P4P v P4V v P4S?

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

I've got a 3.0GHz pentium (prescott) cpu on a P4P800SE, which fails to
boot. With no other way of checking things out, I'm looking to buy a
cheap Celeron CPU and mainboard. I'm sorted with the CPU, but would be
interested for feedback on whether to consider a type P4V v P4S
mainboard if only to avoid the well-documented Intel latchup problem?

What do you reckon?
9 answers Last reply
More about tomshardware
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    I have the same MB and just installed a 3.2 800fsb chip all is well for the
    moment.
    I did change my memory to 3200 for the 800fsb. I do have a good PS.
    Also a 6600gt video card.
    The reason I selected this board was because of the video problems with the
    sis and via
    chipset with high end video cards and games like Doom3 and HL2.

    "PL" <"neatripple AT lineone DOT net"> wrote in message
    news:11fhr41joq6kre7@corp.supernews.com...
    > I've got a 3.0GHz pentium (prescott) cpu on a P4P800SE, which fails to
    > boot. With no other way of checking things out, I'm looking to buy a
    > cheap Celeron CPU and mainboard. I'm sorted with the CPU, but would be
    > interested for feedback on whether to consider a type P4V v P4S mainboard
    > if only to avoid the well-documented Intel latchup problem?
    >
    > What do you reckon?
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    I have a P4P800 SE with P4 3.2 Ghz 2GB RAM.
    It is normal, for me, to have boot problem.
    I have always (90%) to press the HW reset button to boot.
    It seems to be a PSU problem, I have changed my 300W PSU with a 550W PSU but
    nothing is changed.
    At the momentI have no idea, someone is advising me to change an other time
    my PSU with an other kind of PSU but for now I'm waiting.

    Good luck and let me know if you are able to solve the problem

    Alberto

    "PL" <"neatripple AT lineone DOT net"> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:11fhr41joq6kre7@corp.supernews.com...
    > I've got a 3.0GHz pentium (prescott) cpu on a P4P800SE, which fails to
    > boot. With no other way of checking things out, I'm looking to buy a
    > cheap Celeron CPU and mainboard. I'm sorted with the CPU, but would be
    > interested for feedback on whether to consider a type P4V v P4S mainboard
    > if only to avoid the well-documented Intel latchup problem?
    >
    > What do you reckon?
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <11fhr41joq6kre7@corp.supernews.com>, PL <"neatripple AT
    lineone DOT net"> wrote:

    > I've got a 3.0GHz pentium (prescott) cpu on a P4P800SE, which fails to
    > boot. With no other way of checking things out, I'm looking to buy a
    > cheap Celeron CPU and mainboard. I'm sorted with the CPU, but would be
    > interested for feedback on whether to consider a type P4V v P4S
    > mainboard if only to avoid the well-documented Intel latchup problem?
    >
    > What do you reckon?

    All motherboards have some weakness or unsavory behavior. Until
    the latchup problem appeared, I would recommend the Intel chipsets.
    If Intel was out of the question, I might try an SIS board next.
    Newegg has a couple models in the $50 range, which might be suitable
    as a testing platform. As always, use Google and some other search
    engine, and search based on the motherboard model number, or the
    part number of the chipset chips (Northbridge and Southbridge), to
    see if there are any issues with the board you have in mind.

    An alternative solution, is buy an Intel chipset based board,
    a separate PCI USB card for your USB peripherals, and a PS/2
    keyboard (so you can access the BIOS screens). That will remove
    most of the apparent risk from using an ICH4 or ICH5 southbridge.
    If you don't use the motherboard USB ports or the motherboard USB
    headers, that could reduce the latchup risk by a factor of 10 or
    so.

    Paul
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Alb wrote:
    > I have a P4P800 SE with P4 3.2 Ghz 2GB RAM.
    > It is normal, for me, to have boot problem.
    > I have always (90%) to press the HW reset button to boot.
    > It seems to be a PSU problem, I have changed my 300W PSU with a 550W PSU but
    > nothing is changed.
    > At the momentI have no idea, someone is advising me to change an other time
    > my PSU with an other kind of PSU but for now I'm waiting.
    >
    > Good luck and let me know if you are able to solve the problem
    >
    > Alberto
    >

    Today I set the PC up and after 5 (hard) re-boots, it finally got
    working. There is one post on the ASUS forum about this 'problem', but
    no explanation/solution.

    I have a 500w psu that according to ASUS PCProbe outputs as follows:

    +3.3v @ +3.44v
    +12v @ 12.22v
    +5v @ +5.16v
    Vcore @ 1.404v
    CPU temp 37 C

    Does anyone see a problem here?
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <11fk8rbff56iraf@corp.supernews.com>, PL <"neatripple AT
    lineone DOT net"> wrote:

    > Alb wrote:
    > > I have a P4P800 SE with P4 3.2 Ghz 2GB RAM.
    > > It is normal, for me, to have boot problem.
    > > I have always (90%) to press the HW reset button to boot.
    > > It seems to be a PSU problem, I have changed my 300W PSU with a 550W
    PSU but
    > > nothing is changed.
    > > At the momentI have no idea, someone is advising me to change an other time
    > > my PSU with an other kind of PSU but for now I'm waiting.
    > >
    > > Good luck and let me know if you are able to solve the problem
    > >
    > > Alberto
    > >
    >
    > Today I set the PC up and after 5 (hard) re-boots, it finally got
    > working. There is one post on the ASUS forum about this 'problem', but
    > no explanation/solution.
    >
    > I have a 500w psu that according to ASUS PCProbe outputs as follows:
    >
    > +3.3v @ +3.44v
    > +12v @ 12.22v
    > +5v @ +5.16v
    > Vcore @ 1.404v
    > CPU temp 37 C
    >
    > Does anyone see a problem here?

    Percentage wise, your voltages are still in the "normal" range,
    although I'd want to verify the voltages with a multimeter.

    A failure to POST could have any number of root causes. One
    reason is if the Vcore regulator circuit abruptly shuts down
    when the system is powered up. One model of motherboard had
    issues with Antec Truepower supplies, and the problem was
    corrected in subsequent production by changing some component
    value. Otherwise, it could be just about any component sitting
    on a system bus, that could throw a wrench in the works.

    If you had just CPU, memory, video card, keyboard/mouse, does
    it work any better ? Try testing with just one DIMM at a time.

    If you switch power supplies, try using a different brand of
    supply.

    In terms of gathering information, if the motherboard had
    Vocal POST, you could listen for any error message, as that
    might hint at the source of the problem. There is also a
    debugging card you can get, that plugs into a PCI slot, and
    it intercepts writes to port 80, and displays them on a
    two digit LED display. The BIOS companies have lists of
    which BIOS routine is running, when a particular number
    is being displayed. A port 80 POST card used to cost $100,
    but some Ebay sellers have sold them for $20, as they really
    don't have a lot of expensive chips on the card.

    Here is an example of a diagnostic PCI POST card:
    http://cgi.ebay.com/PC-PCI-Motherboard-Diagnostic-Post-Code-Card-Test-Probe_W0QQitemZ6791398721QQcategoryZ1244QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

    The main value of a PCI POST card, is it can show you whether
    the processor got to execute any code or not. Another device
    that provides a little info like that, is the LED displays
    on some expensive memories. A failure to see any acivity on
    the DIMM's LED display can be used to imply that the BIOS code
    never tried to initialize memory.

    In terms of buying a good power supply for your computer, you
    should be buying them based on the rating information printed
    on the label on the side. Many of the cheaper supplies give
    an exaggerated total power rating for the supply - if,
    for example, the supply doesn't offer a minimum of 12V@15A
    output, I would expect problems with a P4 based system. There
    were some old 500W supplies (when 500 watters first came out),
    that only offered 12V@10A. Such supplies were only usable on
    AthlonXP systems, where the +5V was the main source of
    motherboard power. On my P4C800-E Deluxe, using four DIMMs,
    my measured consumption is 3.3V@14.4 amps, 5V@0.6 amps, and
    12V@6amps. This does not include the video card, or the disk
    drives. In my case, it is meant to show that not much +5V is
    used, a moderate amount of 3.3V, and the +12V can be calculated
    based on the model of processor being used, at a site like this:

    http://takaman.jp/D/?english

    I only have a 2.8GHz Northwood, so don't use that much +12V.

    Paul
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    I'll bet if you disconnect your hard drive and boot from a floppy or cdrom
    your problem may go away and if it does then it is your power supply

    "PL" <"neatripple AT lineone DOT net"> wrote in message
    news:11fhr41joq6kre7@corp.supernews.com...
    > I've got a 3.0GHz pentium (prescott) cpu on a P4P800SE, which fails to
    > boot. With no other way of checking things out, I'm looking to buy a
    > cheap Celeron CPU and mainboard. I'm sorted with the CPU, but would be
    > interested for feedback on whether to consider a type P4V v P4S mainboard
    > if only to avoid the well-documented Intel latchup problem?
    >
    > What do you reckon?
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    BigJim wrote:
    > I'll bet if you disconnect your hard drive and boot from a floppy or cdrom
    > your problem may go away and if it does then it is your power supply
    >
    > "PL" <"neatripple AT lineone DOT net"> wrote in message
    > news:11fhr41joq6kre7@corp.supernews.com...
    >
    >>I've got a 3.0GHz pentium (prescott) cpu on a P4P800SE, which fails to
    >>boot. With no other way of checking things out, I'm looking to buy a
    >>cheap Celeron CPU and mainboard. I'm sorted with the CPU, but would be
    >>interested for feedback on whether to consider a type P4V v P4S mainboard
    >>if only to avoid the well-documented Intel latchup problem?
    >>
    >>What do you reckon?
    >
    >
    >
    I disconnected the hard drive and no floppy seek on boot-up, nothing,
    nadda...
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Well it is 4 times (a lot...) that the boot is ok.
    The tricks was : press and release quickly the start button.
    I tried it because once I keept the start button down for a while and I have
    had an overclockig error (??!!??) (I'm not using overclock)
    It is strange .... but seems to work

    Alb
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    End of the dream ......

    "Alb" <alb460@nospam.virgilio.it> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:yZ_Ke.67292$fm.4413879@news4.tin.it...
    > Well it is 4 times (a lot...) that the boot is ok.
    > The tricks was : press and release quickly the start button.
    > I tried it because once I keept the start button down for a while and I
    > have had an overclockig error (??!!??) (I'm not using overclock)
    > It is strange .... but seems to work
    >
    > Alb
    >
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