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XP won't boot after changing motherboard and processor

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Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
September 17, 2004 7:31:38 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I have a system that I burned up a motherboard and processor and so those
two items have now been replaced. All other hardware remains the same. Now
when I boot, I get a white bar scrolling across the bottom and then the
system halts. Booting into Safe Mode produces similar results only listing
the files as they load and it halts. Knowing that there would be
re-activation issues with XP, I assumed that I would at least be able to
boot and then somehow re-activate with Microsoft after that. I guess I was
wrong.

I have searched the Microsoft site and cannot find any KB articles that
discuss the procedure in dealing with this issue. Does anyone know?
September 17, 2004 7:31:39 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

This is a guess, when you change out the board/cpu, whats
was install in your hard drive about old board and setup
still there, you could try a fresh install of OS with
drivers from new board. Like i said its a guess. Good luck
>-----Original Message-----
>I have a system that I burned up a motherboard and
processor and so those
>two items have now been replaced. All other hardware
remains the same. Now
>when I boot, I get a white bar scrolling across the
bottom and then the
>system halts. Booting into Safe Mode produces similar
results only listing
>the files as they load and it halts. Knowing that there
would be
>re-activation issues with XP, I assumed that I would at
least be able to
>boot and then somehow re-activate with Microsoft after
that. I guess I was
>wrong.
>
>I have searched the Microsoft site and cannot find any KB
articles that
>discuss the procedure in dealing with this issue. Does
anyone know?
>
>
>.
>
September 17, 2004 7:31:40 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Repair Install to SET XP to New Motherboard
1. Do Not BOOT into Windows XP on first boot after Motherboard or Hard Drive
change! If booting from CD is not an option, return to BIOS and make sure
booting from CD is the first boot option. Booting into Windows is only an
option when you do a direct replacement of the Motherboard.
2. If your computer does not support booting from the CD, check your OEM or
Motherboard makers web site for updated BIOS.
3. Perform a Repair Install by following the step by step below.
When you see the "Welcome To Setup" screen, you will see the options below
This portion of the Setup program prepares Microsoft
Windows XP to run on your computer:

To setup Windows XP now, press ENTER.

To repair a Windows XP installation using Recovery Console, press R.

To quit Setup without installing Windows XP, press F3.
Press Enter to start the Windows Setup.
Accept the License Agreement and Windows will search for existing Windows
installations.
Select the XP installation you want to repair from the list and press R to
start the repair.
Setup will copy the necessary files to the hard drive and reboot. Do not
press any key to boot from CD when the message appears. Setup will continue
as if it were doing a clean install, but your applications and settings will
remain intact.

Of course all this is based upon your copy of Windows being one of the Full
retail Version [Home, Pro, Academic - full or upgrade edition].

If you have an OEM version of XP that came with a new computer purchse it is
a violation of the Terms and COnditions of the Microsoft End User Licence
AGreement to change CPU / Motherboard. You will need to buy a full retail
version as identified above.


"lobster" wrote:

> This is a guess, when you change out the board/cpu, whats
> was install in your hard drive about old board and setup
> still there, you could try a fresh install of OS with
> drivers from new board. Like i said its a guess. Good luck
> >-----Original Message-----
> >I have a system that I burned up a motherboard and
> processor and so those
> >two items have now been replaced. All other hardware
> remains the same. Now
> >when I boot, I get a white bar scrolling across the
> bottom and then the
> >system halts. Booting into Safe Mode produces similar
> results only listing
> >the files as they load and it halts. Knowing that there
> would be
> >re-activation issues with XP, I assumed that I would at
> least be able to
> >boot and then somehow re-activate with Microsoft after
> that. I guess I was
> >wrong.
> >
> >I have searched the Microsoft site and cannot find any KB
> articles that
> >discuss the procedure in dealing with this issue. Does
> anyone know?
> >
> >
> >.
> >
>
Related resources
September 17, 2004 9:40:49 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Hi:


Looks like we're on the same boat. A few days ago, I had a small wish to
boost up the performance of my home desktop PC (after SP2) and server, so I
sent them to upgrade M/B, CPU, and DRAM and both were dead.

So far, I am still working on the desktop system to put everything back to
normal.

In any case, BAR's instructions are pretty much detailed is what I did for
the desktop. So far, everything looks the same, even the second
installation of SP2 just passed smoothly, but I have yet to test each
installed applications.

This site is what I found after the nightmare. It also contains many
information about Windows installation including due to hardware changes.
http://www.windowsreinstall.com/indexwinxppro.htm

You can also take a look at it.

Just for your information -

(1) I read some articles (maybe in that site or else), that it should NOT
choose repair installation at the first ask. Instead, shall just choose
normal installation and select the folder already has Windows, and
installation will ask you if you need to repair and then answer Yes at this
time. Please do verify this and until you have come up the same article
before using this way. I did what BAR suggested before came across that
article. I am not sure the difference and certainly don't want to try to
find out.

(2) If you plan to use Internet to re-activate. Make sure your network card
will function promptly after re-installation before anything else so that
you can activate. Windows told me that I have 3 days to activate it, but it
only gave me 1 1/2 days and then won't even let me log in and at the time,
the onboard LAN chip was malfunctioned. I had to call MS although it is
quick though.

Good luck and hope this will help.

--
Business executive who believes technology but don't want to be messed
around.

"BAR" <BAR@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:491A6860-7F1E-4D91-8DD5-66033E2C32C4@microsoft.com...
> Repair Install to SET XP to New Motherboard
> 1. Do Not BOOT into Windows XP on first boot after Motherboard or Hard
> Drive
> change! If booting from CD is not an option, return to BIOS and make sure
> booting from CD is the first boot option. Booting into Windows is only an
> option when you do a direct replacement of the Motherboard.
> 2. If your computer does not support booting from the CD, check your OEM
> or
> Motherboard makers web site for updated BIOS.
> 3. Perform a Repair Install by following the step by step below.
> When you see the "Welcome To Setup" screen, you will see the options below
> This portion of the Setup program prepares Microsoft
> Windows XP to run on your computer:
>
> To setup Windows XP now, press ENTER.
>
> To repair a Windows XP installation using Recovery Console, press R.
>
> To quit Setup without installing Windows XP, press F3.
> Press Enter to start the Windows Setup.
> Accept the License Agreement and Windows will search for existing Windows
> installations.
> Select the XP installation you want to repair from the list and press R to
> start the repair.
> Setup will copy the necessary files to the hard drive and reboot. Do not
> press any key to boot from CD when the message appears. Setup will
> continue
> as if it were doing a clean install, but your applications and settings
> will
> remain intact.
>
> Of course all this is based upon your copy of Windows being one of the
> Full
> retail Version [Home, Pro, Academic - full or upgrade edition].
>
> If you have an OEM version of XP that came with a new computer purchse it
> is
> a violation of the Terms and COnditions of the Microsoft End User Licence
> AGreement to change CPU / Motherboard. You will need to buy a full retail
> version as identified above.
>
>
> "lobster" wrote:
>
>> This is a guess, when you change out the board/cpu, whats
>> was install in your hard drive about old board and setup
>> still there, you could try a fresh install of OS with
>> drivers from new board. Like i said its a guess. Good luck
>> >-----Original Message-----
>> >I have a system that I burned up a motherboard and
>> processor and so those
>> >two items have now been replaced. All other hardware
>> remains the same. Now
>> >when I boot, I get a white bar scrolling across the
>> bottom and then the
>> >system halts. Booting into Safe Mode produces similar
>> results only listing
>> >the files as they load and it halts. Knowing that there
>> would be
>> >re-activation issues with XP, I assumed that I would at
>> least be able to
>> >boot and then somehow re-activate with Microsoft after
>> that. I guess I was
>> >wrong.
>> >
>> >I have searched the Microsoft site and cannot find any KB
>> articles that
>> >discuss the procedure in dealing with this issue. Does
>> anyone know?
>> >
>> >
>> >.
>> >
>>
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
September 17, 2004 11:46:20 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

austinpctech wrote:
> I have a system that I burned up a motherboard and processor and so
> those two items have now been replaced. All other hardware remains
> the same. Now when I boot, I get a white bar scrolling across the
> bottom and then the system halts. Booting into Safe Mode produces
> similar results only listing the files as they load and it halts.
> Knowing that there would be re-activation issues with XP, I assumed
> that I would at least be able to boot and then somehow re-activate
> with Microsoft after that. I guess I was wrong.
>
> I have searched the Microsoft site and cannot find any KB articles
> that discuss the procedure in dealing with this issue. Does anyone
> know?


Normally, and assuming a retail license (many OEM installations
and licenses are not transferable to a new motherboard - check yours
before starting), unless the new motherboard is virtually identical
(same chipset, same IDE controllers, same BIOS version, etc.) to the
one on which the WinXP installation was originally performed, you'll
need to perform a repair (a.k.a. in-place upgrade) installation, at
the very least:

How to Perform an In-Place Upgrade of Windows XP
http://support.microsoft.com/directory/article.asp?ID=K...;EN-US;Q315341

The "why" is quite simple, really, and has nothing to do with
licensing issues, per se; it's a purely technical matter, at this
point. You've pulled the proverbial hardware rug out from under the
OS. (If you don't like -- or get -- the rug analogy, think of it as
picking up a Cape Cod style home and then setting it down onto a Ranch
style foundation. It just isn't going to fit.) WinXP, like Win2K
before it, is not nearly as "promiscuous" as Win9x when it comes to
accepting any old hardware configuration you throw at it. On
installation it "tailors" itself to the specific hardware found. This
is one of the reasons that the entire WinNT/2K/XP OS family is so much
more stable than the Win9x group.

As always when undertaking such a significant change, back up any
important data before starting.

This will also probably require re-activation, unless you have a
Volume Licensed version of WinXP Pro installed. If it's been more
than 120 days since you last activated that specific Product Key,
you'll most likely be able to activate via the internet without
problem. If it's been less, you might have to make a 5 minute phone
call.

--

Bruce Chambers

Help us help you:
http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on
having
both at once. - RAH
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
September 19, 2004 2:00:36 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I had the same problem MSI board to an AUS board, repair
install didn't work for me - it had to be a complete re-
install (and re-activation) of Xp. Bummer isn't it.

Now it won't recognise my onboard AC97 or LAN .....

Hugh
>-----Original Message-----
>austinpctech wrote:
>> I have a system that I burned up a motherboard and
processor and so
>> those two items have now been replaced. All other
hardware remains
>> the same. Now when I boot, I get a white bar
scrolling across the
>> bottom and then the system halts. Booting into Safe
Mode produces
>> similar results only listing the files as they load
and it halts.
>> Knowing that there would be re-activation issues with
XP, I assumed
>> that I would at least be able to boot and then somehow
re-activate
>> with Microsoft after that. I guess I was wrong.
>>
>> I have searched the Microsoft site and cannot find any
KB articles
>> that discuss the procedure in dealing with this
issue. Does anyone
>> know?
>
>
> Normally, and assuming a retail license (many OEM
installations
>and licenses are not transferable to a new motherboard -
check yours
>before starting), unless the new motherboard is
virtually identical
>(same chipset, same IDE controllers, same BIOS version,
etc.) to the
>one on which the WinXP installation was originally
performed, you'll
>need to perform a repair (a.k.a. in-place upgrade)
installation, at
>the very least:
>
>How to Perform an In-Place Upgrade of Windows XP
>http://support.microsoft.com/directory/article.asp?
ID=KB;EN-US;Q315341
>
> The "why" is quite simple, really, and has nothing
to do with
>licensing issues, per se; it's a purely technical
matter, at this
>point. You've pulled the proverbial hardware rug out
from under the
>OS. (If you don't like -- or get -- the rug analogy,
think of it as
>picking up a Cape Cod style home and then setting it
down onto a Ranch
>style foundation. It just isn't going to fit.) WinXP,
like Win2K
>before it, is not nearly as "promiscuous" as Win9x when
it comes to
>accepting any old hardware configuration you throw at
it. On
>installation it "tailors" itself to the specific
hardware found. This
>is one of the reasons that the entire WinNT/2K/XP OS
family is so much
>more stable than the Win9x group.
>
> As always when undertaking such a significant
change, back up any
>important data before starting.
>
> This will also probably require re-activation,
unless you have a
>Volume Licensed version of WinXP Pro installed. If it's
been more
>than 120 days since you last activated that specific
Product Key,
>you'll most likely be able to activate via the internet
without
>problem. If it's been less, you might have to make a 5
minute phone
>call.
>
>--
>
>Bruce Chambers
>
>Help us help you:
>http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
>http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
>
>You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever
count on
>having
>both at once. - RAH
>
>
>
>.
>
!