BAD Problems with Asus Mobos

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

In the past 3 months I have seen 5 Asus mobos die. In the 10 years before
then I have only seen ONE fail. All of the boards were either the P4P800-SE
(3), the P4P800 Deluxe (2), or the newer P5GD2 Deluxe (1) mobos. All,
except one, are used for AutoCAD workstations and use ATI 9600 or 9800 video
cards. At first I thought that the problem must have been a bad power
supply, then a bad video card, then a bad hard drive...then memory. Now, I
realize that these boards have serious problems. First, I've noticed a
couple of things about all of the boards that did not apply to all of the
other Asus boards that I've purchase/installed over the years (about 100 or
so).

1) The newer boards all use the "AI" bios and ALL of them seem to run very
hot
2) The newer boards are no longer made in Taiwan, but in China

Now, one thing that needs to be mentioned is that these boards have failed
when being used heavily. That is, they are processing huge data files in
AutoCAD and/or gaming. My gut tells me that perhaps the switching voltage
regulators are failing, or something else is overheating and failing. I'm
certain that it is an overheating type of issue due to the way the boards
are dying. They all usually lock up after being run for a while...then they
simply refuse to boot when the power button is pushed.

I have RMA'd boards until I'm sick and now have decided to go with Intel
boards due to their build quality since these are mission-critical machines.

My question is this: Have any of you noticed a similar pattern with Asus
boards? I have the P4C800 Deluxe as my personal machine and while it works,
it does lock from time to time or refuses to boot leaving me with a blank
screen. Keep in mind that these are 4 different computers that I've
referred to, and all use high-quality Sparkle or Antec power supplies and
high-end memory as well as other good components. The ONLY similarity in all
of them is that they are using ASUS mainboards.

One machine (the P5GD2) I replaced with an Intel board and it immediately
ran MUCH cooler and haven't had a problem since and that's been 6 months
ago.

I'm certain that there is a real quality problem with Asus boards now and
would like to know if any of you, or how many of you may have experienced
similar problems. I will never use another Asus board again, and I've been
using them and recommending them for the past 11 years.

Thanks for listening....

-Steve
16 answers Last reply
More about problems asus mobos
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    its just you buddy.


    you got a serious problem in your setup somewhere. like maybe your house
    electrical wiring is messed up


    "Steve" <spfouche@inetnow.net> wrote in message
    news:J92dnZrBZqOKsEHfRVn-rw@comcast.com...
    > In the past 3 months I have seen 5 Asus mobos die. In the 10 years before
    > then I have only seen ONE fail. All of the boards were either the
    > P4P800-SE
    > (3), the P4P800 Deluxe (2), or the newer P5GD2 Deluxe (1) mobos. All,
    > except one, are used for AutoCAD workstations and use ATI 9600 or 9800
    > video
    > cards. At first I thought that the problem must have been a bad power
    > supply, then a bad video card, then a bad hard drive...then memory. Now,
    > I
    > realize that these boards have serious problems. First, I've noticed a
    > couple of things about all of the boards that did not apply to all of the
    > other Asus boards that I've purchase/installed over the years (about 100
    > or
    > so).
    >
    > 1) The newer boards all use the "AI" bios and ALL of them seem to run
    > very
    > hot
    > 2) The newer boards are no longer made in Taiwan, but in China
    >
    > Now, one thing that needs to be mentioned is that these boards have failed
    > when being used heavily. That is, they are processing huge data files in
    > AutoCAD and/or gaming. My gut tells me that perhaps the switching voltage
    > regulators are failing, or something else is overheating and failing. I'm
    > certain that it is an overheating type of issue due to the way the boards
    > are dying. They all usually lock up after being run for a while...then
    > they
    > simply refuse to boot when the power button is pushed.
    >
    > I have RMA'd boards until I'm sick and now have decided to go with Intel
    > boards due to their build quality since these are mission-critical
    > machines.
    >
    > My question is this: Have any of you noticed a similar pattern with Asus
    > boards? I have the P4C800 Deluxe as my personal machine and while it
    > works,
    > it does lock from time to time or refuses to boot leaving me with a blank
    > screen. Keep in mind that these are 4 different computers that I've
    > referred to, and all use high-quality Sparkle or Antec power supplies and
    > high-end memory as well as other good components. The ONLY similarity in
    > all
    > of them is that they are using ASUS mainboards.
    >
    > One machine (the P5GD2) I replaced with an Intel board and it immediately
    > ran MUCH cooler and haven't had a problem since and that's been 6 months
    > ago.
    >
    > I'm certain that there is a real quality problem with Asus boards now and
    > would like to know if any of you, or how many of you may have experienced
    > similar problems. I will never use another Asus board again, and I've
    > been
    > using them and recommending them for the past 11 years.
    >
    > Thanks for listening....
    >
    > -Steve
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Yes, I had a P4C800E Deluxe die recently. Asus RMA'ed a rebuilt replacement
    but I have not used it. I needed my system back up fast and had immediate
    access to an Intel 865PERL which is what I'm using now with all the old
    parts. Can't bring myself to put the P4 back in.
    Very shortly afterward I had my ASUS Radeon 9800 Pro video card fail (fans).
    I just received word this morning that it has been shipped from RMA. But the
    replacement ATI 9200 has been working just fine for the last 6 weeks.
    A $500 lesson. Wanna buy some slightly used Asus parts?
    I suspect that it has more to do with the "10 pounds of potatoes in a 5
    pound bag" syndrome. These boards have got every feature you can have at the
    moment. When they work they are the balls. But the more "moving" parts in
    any machine....
    Now throw in cheap parts.

    "Steve" <spfouche@inetnow.net> wrote in message
    news:J92dnZrBZqOKsEHfRVn-rw@comcast.com...
    > In the past 3 months I have seen 5 Asus mobos die. In the 10 years before
    > then I have only seen ONE fail. All of the boards were either the
    > P4P800-SE
    > (3), the P4P800 Deluxe (2), or the newer P5GD2 Deluxe (1) mobos. All,
    > except one, are used for AutoCAD workstations and use ATI 9600 or 9800
    > video
    > cards. At first I thought that the problem must have been a bad power
    > supply, then a bad video card, then a bad hard drive...then memory. Now,
    > I
    > realize that these boards have serious problems. First, I've noticed a
    > couple of things about all of the boards that did not apply to all of the
    > other Asus boards that I've purchase/installed over the years (about 100
    > or
    > so).
    >
    > 1) The newer boards all use the "AI" bios and ALL of them seem to run
    > very
    > hot
    > 2) The newer boards are no longer made in Taiwan, but in China
    >
    > Now, one thing that needs to be mentioned is that these boards have failed
    > when being used heavily. That is, they are processing huge data files in
    > AutoCAD and/or gaming. My gut tells me that perhaps the switching voltage
    > regulators are failing, or something else is overheating and failing. I'm
    > certain that it is an overheating type of issue due to the way the boards
    > are dying. They all usually lock up after being run for a while...then
    > they
    > simply refuse to boot when the power button is pushed.
    >
    > I have RMA'd boards until I'm sick and now have decided to go with Intel
    > boards due to their build quality since these are mission-critical
    > machines.
    >
    > My question is this: Have any of you noticed a similar pattern with Asus
    > boards? I have the P4C800 Deluxe as my personal machine and while it
    > works,
    > it does lock from time to time or refuses to boot leaving me with a blank
    > screen. Keep in mind that these are 4 different computers that I've
    > referred to, and all use high-quality Sparkle or Antec power supplies and
    > high-end memory as well as other good components. The ONLY similarity in
    > all
    > of them is that they are using ASUS mainboards.
    >
    > One machine (the P5GD2) I replaced with an Intel board and it immediately
    > ran MUCH cooler and haven't had a problem since and that's been 6 months
    > ago.
    >
    > I'm certain that there is a real quality problem with Asus boards now and
    > would like to know if any of you, or how many of you may have experienced
    > similar problems. I will never use another Asus board again, and I've
    > been
    > using them and recommending them for the past 11 years.
    >
    > Thanks for listening....
    >
    > -Steve
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Like to believe this Richard, but this is in a business where there are 20
    other computers running...without a problem. In addition, every computer
    has it's own APC UPS for protection. Btw, the other 20 are using Asus
    boards that are made in Taiwan.

    -Steve


    "Richard Gnutered" <rugnuts49@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
    news:kxWCe.1645$Qi4.261268@news20.bellglobal.com...
    its just you buddy.


    you got a serious problem in your setup somewhere. like maybe your house
    electrical wiring is messed up
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Steve wrote:

    > My question is this: Have any of you noticed a similar pattern with
    > Asus boards? I have the P4C800 Deluxe as my personal machine and
    > while it works, it does lock from time to time or refuses to boot
    > leaving me with a blank screen. Keep in mind that these are 4
    > different computers that I've referred to, and all use high-quality
    > Sparkle or Antec power supplies and high-end memory as well as other
    > good components. The ONLY similarity in all of them is that they are
    > using ASUS mainboards.

    Hi Steve!

    No, I have no experience with P4 Boards. But your troubles might been a
    capacitor fault. I have resoldered some capacitors on AMD Athlon Boards
    (KT133A). Usually the capcitors (4700uF) near the AGP are drying out
    very quickly, bez its very hot there and the cap itself heats, too.
    Biggest problem is, when the capacitor is totally finished, it may make
    a short circuit and damage the MB.
    On the other Hand, when the cap cannot collect the specified power
    anymore the MB hangs. Caps have a short live compared to other
    electronic elements, also high quality caps (2-10 Years). Cheap or bad
    one can break after some month of heavy use.

    Certainly cheap caps!

    > One machine (the P5GD2) I replaced with an Intel board and it
    > immediately ran MUCH cooler and haven't had a problem since and
    > that's been 6 months ago.
    >
    > I'm certain that there is a real quality problem with Asus boards now
    > and would like to know if any of you, or how many of you may have
    > experienced similar problems. I will never use another Asus board
    > again, and I've been using them and recommending them for the past 11
    > years.
    >
    > Thanks for listening....
    >
    > -Steve

    Please!


    Best Regards,

    Daniel Mandic
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <J92dnZrBZqOKsEHfRVn-rw@comcast.com>, "Steve"
    <spfouche@inetnow.net> wrote:

    > In the past 3 months I have seen 5 Asus mobos die. In the 10 years before
    > then I have only seen ONE fail. All of the boards were either the P4P800-SE
    > (3), the P4P800 Deluxe (2), or the newer P5GD2 Deluxe (1) mobos. All,
    > except one, are used for AutoCAD workstations and use ATI 9600 or 9800 video
    > cards. At first I thought that the problem must have been a bad power
    > supply, then a bad video card, then a bad hard drive...then memory. Now, I
    > realize that these boards have serious problems. First, I've noticed a
    > couple of things about all of the boards that did not apply to all of the
    > other Asus boards that I've purchase/installed over the years (about 100 or
    > so).
    >
    > 1) The newer boards all use the "AI" bios and ALL of them seem to run very
    > hot
    > 2) The newer boards are no longer made in Taiwan, but in China
    >
    > Now, one thing that needs to be mentioned is that these boards have failed
    > when being used heavily. That is, they are processing huge data files in
    > AutoCAD and/or gaming. My gut tells me that perhaps the switching voltage
    > regulators are failing, or something else is overheating and failing. I'm
    > certain that it is an overheating type of issue due to the way the boards
    > are dying. They all usually lock up after being run for a while...then they
    > simply refuse to boot when the power button is pushed.
    >
    > I have RMA'd boards until I'm sick and now have decided to go with Intel
    > boards due to their build quality since these are mission-critical machines.
    >
    > My question is this: Have any of you noticed a similar pattern with Asus
    > boards? I have the P4C800 Deluxe as my personal machine and while it works,
    > it does lock from time to time or refuses to boot leaving me with a blank
    > screen. Keep in mind that these are 4 different computers that I've
    > referred to, and all use high-quality Sparkle or Antec power supplies and
    > high-end memory as well as other good components. The ONLY similarity in all
    > of them is that they are using ASUS mainboards.
    >
    > One machine (the P5GD2) I replaced with an Intel board and it immediately
    > ran MUCH cooler and haven't had a problem since and that's been 6 months
    > ago.
    >
    > I'm certain that there is a real quality problem with Asus boards now and
    > would like to know if any of you, or how many of you may have experienced
    > similar problems. I will never use another Asus board again, and I've been
    > using them and recommending them for the past 11 years.
    >
    > Thanks for listening....
    >
    > -Steve

    Finding trends in motherboard failures, as end users, is a
    difficult process. I only know of one serious problem that
    a fair number of user have experienced.

    There is a known problem with Asus P4P/P4C boards caused by the
    ICH5 Southbridge and the USB ports. It seems like a little ESD into
    a USB port, causes the Southbridge to go into latchup. Latchup is
    a condition, where a phantom PNPN junction forms from rail to rail
    inside the chip. The end result is meltdown (excessive current flow
    makes the chip burning hot). Here is an article and a picture of a
    typical victim. See if the ICH5(R) on your P4P boards
    are the parts that failed, and compare the appearance of your
    Southbridge to the picture in the second link. (Taking high res
    photos of the motherboard you are RMAing, might allow to you to
    check later for issues that can be identified visually.)

    http://tw.giga-byte.com/Motherboard/Support/FAQ/FAQ_456.htm
    http://www.abxzone.com/forums/showthread.php?t=84122&highlight=usb+port

    This problem is not restricted to Asus boards. And in one reported
    case, the failure happened on a reboot. As there are no explanations
    on the web, I'm going to have to assume this is an Intel chip
    problem. The giga-byte warning page is the only public admission of
    a problem that I've seen (and thank goodness someone posted the link).

    I'd be more interested in what failed on the P5GD2, as there have
    been no reports of failures on ICH6(R). And the funny thing about
    the ICH5(R) problems, is that they happened quite a while after the
    introduction of the board, implying the problem just might be
    related in some way to "power on hours".

    Regarding the Intel board thing, Intel doesn't actually make the
    boards themselves. They contract out the motherboard manufacturing,
    and at one point, you guessed it, Asus was making the boards :-)
    I'm not sure that is still true of this date - it could be the latest
    contract was let with someone else. (And the design authority, the
    schematic capture, could be done in Folsom, rather than by Asus.)

    As for the China bashing, do you really have a choice these days ?
    I'm sure any production manager who wasn't manufacturing in China,
    would be fired on the spot. It is all about the nickels and dimes,
    after all.

    High thermal, as such, does not guarantee a premature death for
    hardware. Consider the lowly laptop, for example, which has to
    endure very poor airflow, and restricted access to the outside
    world. They seem to work OK.

    High heat is bad for electrolytic capacitors. If your power
    supply does not have a high enough fan speed to keep its innards
    cooled, that will mean an early failure of the power supply. If
    you look at the recommended temperature/humidity curves for disk
    drives, you would realize the only real reason for cooling a
    computer, is for the disk drives. The silicon on the motherboard
    can take a lot more temperature rise than the disks can.

    For the machines that haven't yet failed. start an Autocad job,
    take the side off the computer, use an antistatic strap on one
    arm, then probe the board with your fingers, looking for hot
    components. In other words, do some more detective work, to see
    if there is anything abnormal about your gear. A P4 system should
    really have at least one fan in the front (pulling air in), and
    one fan (separate from the PSU fan) on the rear of the computer.
    If the only fan on your computers, is the PSU fan, then yes,
    you are torturing your machines.

    A 7 to 10C temperature rise inside the case, is a reasonable level
    of heating for a computer case. If the outside air is 25C, then
    the case air can rise to 32C to 35C. On one computer I have here
    (the one with the P4 in it), I had to remove some plastic grillwork
    on my computer case, to get enough air flow through the case. To
    check the temperatures, you can use Asus Probe to make some
    measurements. The side should be on the case, as if the fans are
    working properly, the best cooling should be with the side of the
    case put in place.

    HTH,
    Paul
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "Richard Gnutered" <rugnuts49@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
    news:kxWCe.1645$Qi4.261268@news20.bellglobal.com...
    > its just you buddy.
    >
    >
    > you got a serious problem in your setup somewhere. like maybe your house
    > electrical wiring is messed up
    >
    >
    > "Steve" <spfouche@inetnow.net> wrote in message
    > news:J92dnZrBZqOKsEHfRVn-rw@comcast.com...
    > > In the past 3 months I have seen 5 Asus mobos die. In the 10 years
    before
    > > then I have only seen ONE fail. All of the boards were either the
    > > P4P800-SE
    > > (3), the P4P800 Deluxe (2), or the newer P5GD2 Deluxe (1) mobos. All,
    > > except one, are used for AutoCAD workstations and use ATI 9600 or 9800
    > > video
    > > cards. At first I thought that the problem must have been a bad power
    > > supply, then a bad video card, then a bad hard drive...then memory.
    Now,
    > >
    > > >snipped
    > > -Steve
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
    Interestingly my P4p800S-E did a similiar failure 3 weeks ago. Was
    transferring large files over network to this Pc and it locked up solid .
    Only way to get back was a restart and then it locked up in the reboot.

    Finally found out that resetting bios allowed windows boot to complete but
    it was still very unstable. Replacing battery no help I felt that the bios
    chip got corrupted as even a bios flash made no change. even locked up
    within the bios .

    I replaced the board and all fine now.

    the board was not under warranty as was a freebee from asus.(long story).
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    "Steve" <spfouche@inetnow.net> wrote in message
    news:J92dnZrBZqOKsEHfRVn-rw@comcast.com...
    > In the past 3 months I have seen 5 Asus mobos die. In the 10 years before
    > then I have only seen ONE fail. All of the boards were either the
    > P4P800-SE
    > (3), the P4P800 Deluxe (2), or the newer P5GD2 Deluxe (1) mobos. All,
    > except one, are used for AutoCAD workstations and use ATI 9600 or 9800
    > video
    > cards. At first I thought that the problem must have been a bad power
    > supply, then a bad video card, then a bad hard drive...then memory. Now,
    > I
    > realize that these boards have serious problems. First, I've noticed a
    > couple of things about all of the boards that did not apply to all of the
    > other Asus boards that I've purchase/installed over the years (about 100
    > or
    > so).
    >
    > 1) The newer boards all use the "AI" bios and ALL of them seem to run
    > very
    > hot
    > 2) The newer boards are no longer made in Taiwan, but in China
    >
    > Now, one thing that needs to be mentioned is that these boards have failed
    > when being used heavily. That is, they are processing huge data files in
    > AutoCAD and/or gaming. My gut tells me that perhaps the switching voltage
    > regulators are failing, or something else is overheating and failing. I'm
    > certain that it is an overheating type of issue due to the way the boards
    > are dying. They all usually lock up after being run for a while...then
    > they
    > simply refuse to boot when the power button is pushed.
    >
    > I have RMA'd boards until I'm sick and now have decided to go with Intel
    > boards due to their build quality since these are mission-critical
    > machines.
    >
    > My question is this: Have any of you noticed a similar pattern with Asus
    > boards? I have the P4C800 Deluxe as my personal machine and while it
    > works,
    > it does lock from time to time or refuses to boot leaving me with a blank
    > screen. Keep in mind that these are 4 different computers that I've
    > referred to, and all use high-quality Sparkle or Antec power supplies and
    > high-end memory as well as other good components. The ONLY similarity in
    > all
    > of them is that they are using ASUS mainboards.
    >
    > One machine (the P5GD2) I replaced with an Intel board and it immediately
    > ran MUCH cooler and haven't had a problem since and that's been 6 months
    > ago.
    >
    > I'm certain that there is a real quality problem with Asus boards now and
    > would like to know if any of you, or how many of you may have experienced
    > similar problems. I will never use another Asus board again, and I've
    > been
    > using them and recommending them for the past 11 years.
    >
    > Thanks for listening....
    >
    > -Steve
    >
    >

    A motherboard cannot run "hot". You were running P4 procs on those boards,
    and the procs supported by those boards run at temps just below the temp at
    the surface of the sun. I would surmise that your problems were related
    directly to inadequate cooling. the ASUS boards you cited are very stable,
    rock solid boards when implemented in a well cooled environment.

    Bobby
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Bobby, I thought at one point that the problem HAD to be the processor so I
    RMA'd the cpu back to Intel and they sent me a brand new one. Four weeks
    later the board blew up again. I've changed EVERY component in that one
    system at least once. Airflow is exceptional with 3 exhaust fans (2 in the
    PS), and one intake fan. The northbridge HS runs very very warm, much
    warmer than on the Intel board. That's a clue to me. I'm pretty certain
    that it's either the AI bios is doing something to the hardware in these
    boards, but I'm not an engineer so I can't say for sure. I just know that
    these problems started occuring when I noticed the "AI" "features" on the
    box/bios, and when I noticed the "made in China" stickers on them.

    Remember, I said that the systems that failed were used heavily. Huge tiff
    files were manipulated in AutoCAD so these systems were pushed to their
    limits before they failed. If you don't push your system really hard every
    day, then I don't expect as many failures to occur. I think that Asus just
    hasn't pushed their system's QA hard enough and these boards may/will fail
    prematurely if used in a tough computing environment. As I stated before,
    the other 20 machines are running Asus boards that were made in Taiwan and
    built about 1 to 2 years ago and none have failed.

    Btw, the A/C in the bldg is cold enough that the many of the employees have
    to wear sweaters. These boards are flawed, and I just wanted to hear of
    similar problems if they exist. I thought it may have been a bad batch of
    boards, but this is impossible due to boards that were RMA'd or purchased
    other places.

    Btw, each of these systems was running 2GB of DDR400 Kingston memory.

    -Steve
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    No, the motherboard gets hot. Away from the processor. I noticed it. The guy
    at the computer shop that switched out the board for me while I was at work
    mentioned it (unsolicited). The board gets hot. Hot enough to burn your
    fingers.

    "NoNoBadDog!" <no_@spam_verizon.net> wrote in message
    news:1eZCe.6133$N91.1635@trnddc08...
    >
    > "Steve" <spfouche@inetnow.net> wrote in message
    > news:J92dnZrBZqOKsEHfRVn-rw@comcast.com...
    >> In the past 3 months I have seen 5 Asus mobos die. In the 10 years
    >> before
    >> then I have only seen ONE fail. All of the boards were either the
    >> P4P800-SE
    >> (3), the P4P800 Deluxe (2), or the newer P5GD2 Deluxe (1) mobos. All,
    >> except one, are used for AutoCAD workstations and use ATI 9600 or 9800
    >> video
    >> cards. At first I thought that the problem must have been a bad power
    >> supply, then a bad video card, then a bad hard drive...then memory. Now,
    >> I
    >> realize that these boards have serious problems. First, I've noticed a
    >> couple of things about all of the boards that did not apply to all of the
    >> other Asus boards that I've purchase/installed over the years (about 100
    >> or
    >> so).
    >>
    >> 1) The newer boards all use the "AI" bios and ALL of them seem to run
    >> very
    >> hot
    >> 2) The newer boards are no longer made in Taiwan, but in China
    >>
    >> Now, one thing that needs to be mentioned is that these boards have
    >> failed
    >> when being used heavily. That is, they are processing huge data files in
    >> AutoCAD and/or gaming. My gut tells me that perhaps the switching
    >> voltage
    >> regulators are failing, or something else is overheating and failing.
    >> I'm
    >> certain that it is an overheating type of issue due to the way the boards
    >> are dying. They all usually lock up after being run for a while...then
    >> they
    >> simply refuse to boot when the power button is pushed.
    >>
    >> I have RMA'd boards until I'm sick and now have decided to go with Intel
    >> boards due to their build quality since these are mission-critical
    >> machines.
    >>
    >> My question is this: Have any of you noticed a similar pattern with Asus
    >> boards? I have the P4C800 Deluxe as my personal machine and while it
    >> works,
    >> it does lock from time to time or refuses to boot leaving me with a blank
    >> screen. Keep in mind that these are 4 different computers that I've
    >> referred to, and all use high-quality Sparkle or Antec power supplies and
    >> high-end memory as well as other good components. The ONLY similarity in
    >> all
    >> of them is that they are using ASUS mainboards.
    >>
    >> One machine (the P5GD2) I replaced with an Intel board and it immediately
    >> ran MUCH cooler and haven't had a problem since and that's been 6 months
    >> ago.
    >>
    >> I'm certain that there is a real quality problem with Asus boards now and
    >> would like to know if any of you, or how many of you may have experienced
    >> similar problems. I will never use another Asus board again, and I've
    >> been
    >> using them and recommending them for the past 11 years.
    >>
    >> Thanks for listening....
    >>
    >> -Steve
    >>
    >>
    >
    > A motherboard cannot run "hot". You were running P4 procs on those
    > boards, and the procs supported by those boards run at temps just below
    > the temp at the surface of the sun. I would surmise that your problems
    > were related directly to inadequate cooling. the ASUS boards you cited
    > are very stable, rock solid boards when implemented in a well cooled
    > environment.
    >
    > Bobby
    >
    >
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Thanks Paul, this was a very informative post. I know that on one occasion
    that the entire USB controller did seem to die, but the mobo worked
    otherwise. I had to RMA the board for the USB controller problem, but the
    board failed a month later completely...again. I wonder if this southbridge
    problem could kill the entire board? From the one picture it appears
    possible, but I've checked the southbridge controllers on every RMA because
    I remember reading where they could get extremely hot on occasion but I
    wasn't sure why. I didn't find any sign of burning or discoloring however.
    The northbridge seems to run hot on these boards as well, but I haven't
    checked the temp on the southbridge. One thing that your post made me
    wonder was that in each of these configurations I was using a RAID 1 setup
    using the ICH5R chip with dual Seagate drives. I wonder if the failures are
    due to the RAID 1 possibly combined with the USB problem?..or due to the
    RAID 1.

    Thanks again for your post, plenty of airflow in these systems so whatever
    is happening isn't normal.

    I wasn't even aware of the USB problem until your post.

    -Steve


    "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
    news:nospam-1807052300410001@192.168.1.178...
    In article <J92dnZrBZqOKsEHfRVn-rw@comcast.com>, "Steve"
    <spfouche@inetnow.net> wrote:

    > In the past 3 months I have seen 5 Asus mobos die. In the 10 years before
    > then I have only seen ONE fail. All of the boards were either the
    P4P800-SE
    > (3), the P4P800 Deluxe (2), or the newer P5GD2 Deluxe (1) mobos. All,
    > except one, are used for AutoCAD workstations and use ATI 9600 or 9800
    video
    > cards. At first I thought that the problem must have been a bad power
    > supply, then a bad video card, then a bad hard drive...then memory. Now,
    I
    > realize that these boards have serious problems. First, I've noticed a
    > couple of things about all of the boards that did not apply to all of the
    > other Asus boards that I've purchase/installed over the years (about 100
    or
    > so).
    >
    > 1) The newer boards all use the "AI" bios and ALL of them seem to run
    very
    > hot
    > 2) The newer boards are no longer made in Taiwan, but in China
    >
    > Now, one thing that needs to be mentioned is that these boards have failed
    > when being used heavily. That is, they are processing huge data files in
    > AutoCAD and/or gaming. My gut tells me that perhaps the switching voltage
    > regulators are failing, or something else is overheating and failing. I'm
    > certain that it is an overheating type of issue due to the way the boards
    > are dying. They all usually lock up after being run for a while...then
    they
    > simply refuse to boot when the power button is pushed.
    >
    > I have RMA'd boards until I'm sick and now have decided to go with Intel
    > boards due to their build quality since these are mission-critical
    machines.
    >
    > My question is this: Have any of you noticed a similar pattern with Asus
    > boards? I have the P4C800 Deluxe as my personal machine and while it
    works,
    > it does lock from time to time or refuses to boot leaving me with a blank
    > screen. Keep in mind that these are 4 different computers that I've
    > referred to, and all use high-quality Sparkle or Antec power supplies and
    > high-end memory as well as other good components. The ONLY similarity in
    all
    > of them is that they are using ASUS mainboards.
    >
    > One machine (the P5GD2) I replaced with an Intel board and it immediately
    > ran MUCH cooler and haven't had a problem since and that's been 6 months
    > ago.
    >
    > I'm certain that there is a real quality problem with Asus boards now and
    > would like to know if any of you, or how many of you may have experienced
    > similar problems. I will never use another Asus board again, and I've
    been
    > using them and recommending them for the past 11 years.
    >
    > Thanks for listening....
    >
    > -Steve

    Finding trends in motherboard failures, as end users, is a
    difficult process. I only know of one serious problem that
    a fair number of user have experienced.

    There is a known problem with Asus P4P/P4C boards caused by the
    ICH5 Southbridge and the USB ports. It seems like a little ESD into
    a USB port, causes the Southbridge to go into latchup. Latchup is
    a condition, where a phantom PNPN junction forms from rail to rail
    inside the chip. The end result is meltdown (excessive current flow
    makes the chip burning hot). Here is an article and a picture of a
    typical victim. See if the ICH5(R) on your P4P boards
    are the parts that failed, and compare the appearance of your
    Southbridge to the picture in the second link. (Taking high res
    photos of the motherboard you are RMAing, might allow to you to
    check later for issues that can be identified visually.)

    http://tw.giga-byte.com/Motherboard/Support/FAQ/FAQ_456.htm
    http://www.abxzone.com/forums/showthread.php?t=84122&highlight=usb+port

    This problem is not restricted to Asus boards. And in one reported
    case, the failure happened on a reboot. As there are no explanations
    on the web, I'm going to have to assume this is an Intel chip
    problem. The giga-byte warning page is the only public admission of
    a problem that I've seen (and thank goodness someone posted the link).

    I'd be more interested in what failed on the P5GD2, as there have
    been no reports of failures on ICH6(R). And the funny thing about
    the ICH5(R) problems, is that they happened quite a while after the
    introduction of the board, implying the problem just might be
    related in some way to "power on hours".

    Regarding the Intel board thing, Intel doesn't actually make the
    boards themselves. They contract out the motherboard manufacturing,
    and at one point, you guessed it, Asus was making the boards :-)
    I'm not sure that is still true of this date - it could be the latest
    contract was let with someone else. (And the design authority, the
    schematic capture, could be done in Folsom, rather than by Asus.)

    As for the China bashing, do you really have a choice these days ?
    I'm sure any production manager who wasn't manufacturing in China,
    would be fired on the spot. It is all about the nickels and dimes,
    after all.

    High thermal, as such, does not guarantee a premature death for
    hardware. Consider the lowly laptop, for example, which has to
    endure very poor airflow, and restricted access to the outside
    world. They seem to work OK.

    High heat is bad for electrolytic capacitors. If your power
    supply does not have a high enough fan speed to keep its innards
    cooled, that will mean an early failure of the power supply. If
    you look at the recommended temperature/humidity curves for disk
    drives, you would realize the only real reason for cooling a
    computer, is for the disk drives. The silicon on the motherboard
    can take a lot more temperature rise than the disks can.

    For the machines that haven't yet failed. start an Autocad job,
    take the side off the computer, use an antistatic strap on one
    arm, then probe the board with your fingers, looking for hot
    components. In other words, do some more detective work, to see
    if there is anything abnormal about your gear. A P4 system should
    really have at least one fan in the front (pulling air in), and
    one fan (separate from the PSU fan) on the rear of the computer.
    If the only fan on your computers, is the PSU fan, then yes,
    you are torturing your machines.

    A 7 to 10C temperature rise inside the case, is a reasonable level
    of heating for a computer case. If the outside air is 25C, then
    the case air can rise to 32C to 35C. On one computer I have here
    (the one with the P4 in it), I had to remove some plastic grillwork
    on my computer case, to get enough air flow through the case. To
    check the temperatures, you can use Asus Probe to make some
    measurements. The side should be on the case, as if the fans are
    working properly, the best cooling should be with the side of the
    case put in place.

    HTH,
    Paul
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    I have a p4p800 revision 1 at my desk. No problems in the many months
    I've had it. Running a 2.6Ghz and MX4000. VMWare pushes the CPU up
    at times.

    We have many p4p800 boards including SE and deluxe. By many, I mean we
    probably have close to 100 of them. I don't have any way of scanning,
    but that is about how many machines we've purchased since my machine
    was built, and these all have p4p800's.
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Steve wrote:

    > I'm certain that there is a real quality problem with Asus boards now and
    > would like to know if any of you, or how many of you may have experienced
    > similar problems. I will never use another Asus board again, and I've been
    > using them and recommending them for the past 11 years.
    >

    Sorry tp hi-jack the OP's post.

    I've been watching these threads for some time now - and a lot of them
    there are too. What do these problems mean for the end-user? Do we
    simply sit tight and keep fingers crossed? Surely not.

    If one of the large food retailers or motor manufacturers, for example,
    discovered a faulty product, which constituted a risk to health and
    safety, there would be an immediate product recall. Is the ASUS
    motherboard an exception to the rule then?

    Has anyone had any success RMAing a non-faulty board, simply because of
    it's poor reputation?
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <1eZCe.6133$N91.1635@trnddc08>, no_@spam_verizon.net says...
    > A motherboard cannot run "hot". You were running P4 procs on those boards,
    > and the procs supported by those boards run at temps just below the temp at
    > the surface of the sun. I would surmise that your problems were related
    > directly to inadequate cooling. the ASUS boards you cited are very stable,
    > rock solid boards when implemented in a well cooled environment.

    Actually, the motherboard can run HOT. The non-CPU parts, like the
    Chipsets, RAM, regulators, even resistors, can all generate heat (and
    do).

    Many of the motherboard include head-sinks directly on the main chipset
    LSI chip now.

    --
    --
    spam999free@rrohio.com
    remove 999 in order to email me
  14. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    I have a P4C800-E Deluxe with dead USB. All chips look ok.....'twas
    wondering what the hey was going on. Now <sigh> I guess we know!

    Thanks to all for posting.

    z


    "Steve" <spfouche@inetnow.net> wrote in message
    news:J92dnZrBZqOKsEHfRVn-rw@comcast.com...
    > In the past 3 months I have seen 5 Asus mobos die. In the 10 years before
    > then I have only seen ONE fail. All of the boards were either the
    > P4P800-SE
    > (3), the P4P800 Deluxe (2), or the newer P5GD2 Deluxe (1) mobos. All,
    > except one, are used for AutoCAD workstations and use ATI 9600 or 9800
    > video
    > cards. At first I thought that the problem must have been a bad power
    > supply, then a bad video card, then a bad hard drive...then memory. Now,
    > I
    > realize that these boards have serious problems. First, I've noticed a
    > couple of things about all of the boards that did not apply to all of the
    > other Asus boards that I've purchase/installed over the years (about 100
    > or
    > so).
    >> -Steve
    >
    >
  15. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    edavid3001@gmail.com wrote:

    > I have a p4p800 revision 1 at my desk. No problems in the many months
    > I've had it. Running a 2.6Ghz and MX4000. VMWare pushes the CPU up
    > at times.


    5 years and more of unpaused running a Business PC, administrated by
    me. This is not possible with a P4 System. No ACPI or APM activated.
    Used for every purpose. Internet, Office, Gaming, FAX and more...

    It was (now they changed the whole system) a P54/133 and then a P55/200
    with Windows NT Workstation 4.0, Office 95, 97, XP (ascending order
    :-)).... the rest of the system was always the same. The 3.6 IBM
    Platter did very well. The system run for years, without turning off.
    And probably it would still run....

    ASUS, off course. And a big 256MB of EDO RAM.


    Best Regards,

    Daniel Mandic
  16. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <nospam-1907052323100001@192.168.1.178>, nospam@needed.com
    says...
    > My P4C800-E has been fine so far. I'm just concerned with the
    > long term prognosis, and what happens after the warranty has
    > expired.

    It's been my experience that most boards last longer than their warranty
    and that by the time you need a repair, that the technology is so far
    beyond what you want to repair, that it's a better investment to just
    buy a new board and chips to get the better performance.

    --

    spam999free@rrohio.com
    remove 999 in order to email me
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