@192.168.1.178...
    > In article <80g5d1pf2b8prve14h9p9hcejrpg2qphg2@4ax.com>, ChowBoy
    > <BadBoyz@chowder.net> wrote:
    >
    >> Paul,
    >>
    >> Thanks for your reply. And thanks for showing me how to find what I
    >> need on the ASUS web site. I downloaded Bios version 1013 and saved
    >> to floppy. Will that work if I have to flash the Bios? And does one
    >> use the CD tools to do this?
    >>
    >> Also, regarding inserting the RAM: do I put one module each in B1 and
    >> B2 slots for dual channel? I think reading about this has confused me.
    >> I am not sure just how to put the memory in.
    >>
    >> Thanks again.
    >>
    >> ChowBoy
    >
    > A matched pair in A2 & B2 is dual channel.
    > A matched pair in A1 & B1 is dual channel.
    >
    > If running single channel, only B1 or B2 or both can be used for that.
    >
    > A1 and A2 will not work by themselves.
    >
    > Paul
    >

    Ok, so now I have a super noob question! For dual channel, do you need to
    buy specialty 'dual-channel' RAM? Or will any DDR400 RAM work (I'm thinking
    2 sticks of 512MB normal Kingston DDR 400 here)? By your mention of 'matched
    pair', I assume the two sticks must be the same model from the same
    manufacturer. Is this true?

    Many, many thanks.
    -DC

    >>
    >> >If you have problems, put one stick in slot B1. The B1 and B2 slots
    >> >are on the primary 64 bit bus, and in some cases, if the BIOS code
    >> >in the flash chip is not recent enough for the processor stepping
    >> >used, sticking just one DIMM in slot B1 may allow the board to POST.
    >> >
    >> >Generally, Asus boards are pretty good on their selection of
    >> >default conditions, so there is no pressing need to read the
    >> >manual :-)
    >> >
    >> > Paul
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <42d3a9e4$1@dnews.tpgi.com.au>, "Dragoncarer"
    <notrightnow@oops.haha> wrote:

    > "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
    > news:nospam-1107051731170001@192.168.1.178...
    > > In article <80g5d1pf2b8prve14h9p9hcejrpg2qphg2@4ax.com>, ChowBoy
    > > <BadBoyz@chowder.net> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Paul,
    > >>
    > >> Thanks for your reply. And thanks for showing me how to find what I
    > >> need on the ASUS web site. I downloaded Bios version 1013 and saved
    > >> to floppy. Will that work if I have to flash the Bios? And does one
    > >> use the CD tools to do this?
    > >>
    > >> Also, regarding inserting the RAM: do I put one module each in B1 and
    > >> B2 slots for dual channel? I think reading about this has confused me.
    > >> I am not sure just how to put the memory in.
    > >>
    > >> Thanks again.
    > >>
    > >> ChowBoy
    > >
    > > A matched pair in A2 & B2 is dual channel.
    > > A matched pair in A1 & B1 is dual channel.
    > >
    > > If running single channel, only B1 or B2 or both can be used for that.
    > >
    > > A1 and A2 will not work by themselves.
    > >
    > > Paul
    > >
    >
    > Ok, so now I have a super noob question! For dual channel, do you need to
    > buy specialty 'dual-channel' RAM? Or will any DDR400 RAM work (I'm thinking
    > 2 sticks of 512MB normal Kingston DDR 400 here)? By your mention of 'matched
    > pair', I assume the two sticks must be the same model from the same
    > manufacturer. Is this true?
    >
    > Many, many thanks.
    > -DC
    >

    If you shop around, there is no excuse for a price premium for
    "dual channel" packaged parts. If you pay $80 for one module,
    the dual channel packaged parts should be $160. All they are
    doing, is taking two modules from the same production batch,
    and putting them in a package. There is no "magic" testing
    to establish a match - what you are getting, is two modules
    that use exactly the same brand of chips. And the contents of
    the SPD chips on the modules should match as well. They
    are physically identical, without being "tuned" in any special
    way. (A guy reaches into a barrel, picks two modules at random,
    and slaps them into a package.)

    The hardware doesn't care about a number of design issues
    with DIMMs. But, if you mix different brands of modules,
    it is hard to say whether the Asus BIOS will always do the
    right thing (like say one of the DIMMs is missing some
    critical data from the SPD chip - the BIOS could be very
    confused). If you want to take chances by buying different
    modules, make sure the vendor has a good returns policy on
    RAM, so you can arrange a swap if necessary.

    Now, if you really go crazy, and buy a 16 chip DIMM and an
    8 chip DIMM (single sided), both 512MB, that is just asking
    for trouble. In that case, that does represent a hardware
    difference, and the hardware signals needed to address those
    two DIMMs will require a different pattern. I doubt the
    Athlon64 would be very happy about a difference like that.
    At least, that is not a combo I would sink my money into :-)

    If you wish to investigate this for yourself, sometimes you
    can find a datasheet that explains the matching requirements.
    This is a good place to start for Athlon64 - see section 4.1.4
    on page 178 "DIMM Matching Algorithm":

    http://www.amd.com/us-en/assets/content_type/white_papers_and_tech_docs/26094.PDF

    Paul
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    On Tue, 12 Jul 2005 11:45:27 -0400, nospam@needed.com (Paul) wrote:

    >In article <42d3a9e4$1@dnews.tpgi.com.au>, "Dragoncarer"
    ><notrightnow@oops.haha> wrote:
    >
    >> "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
    >> news:nospam-1107051731170001@192.168.1.178...
    >> > In article <80g5d1pf2b8prve14h9p9hcejrpg2qphg2@4ax.com>, ChowBoy
    >> > <BadBoyz@chowder.net> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> Paul,
    >> >>
    >> >> Thanks for your reply. And thanks for showing me how to find what I
    >> >> need on the ASUS web site. I downloaded Bios version 1013 and saved
    >> >> to floppy. Will that work if I have to flash the Bios? And does one
    >> >> use the CD tools to do this?
    >> >>
    >> >> Also, regarding inserting the RAM: do I put one module each in B1 and
    >> >> B2 slots for dual channel? I think reading about this has confused me.
    >> >> I am not sure just how to put the memory in.
    >> >>
    >> >> Thanks again.
    >> >>
    >> >> ChowBoy
    >> >
    >> > A matched pair in A2 & B2 is dual channel.
    >> > A matched pair in A1 & B1 is dual channel.
    >> >
    >> > If running single channel, only B1 or B2 or both can be used for that.
    >> >
    >> > A1 and A2 will not work by themselves.
    >> >
    >> > Paul
    >> >
    >>
    >> Ok, so now I have a super noob question! For dual channel, do you need to
    >> buy specialty 'dual-channel' RAM? Or will any DDR400 RAM work (I'm thinking
    >> 2 sticks of 512MB normal Kingston DDR 400 here)? By your mention of 'matched
    >> pair', I assume the two sticks must be the same model from the same
    >> manufacturer. Is this true?
    >>
    >> Many, many thanks.
    >> -DC
    >>
    >
    >If you shop around, there is no excuse for a price premium for
    >"dual channel" packaged parts. If you pay $80 for one module,
    >the dual channel packaged parts should be $160. All they are
    >doing, is taking two modules from the same production batch,
    >and putting them in a package. There is no "magic" testing
    >to establish a match - what you are getting, is two modules
    >that use exactly the same brand of chips. And the contents of
    >the SPD chips on the modules should match as well. They
    >are physically identical, without being "tuned" in any special
    >way. (A guy reaches into a barrel, picks two modules at random,
    >and slaps them into a package.)

    When Corsair came out with their TwinX modules, they did, in fact test
    them together to make sure they were matched and would work in
    dual-channel. They even published the make and model of the board on
    which they were tested. They used popular motherboards that were in
    common use. Their current policy as stated on their Web site: "TWINX
    modules are tested in pairs, in dual channel motherboards, at very
    aggressive latency settings for optimum performance and
    compatibility." So, as you say, there's nothing "magic", but, in
    fact, some of the better dual-channel pairs are not simply picked
    randomly from a barrel of DIMMs with similar chips.
    >
    >The hardware doesn't care about a number of design issues
    >with DIMMs. But, if you mix different brands of modules,
    >it is hard to say whether the Asus BIOS will always do the
    >right thing (like say one of the DIMMs is missing some
    >critical data from the SPD chip - the BIOS could be very
    >confused). If you want to take chances by buying different
    >modules, make sure the vendor has a good returns policy on
    >RAM, so you can arrange a swap if necessary.
    >
    >Now, if you really go crazy, and buy a 16 chip DIMM and an
    >8 chip DIMM (single sided), both 512MB, that is just asking
    >for trouble. In that case, that does represent a hardware
    >difference, and the hardware signals needed to address those
    >two DIMMs will require a different pattern. I doubt the
    >Athlon64 would be very happy about a difference like that.
    >At least, that is not a combo I would sink my money into :-)
    >
    >If you wish to investigate this for yourself, sometimes you
    >can find a datasheet that explains the matching requirements.
    >This is a good place to start for Athlon64 - see section 4.1.4
    >on page 178 "DIMM Matching Algorithm":
    >
    >http://www.amd.com/us-en/assets/content_type/white_papers_and_tech_docs/26094.PDF
    >
    > Paul

    Ron
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <5nc8d1pp39v1sck26n23r4v7rm1mdbkofu@4ax.com>,
    miller.90@spamlessosu.edu wrote:

    >
    > When Corsair came out with their TwinX modules, they did, in fact test
    > them together to make sure they were matched and would work in
    > dual-channel. They even published the make and model of the board on
    > which they were tested. They used popular motherboards that were in
    > common use. Their current policy as stated on their Web site: "TWINX
    > modules are tested in pairs, in dual channel motherboards, at very
    > aggressive latency settings for optimum performance and
    > compatibility." So, as you say, there's nothing "magic", but, in
    > fact, some of the better dual-channel pairs are not simply picked
    > randomly from a barrel of DIMMs with similar chips.
    >
    > Ron

    You know, when I read the info they place on some of these
    web sites, I wonder about the people running those operations.

    The majority of memory testing should be done at the individual
    chip level. Imagine with a DIMM, that has 16 chips on it,
    what the odds would be of a single bad memory chip making
    the whole module bad. The only way to get a decent yield on
    the DIMMs, is to test the memory chips first, sort them
    for speed, and then assemble the module. Very little test
    time should be spent after final assembly, because at that
    point, the most likely damage, if any, will be I/O pads on
    chips. A cursory test (a few seconds in a hand held memory
    tester) should be enough to determine that the whole module
    works - since all the memory bits were tested at the chip
    level, that kind of testing doesn't have to be repeated.

    One thing you will notice about the vast majority of retail
    products offered for sale, is attention to cosmetic details.
    Workers wear gloves, so that they won't leave finger prints
    all over the place etc. Now, to take a brand new DIMM, and
    scratch up the gold contacts by shoving the DIMM into a
    motherboard, is anathema to that kind of care and attention.

    If you are going to test a DIMM, you would want a ZIF socket
    of some sort. A DIMM socket that doesn't apply force until
    the DIMM is seated.

    So, for me, I don't buy that story about using motherboards
    for test. Another issue - a DIMM socket on a motherboard
    would wear out after about 500 cycles or less - there must
    be a steady stream of motherboards going to the repair station,
    to have the DIMM sockets replaced.

    I'm just a bit sceptical of the whole notion. It sounds like
    the kind of operation I would run out of the basement of
    my house.

    I bet Micron (Crucial) or Samsung don't use motherboards
    for this.

    Paul
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
    news:nospam-1207051145270001@192.168.1.178...
    > In article <42d3a9e4$1@dnews.tpgi.com.au>, "Dragoncarer"
    > <notrightnow@oops.haha> wrote:
    >
    >> "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
    >> news:nospam-1107051731170001@192.168.1.178...
    >> > In article <80g5d1pf2b8prve14h9p9hcejrpg2qphg2@4ax.com>, ChowBoy
    >> > <BadBoyz@chowder.net> wrote:
    >> >
    <polite snip>

    >> Ok, so now I have a super noob question! For dual channel, do you need to
    >> buy specialty 'dual-channel' RAM? Or will any DDR400 RAM work (I'm
    >> thinking
    >> 2 sticks of 512MB normal Kingston DDR 400 here)? By your mention of
    >> 'matched
    >> pair', I assume the two sticks must be the same model from the same
    >> manufacturer. Is this true?
    >>
    >> Many, many thanks.
    >> -DC
    >>
    >
    > If you shop around, there is no excuse for a price premium for
    > "dual channel" packaged parts. If you pay $80 for one module,
    > the dual channel packaged parts should be $160. All they are
    > doing, is taking two modules from the same production batch,
    > and putting them in a package. There is no "magic" testing
    > to establish a match - what you are getting, is two modules
    > that use exactly the same brand of chips. And the contents of
    > the SPD chips on the modules should match as well. They
    > are physically identical, without being "tuned" in any special
    > way. (A guy reaches into a barrel, picks two modules at random,
    > and slaps them into a package.)
    >

    Yep....at my parts store they list their dual channel RAM as "1GB (2x5412MB)
    Brand name yadda yadda" and the price is the same as buying two individual
    sticks.

    <Snip>

    Oh wow, thanks so much! You are a font of knowledge!

    And now another couple of questions:

    I have an existing stick of 512MB DDR400, and my current Mobo is an old
    Gigabyte model. I plan on upgrading soon and will get an ASUS
    A8N-SLI....will that existing stick of 512 work alongside a pair of 512 in
    dual channel mode? Ie., I'll pop the (new) dual-channel sticks in the right
    slots to enable dual-channel config, and the remaining (old) stick in a free
    slot.

    Second question: if I buy the two sticks of RAM now to use as dual channel
    in my new Mobo when I get it, can I use those sticks in my current Mobo
    (obviously they won't run in dual channel)? I'm fairly certain you've
    answered this question in your previous posts: the dual-channel sticks
    aren't anything special or different from normal DDR400, they're just a pair
    from the 'same barrell', as you put it.

    Once again, many, many thanks.

    > http://www.amd.com/us-en/assets/content_type/white_papers_and_tech_docs/26094.PDF

    Ok, so I'm a (little) bit of a tech head, but this is far too tech for me,
    but thanks for the thought! ;)

    >
    > Paul
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <42d49336$1@dnews.tpgi.com.au>, "Dragoncarer"
    <notrightnow@oops.haha> wrote:

    >
    > Yep....at my parts store they list their dual channel RAM as "1GB (2x5412MB)
    > Brand name yadda yadda" and the price is the same as buying two individual
    > sticks.
    >
    > <Snip>
    >
    > Oh wow, thanks so much! You are a font of knowledge!
    >
    > And now another couple of questions:
    >
    > I have an existing stick of 512MB DDR400, and my current Mobo is an old
    > Gigabyte model. I plan on upgrading soon and will get an ASUS
    > A8N-SLI....will that existing stick of 512 work alongside a pair of 512 in
    > dual channel mode? Ie., I'll pop the (new) dual-channel sticks in the right
    > slots to enable dual-channel config, and the remaining (old) stick in a free
    > slot.
    >
    > Second question: if I buy the two sticks of RAM now to use as dual channel
    > in my new Mobo when I get it, can I use those sticks in my current Mobo
    > (obviously they won't run in dual channel)? I'm fairly certain you've
    > answered this question in your previous posts: the dual-channel sticks
    > aren't anything special or different from normal DDR400, they're just a pair
    > from the 'same barrell', as you put it.
    >
    > Once again, many, many thanks.
    >
    > >
    http://www.amd.com/us-en/assets/content_type/white_papers_and_tech_docs/26094.PDF
    >
    > Ok, so I'm a (little) bit of a tech head, but this is far too tech for me,
    > but thanks for the thought! ;)
    >
    > >
    > > Paul

    The Athlon64 memory controller works with 1, 2, or 4 sticks of RAM.
    One stick in B1 or B2 in single channel (B bus is the primary bus).
    Two sticks in B1 and B2 as single channel.
    Two matched sticks in A1&B1 as dual channel
    Two matched sticks in A2&B2 as dual channel
    Four sticks, using the last two combinations together.

    (On Rev.E, I've just read a claim that A1 and A2 can be used in
    single channel, but I'll wait until someone confirms that it
    actually works, as the BIOS might not support it. Up until now,
    Athlon64 wasn't fully symmetric in terms of its usage pattern, so
    A1 and A2 couldn't be used in a 64 bit mode.)

    Athlon64 is not true dual channel - it operates in 64 bit mode
    or 128 bit mode (sort of like a "double wide" single channel).
    Once you make the decision to go dual channel, via using A1&B1 or
    A2&B2, a third "lonely stick" cannot reside in a third slot -
    the BIOS should ignore the third stick. Up to this date, the
    Athlon64 does not have the flexibility of an Nforce2 chipset,
    where virtually anything is possible.

    If you had mentioned your Gigabyte model number, I might have
    been able to comment on what options might work there. If it
    is a single channel three slot board, some typical configs:

    three double sided sticks at DDR266
    two double sided sticks at DDR333 (using slot 1 and slot 3)
    one double sided stick at DDR400 (slot 3, furthest from CPU)

    On boards that have more than one address bus, more is possible.
    A S754 board has two address busses, and on those, two double
    sided sticks work at DDR400 command rate 2T, using slots 1 and
    3. An Nforce2 board, which has three address busses, can run
    three double sided sticks at DDR400 (CAS2 memory recommended
    for best results).

    On the Intel chipset side of things, Intel skirted the issue,
    by limiting the drive signals available to support only two double
    sided DIMMs in some of the last single channel boards. Thus, those
    boards were limited to two double sided sticks at DDR333 as well -
    the slots you are allowed to use may differ in that case.

    Intel dual channel boards can run four sticks at DDR400, as they
    are really two, two stick channels. Similar to Athlon64, but
    for some reason, without ever exposing the command rate setting
    as an issue (there is no chipset register for command rate, and
    Xbitlabs claims it always runs command rate 2T).

    HTH,
    Paul
  14. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
    news:nospam-1307050226150001@192.168.1.178...
    > In article <42d49336$1@dnews.tpgi.com.au>, "Dragoncarer"
    > <notrightnow@oops.haha> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Yep....at my parts store they list their dual channel RAM as "1GB
    >> (2x5412MB)
    >> Brand name yadda yadda" and the price is the same as buying two
    >> individual
    >> sticks.
    >>
    >> <Snip>
    >>
    >> Oh wow, thanks so much! You are a font of knowledge!
    >>
    >> And now another couple of questions:
    >>
    >> I have an existing stick of 512MB DDR400, and my current Mobo is an old
    >> Gigabyte model. I plan on upgrading soon and will get an ASUS
    >> A8N-SLI....will that existing stick of 512 work alongside a pair of 512
    >> in
    >> dual channel mode? Ie., I'll pop the (new) dual-channel sticks in the
    >> right
    >> slots to enable dual-channel config, and the remaining (old) stick in a
    >> free
    >> slot.
    >>
    >> Second question: if I buy the two sticks of RAM now to use as dual
    >> channel
    >> in my new Mobo when I get it, can I use those sticks in my current Mobo
    >> (obviously they won't run in dual channel)? I'm fairly certain you've
    >> answered this question in your previous posts: the dual-channel sticks
    >> aren't anything special or different from normal DDR400, they're just a
    >> pair
    >> from the 'same barrell', as you put it.
    >>
    >> Once again, many, many thanks.
    >>
    >> >
    > http://www.amd.com/us-en/assets/content_type/white_papers_and_tech_docs/26094.PDF
    >>
    >> Ok, so I'm a (little) bit of a tech head, but this is far too tech for
    >> me,
    >> but thanks for the thought! ;)
    >>
    >> >
    >> > Paul
    >
    > The Athlon64 memory controller works with 1, 2, or 4 sticks of RAM.
    > One stick in B1 or B2 in single channel (B bus is the primary bus).
    > Two sticks in B1 and B2 as single channel.
    > Two matched sticks in A1&B1 as dual channel
    > Two matched sticks in A2&B2 as dual channel
    > Four sticks, using the last two combinations together.
    >
    > (On Rev.E, I've just read a claim that A1 and A2 can be used in
    > single channel, but I'll wait until someone confirms that it
    > actually works, as the BIOS might not support it. Up until now,
    > Athlon64 wasn't fully symmetric in terms of its usage pattern, so
    > A1 and A2 couldn't be used in a 64 bit mode.)
    >
    > Athlon64 is not true dual channel - it operates in 64 bit mode
    > or 128 bit mode (sort of like a "double wide" single channel).
    > Once you make the decision to go dual channel, via using A1&B1 or
    > A2&B2, a third "lonely stick" cannot reside in a third slot -
    > the BIOS should ignore the third stick. Up to this date, the
    > Athlon64 does not have the flexibility of an Nforce2 chipset,
    > where virtually anything is possible.
    >
    > If you had mentioned your Gigabyte model number, I might have
    > been able to comment on what options might work there. If it
    > is a single channel three slot board, some typical configs:
    >
    > three double sided sticks at DDR266
    > two double sided sticks at DDR333 (using slot 1 and slot 3)
    > one double sided stick at DDR400 (slot 3, furthest from CPU)
    >
    > On boards that have more than one address bus, more is possible.
    > A S754 board has two address busses, and on those, two double
    > sided sticks work at DDR400 command rate 2T, using slots 1 and
    > 3. An Nforce2 board, which has three address busses, can run
    > three double sided sticks at DDR400 (CAS2 memory recommended
    > for best results).
    >
    > On the Intel chipset side of things, Intel skirted the issue,
    > by limiting the drive signals available to support only two double
    > sided DIMMs in some of the last single channel boards. Thus, those
    > boards were limited to two double sided sticks at DDR333 as well -
    > the slots you are allowed to use may differ in that case.
    >
    > Intel dual channel boards can run four sticks at DDR400, as they
    > are really two, two stick channels. Similar to Athlon64, but
    > for some reason, without ever exposing the command rate setting
    > as an issue (there is no chipset register for command rate, and
    > Xbitlabs claims it always runs command rate 2T).
    >
    > HTH,
    > Paul

    Yeah it did, kinda....the point is my 'lonely' stick will be useless in the
    new motherboard if I have two other sticks running in 'faux dual channel'.
    Oh well....looks like my brother will be getting a present.

    My existing motherboard is 7S748. I'm not worried about dual channel, just
    whether the new RAM would work in it. But I'm fairly sure they will.

    Thanks again.
  15. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <42d5d9ab@dnews.tpgi.com.au>, "Dragoncarer"
    <notrightnow@oops.haha> wrote:

    >
    > Yeah it did, kinda....the point is my 'lonely' stick will be useless in the
    > new motherboard if I have two other sticks running in 'faux dual channel'.
    > Oh well....looks like my brother will be getting a present.
    >
    > My existing motherboard is 7S748. I'm not worried about dual channel, just
    > whether the new RAM would work in it. But I'm fairly sure they will.
    >
    > Thanks again.

    The closest manual for the SIS748 chipset I can find, is the
    Asrock K7S8XE series. The manual basically has this kind of
    info:

    three double sided sticks at DDR266
    two double sided sticks at DDR333 (using slot 1 and slot 3)
    one double sided stick at DDR400 (slot 3, furthest from CPU)

    In other words, the faster the memory clock is set, the fewer
    sticks that will work error free. You can install three sticks,
    but be prepared to turn down the memory clock. Test with
    memtest86+ from memtest.org before booting into Windows with
    the new memory configuration. If you can do a couple of complete
    passes error free, then let it boot into Windows.

    HTH,
    Paul
  16. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
    news:nospam-1407050029550001@192.168.1.178...
    > In article <42d5d9ab@dnews.tpgi.com.au>, "Dragoncarer"
    > <notrightnow@oops.haha> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Yeah it did, kinda....the point is my 'lonely' stick will be useless in
    >> the
    >> new motherboard if I have two other sticks running in 'faux dual
    >> channel'.
    >> Oh well....looks like my brother will be getting a present.
    >>
    >> My existing motherboard is 7S748. I'm not worried about dual channel,
    >> just
    >> whether the new RAM would work in it. But I'm fairly sure they will.
    >>
    >> Thanks again.
    >
    > The closest manual for the SIS748 chipset I can find, is the
    > Asrock K7S8XE series. The manual basically has this kind of
    > info:
    >
    > three double sided sticks at DDR266
    > two double sided sticks at DDR333 (using slot 1 and slot 3)
    > one double sided stick at DDR400 (slot 3, furthest from CPU)
    >
    > In other words, the faster the memory clock is set, the fewer
    > sticks that will work error free. You can install three sticks,
    > but be prepared to turn down the memory clock. Test with
    > memtest86+ from memtest.org before booting into Windows with
    > the new memory configuration. If you can do a couple of complete
    > passes error free, then let it boot into Windows.
    >
    > HTH,
    > Paul

    OK, thanks.
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