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P4P800-E Deluxe: SATA slower than PATA drives???

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  • Asus
  • SATA
  • Configuration
  • Motherboards
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Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
September 24, 2005 3:52:51 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Hi,

My original configuration consisted two PATA Maxtor 160gb drives on the
promise controller in a non-raid IDE configuration. These drives at boot up
show up in the promise bios as UDMA6 drives and are operating at the optimum
speed.

I then installed a new WD 360gb SATA drive on the Intel controller with a
fresh operating system (XPsp2) and made it the bootable drive. Since this
drive is SATA I expected equal or better performance than the original
Maxtor PATA drive installation but it was noticeably slower in every aspect
with just the operating system and a few programs installed.

I went into the bios and noticed the SATA drive was auto configuring as
UDMA5 on the Intel controller.

I then plugged the drive into the promise SATA connector on the MB and again
at boot up it showed up as a UDMA5 drive where the other two PATA drives
show up as UDMA6.

I have gone into the bios and made all the correct adjustments I believe.
When connected to the Intel controller I set the following:

"Onboard IDE Operate Mode" [Enhanced]
"Enhanced Mode Support On" [S-ATA]
"Configure SATA as RAID" [No]

The Maxtor drives are noticeably faster at 133mb/s than the new WD SATA
drive which I believe is running at 100mb/s.

How can I get the new SATA drive up to speed.

Thanks for any help!! Martin

More about : p4p800 deluxe sata slower pata drives

Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
September 24, 2005 11:39:26 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

Martin Hirsch wrote:

> Hi,
>
> My original configuration consisted two PATA Maxtor 160gb drives on
> the promise controller in a non-raid IDE configuration. These drives
> at boot up show up in the promise bios as UDMA6 drives and are
> operating at the optimum speed.
>
> I then installed a new WD 360gb SATA drive on the Intel controller
> with a fresh operating system (XPsp2) and made it the bootable drive.
> Since this drive is SATA I expected equal or better performance than
> the original Maxtor PATA drive installation but it was noticeably
> slower in every aspect with just the operating system and a few
> programs installed.
>
> I went into the bios and noticed the SATA drive was auto configuring
> as UDMA5 on the Intel controller.
>
> I then plugged the drive into the promise SATA connector on the MB
> and again at boot up it showed up as a UDMA5 drive where the other
> two PATA drives show up as UDMA6.
>
> I have gone into the bios and made all the correct adjustments I
> believe. When connected to the Intel controller I set the following:
>
> "Onboard IDE Operate Mode" [Enhanced]
> "Enhanced Mode Support On" [S-ATA]
> "Configure SATA as RAID" [No]
>
> The Maxtor drives are noticeably faster at 133mb/s than the new WD
> SATA drive which I believe is running at 100mb/s.
>
> How can I get the new SATA drive up to speed.
>
> Thanks for any help!! Martin



Hi Martin!


Not even that, also (a good drived) AGP is faster than PCIx.




Best Regards,

Daniel Mandic
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
September 24, 2005 12:27:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

In article <6J6Ze.24619$sx2.10462@fed1read02>,
martinhirschREMOVEspam@cox.net says...
> Hi,
>
> My original configuration consisted two PATA Maxtor 160gb drives on the
> promise controller in a non-raid IDE configuration. These drives at boot up
> show up in the promise bios as UDMA6 drives and are operating at the optimum
> speed.
>
> I then installed a new WD 360gb SATA drive on the Intel controller with a
> fresh operating system (XPsp2) and made it the bootable drive. Since this
> drive is SATA I expected equal or better performance than the original
> Maxtor PATA drive installation but it was noticeably slower in every aspect
> with just the operating system and a few programs installed.
>
> I went into the bios and noticed the SATA drive was auto configuring as
> UDMA5 on the Intel controller.
>
> I then plugged the drive into the promise SATA connector on the MB and again
> at boot up it showed up as a UDMA5 drive where the other two PATA drives
> show up as UDMA6.
>
> I have gone into the bios and made all the correct adjustments I believe.
> When connected to the Intel controller I set the following:
>
> "Onboard IDE Operate Mode" [Enhanced]
> "Enhanced Mode Support On" [S-ATA]
> "Configure SATA as RAID" [No]
>
> The Maxtor drives are noticeably faster at 133mb/s than the new WD SATA
> drive which I believe is running at 100mb/s.
>
> How can I get the new SATA drive up to speed.

Keep in mind that the speed rates for the two drive types are not
the speeds of the disks but only the maximum throughput on their
respective buses. To compare disk speeds go here
http://www.storagereview.com/comparison.html
You may be suprised to learn the relative speeds of each disk you
have.
Secondly , just because a disk is UDMA 5 or 6 will not necessarily
determine its relative speed. The site above runs apps on each
drive so their benchmarks do give a speed comparison.




--
Best Regards,
September 24, 2005 5:32:17 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus (More info?)

In article <MPG.1d9f102685915ecf989b79@news.giganews.com>, deus maximus
<senate@rome.ca> wrote:

>
> Keep in mind that the speed rates for the two drive types are not
> the speeds of the disks but only the maximum throughput on their
> respective buses. To compare disk speeds go here
> http://www.storagereview.com/comparison.html
> You may be suprised to learn the relative speeds of each disk you
> have.
> Secondly , just because a disk is UDMA 5 or 6 will not necessarily
> determine its relative speed. The site above runs apps on each
> drive so their benchmarks do give a speed comparison.

Another surprise for Martin, would be this in the ICH5 datasheet.
This is in the section describing the PATA interface (pg.183)

http://developer.intel.com/design/chipsets/datashts/252...

"reads at the maximum rate of 100 MB/s"
"write transfers at a maximum rate of 88.9 MB/s"

Inside a lot of the first SATA disk drives, there was a bridge
chip. In other words, they were still using the same PATA controller
chips as before, and to make a SATA interface, they just slapped
a chip onto the controller board, to bridge from SATA to PATA.
In fact, some of those bridges, only run at 100MB/sec.

There are all sorts of bottlenecks in the disk architecture,
and only benchmarking and looking at burst performance and
sustained transfer performance, will hint at exactly what you
got when you purchased your disks.

The best disks only sustain about 70MB/sec at the heads, so none
of these bottlenecks is really killing sustained transfer rate. Any
arguments here, are about burst-to-controller-cache performance.

Also, the seek time is an important parameter too. If looking
for files all over the disk, the answer only comes back, as
fast as the heads can be moved to the new area on the disk.
The biggest enabler there, is higher RPM rates, like 10K or
15K, instead of 7200 RPM. At 15K, SCSI is the answer.

Paul
!