A8N-E running slow

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Built a new system for just over a week, based as follows

A8N-E, with Venice 3500
1Gig memory
Windows Xp hjome
dvd rewriter
ati x800 graphics
Hitachio deskstar SATA II drive.

The system ran fine for a few days, but now has started to run very slow,ie
takes an age to load all programmes.
have fiddled with all settings,only oddity is BIOS post reports the hard
drive as SATA I not II. Bios is latest 1008, chip drivers also latest from
asus website.

Any ideas ???

Thanks
7 answers Last reply
More about running slow
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Bitstring <431df9cc$0$1294$ed2619ec@ptn-nntp-reader02.plus.net>, from
    the wonderful person John <jb@bigone.plus.com> said
    >Built a new system for just over a week, based as follows
    >
    >A8N-E, with Venice 3500
    >1Gig memory
    >Windows Xp hjome
    >dvd rewriter
    >ati x800 graphics
    >Hitachio deskstar SATA II drive.
    >
    >The system ran fine for a few days, but now has started to run very slow,ie
    >takes an age to load all programmes.
    >have fiddled with all settings,only oddity is BIOS post reports the hard
    >drive as SATA I not II. Bios is latest 1008, chip drivers also latest from
    >asus website.
    >
    >Any ideas ???

    What does Task manager show is going on in terms of CPU and memory
    usage? How up-to-date is your virus and malware scanner??

    --
    GSV Three Minds in a Can
    Contact recommends the use of Firefox; SC recommends it at gunpoint.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Latest Norton Internet security and Windows Spyware installed.
    Just updated the HD using a utility from Hitachi. This is now correctly
    reported in Biios, but pc still running slow
    "GSV Three Minds in a Can" <GSV@quik.clara.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:IPTpncBTvfHDFAv5@from.is.invalid...
    > Bitstring <431df9cc$0$1294$ed2619ec@ptn-nntp-reader02.plus.net>, from the
    > wonderful person John <jb@bigone.plus.com> said
    >>Built a new system for just over a week, based as follows
    >>
    >>A8N-E, with Venice 3500
    >>1Gig memory
    >>Windows Xp hjome
    >>dvd rewriter
    >>ati x800 graphics
    >>Hitachio deskstar SATA II drive.
    >>
    >>The system ran fine for a few days, but now has started to run very
    >>slow,ie
    >>takes an age to load all programmes.
    >>have fiddled with all settings,only oddity is BIOS post reports the hard
    >>drive as SATA I not II. Bios is latest 1008, chip drivers also latest from
    >>asus website.
    >>
    >>Any ideas ???
    >
    > What does Task manager show is going on in terms of CPU and memory usage?
    > How up-to-date is your virus and malware scanner??
    >
    > --
    > GSV Three Minds in a Can
    > Contact recommends the use of Firefox; SC recommends it at gunpoint.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Bitstring <431e0d27$0$17503$ed2e19e4@ptn-nntp-reader04.plus.net>, from
    the wonderful person John <jb@bigone.plus.com> said
    >Latest Norton Internet security and Windows Spyware installed.
    >Just updated the HD using a utility from Hitachi. This is now correctly
    >reported in Biios, but pc still running slow

    SATA1 vs 2 is a red herring - the drive can't deliver enough bytes per
    second to even trouble SATA1 .. something else is the problem.

    You can probably eliminate the CPU/memory subsystem by running the
    Prime95 benchmarks and comparing the answers with what others get (it's
    always possible that your FSB got turned down, your CPU cache got
    disabled, or something whacky like that). Or just run one of the other
    benchmark utilities (AIDA32, or whatever) to check nothing daft has
    occurred.

    If you think it is the disk, the try HDTACH (google for it), or similar.

    Norton itself may be a problem, being renowned bloatware. However it's
    such a PITA to disable/remove that it's probably better to try
    everything else first.

    Did you defrag the disk any time recently?

    --
    GSV Three Minds in a Can
    Contact recommends the use of Firefox; SC recommends it at gunpoint.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <431e0d27$0$17503$ed2e19e4@ptn-nntp-reader04.plus.net>, "John"
    <jb@bigone.plus.com> wrote:

    > Latest Norton Internet security and Windows Spyware installed.
    > Just updated the HD using a utility from Hitachi. This is now correctly
    > reported in Biios, but pc still running slow
    > "GSV Three Minds in a Can" <GSV@quik.clara.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:IPTpncBTvfHDFAv5@from.is.invalid...
    > > Bitstring <431df9cc$0$1294$ed2619ec@ptn-nntp-reader02.plus.net>, from the
    > > wonderful person John <jb@bigone.plus.com> said
    > >>Built a new system for just over a week, based as follows
    > >>
    > >>A8N-E, with Venice 3500
    > >>1Gig memory
    > >>Windows Xp hjome
    > >>dvd rewriter
    > >>ati x800 graphics
    > >>Hitachio deskstar SATA II drive.
    > >>
    > >>The system ran fine for a few days, but now has started to run very
    > >>slow,ie
    > >>takes an age to load all programmes.
    > >>have fiddled with all settings,only oddity is BIOS post reports the hard
    > >>drive as SATA I not II. Bios is latest 1008, chip drivers also latest from
    > >>asus website.
    > >>
    > >>Any ideas ???
    > >
    > > What does Task manager show is going on in terms of CPU and memory usage?
    > > How up-to-date is your virus and malware scanner??
    > >
    > > --
    > > GSV Three Minds in a Can
    > > Contact recommends the use of Firefox; SC recommends it at gunpoint.

    Could it be a disk transfer rate issue ?

    Check the IDE transfer rate of the disk. If Windows detects CRC
    errors while doing operations on the disk, it will downclock the
    transfer rate from the disk. The disk may start doing DMA at
    100MB/sec, but can end up doing PIO at ~4MB/sec, if Windows uses
    the slowest possible transfer mode. (I presume this is still
    possible, even though there is SATA in the path.)

    This article discusses how Windows treats disk errors, and
    how you can end up being "downshifted" to PIO mode:

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;817472

      "After the Windows IDE/ATAPI Port driver (Atapi.sys) receives a
       cumulative total of six time-out or cyclical redundancy check
       (CRC) errors, the driver reduces the communications speed (the
       transfer mode ) from the highest Direct Memory Access (DMA) mode
       to lower DMA modes in steps. If the driver continues to receive
       time-out or CRC errors, the driver eventually reduces the transfer
        mode to the slowest mode (PIO mode )."

    Workaround:

    http://groups.google.com/group/microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware/msg/754224f4bbc59997

    HTH,
    Paul
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Ru HDtach and results come out ok,also have uninstalled disk controller
    driver, but to no avail.
    This may sound like a stupid question, but why is the cpu sold as having a
    fsb of 1000mhz, but in the bios only shows to be a fsb of 200 mhz even
    though the resulting system speed with multiplier is correct ??
    "Paul" <nospam@needed.com> wrote in message
    news:nospam-0609052115040001@192.168.1.178...
    > In article <431e0d27$0$17503$ed2e19e4@ptn-nntp-reader04.plus.net>, "John"
    > <jb@bigone.plus.com> wrote:
    >
    >> Latest Norton Internet security and Windows Spyware installed.
    >> Just updated the HD using a utility from Hitachi. This is now correctly
    >> reported in Biios, but pc still running slow
    >> "GSV Three Minds in a Can" <GSV@quik.clara.co.uk> wrote in message
    >> news:IPTpncBTvfHDFAv5@from.is.invalid...
    >> > Bitstring <431df9cc$0$1294$ed2619ec@ptn-nntp-reader02.plus.net>, from
    >> > the
    >> > wonderful person John <jb@bigone.plus.com> said
    >> >>Built a new system for just over a week, based as follows
    >> >>
    >> >>A8N-E, with Venice 3500
    >> >>1Gig memory
    >> >>Windows Xp hjome
    >> >>dvd rewriter
    >> >>ati x800 graphics
    >> >>Hitachio deskstar SATA II drive.
    >> >>
    >> >>The system ran fine for a few days, but now has started to run very
    >> >>slow,ie
    >> >>takes an age to load all programmes.
    >> >>have fiddled with all settings,only oddity is BIOS post reports the
    >> >>hard
    >> >>drive as SATA I not II. Bios is latest 1008, chip drivers also latest
    >> >>from
    >> >>asus website.
    >> >>
    >> >>Any ideas ???
    >> >
    >> > What does Task manager show is going on in terms of CPU and memory
    >> > usage?
    >> > How up-to-date is your virus and malware scanner??
    >> >
    >> > --
    >> > GSV Three Minds in a Can
    >> > Contact recommends the use of Firefox; SC recommends it at gunpoint.
    >
    > Could it be a disk transfer rate issue ?
    >
    > Check the IDE transfer rate of the disk. If Windows detects CRC
    > errors while doing operations on the disk, it will downclock the
    > transfer rate from the disk. The disk may start doing DMA at
    > 100MB/sec, but can end up doing PIO at ~4MB/sec, if Windows uses
    > the slowest possible transfer mode. (I presume this is still
    > possible, even though there is SATA in the path.)
    >
    > This article discusses how Windows treats disk errors, and
    > how you can end up being "downshifted" to PIO mode:
    >
    > http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;817472
    >
    > "After the Windows IDE/ATAPI Port driver (Atapi.sys) receives a
    > cumulative total of six time-out or cyclical redundancy check
    > (CRC) errors, the driver reduces the communications speed (the
    > transfer mode ) from the highest Direct Memory Access (DMA) mode
    > to lower DMA modes in steps. If the driver continues to receive
    > time-out or CRC errors, the driver eventually reduces the transfer
    > mode to the slowest mode (PIO mode )."
    >
    > Workaround:
    >
    > http://groups.google.com/group/microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware/msg/754224f4bbc59997
    >
    > HTH,
    > Paul
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    In article <431f0ec0$0$17460$ed2e19e4@ptn-nntp-reader04.plus.net>, "John"
    <jb@bigone.plus.com> wrote:

    > Ru HDtach and results come out ok,also have uninstalled disk controller
    > driver, but to no avail.
    > This may sound like a stupid question, but why is the cpu sold as having a
    > fsb of 1000mhz, but in the bios only shows to be a fsb of 200 mhz even
    > though the resulting system speed with multiplier is correct ??

    To answer that, we need a block diagram of the Athlon64. This
    AMD doc is the source of my figure below - page 8:

    http://www.amd.com/us-en/assets/content_type/white_papers_and_tech_docs/Hammer_architecture_WP_2.pdf

    CPU_Core
    |
    SRQ (system_request_queue)
    |
    XBAR---MCT---DCT
    ^ | ^ ^
    | | | |
    16 / / 16 64 / / 64
    | | | |
    | v v v 8bytesxDDR400 per DIMM = 3.2GB/sec
    Hypertransport Memory 6.4GB/sec total, two channels

    Hypertransport ==> CLKx2(DDR)x#bits/8bits_per_byte
    = 1000MHz x 2 x 16 / 8 = 4GB/sec (each direction)

    CPU_clock x multiplier = CPU_core_clock 200 x 11 = 2200 (3500+)
    CPU_clock x LDT_multiplier = HT_clock ex. 200 x 5 = 1000
    CPU_core_clock / divider = Memory_clock 2200/11 = 200 (DDR400)

    To see examples of divider choices used by the processor, see posting
    #7 in this thread. (Oskar Wu designs DFI Athlon64 motherboards AFAIK.)
    The divider is set according to the user's "target" DRAM speed.

    http://xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=41595&highlight=divider

    If the BIOS is showing "200" for something, that is the setting of
    the clock generator chip. The rest of the clocks are derived from
    that clock signal, via the various multipliers and dividers.

    I'm not sure the concept of front side bus (FSB) is that useful
    here. You might consider the FSB to be the bus at the top of the
    SRQ, but unless someone tells us the width and the speed, we'd
    never know what it was. Because the Northbridge functions are
    more distributed in this architecture, with memory control in
    the processor, and video card interface on the chipset, the
    traditional FSB concept is kind of fuzzy.

    Just a guess,
    Paul
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

    Bitstring <431f0ec0$0$17460$ed2e19e4@ptn-nntp-reader04.plus.net>, from
    the wonderful person John <jb@bigone.plus.com> said
    >Ru HDtach and results come out ok,also have uninstalled disk controller
    >driver, but to no avail.
    >This may sound like a stupid question, but why is the cpu sold as having a
    >fsb of 1000mhz, but in the bios only shows to be a fsb of 200 mhz even
    >though the resulting system speed with multiplier is correct ??

    The marketing department have been at work again if you were sold a
    '1000Mhz FSB' Athlon. Actually the whole concept of FSB makes not much
    sense these days .. but hey, these are the same guys who claim 400Mhz
    for FSB on DDR memory buses (completely ignoring what a Hz means).

    At least they got the 200 right this time - that's the basic CPU clock,
    which, as you say, you multiply by the multiplier (hey, another
    unscrewed with term .. so far!) to get the CPU frequency.

    --
    GSV Three Minds in a Can
    Contact recommends the use of Firefox; SC recommends it at gunpoint.
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