Accidently deleted boot.ini.file

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Hi i unstalled a anti virus program from my computer, then
i went to restart my computer it said that i didnt have
c:\boot.ini.file
The problem is that i dont have my xp cd so i cant get it
from there!!!
So how can i get this file back??
9 answers Last reply
More about accidently deleted boot file
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    "Invalid Boot.ini" or "Windows could not start" error messages when you start your computer
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;330184&Product=winxp

    How to Replace Lost, Broken, or Missing Microsoft Software or Hardware
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;[ln];326246

    --
    Carey Frisch
    Microsoft MVP
    Windows XP - Shell/User

    Be Smart! Protect Your PC!
    http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/protect/default.aspx

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    "Neo" wrote:

    | Hi i unstalled a anti virus program from my computer, then
    | i went to restart my computer it said that i didnt have
    | c:\boot.ini.file
    | The problem is that i dont have my xp cd so i cant get it
    | from there!!!
    | So how can i get this file back??
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    BOOT.INI does not come from the XP CDROM. Rather, it is created when XP is
    installed. In theory it is "customized" to your installation of XP, but in
    practice most PCs have the same BOOT.INI file. The good news is that
    BOOT.INI is a small text file that can be created/modified in any editor.

    But, first, look for an older/backup copy that might be lying around the
    hard drive. It is probably called BOOT.BAK or similar. Rename it BOOT.INI
    and be sure that it is in the root of the C:\ drive, even if XP is not on
    that partition.

    If you can not find a older/backup copy, try taking one from another machine
    running the same verison of XP. Adjust the path to point to your
    installation of XP. As an example, here is my BOOT.INI, where XP is
    installed on C:\. Note that disk(0)partition(1) is C:\.

    [boot loader]

    timeout =15

    default = multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS

    [operating systems]

    multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS = "Microsoft Windows XP Home
    Edition" /fastdetect


    Other key files that must also be present on C:\ are NTLDR and NTDETECT.COM.

    As for how to see/change files on the hard drive without XP running, the
    best way would be to run the XP recovery console. For that you need an XP
    CDROM, any XP CDROM. Or, you can download the multiple-floppy disk set of
    files that is similar from Microsoft. See the following link:
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?kbid=310994

    If the disk is FAT32, you could also use a DOS boot floppy, such as from
    win98 or ME. Those are available at www.bootdisk.com. Be sure to get a
    copy of EDIT.COM, a simple DOS text editior, in case you need it.

    "Neo" <cotutaha@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:3f7c01c4a42e$08c84510$a601280a@phx.gbl...
    > Hi i unstalled a anti virus program from my computer, then
    > i went to restart my computer it said that i didnt have
    > c:\boot.ini.file
    > The problem is that i dont have my xp cd so i cant get it
    > from there!!!
    > So how can i get this file back??
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    >-----Original Message-----
    ><snip> As an example, here is my BOOT.INI, where XP is
    >installed on C:\. Note that disk(0)partition(1) is C:\.
    >
    More specifically, IIRC, disk(0) refers to the primary
    IDE port; disk(1) would be the secondary port
    and rdisk(0) refers to the master position on the cable
    while rdisk(1) would be the slave position

    Why those are 0-based and the partition is 1-based, I
    have no idea.

    >[boot loader]
    >
    >timeout =15
    >
    >default = multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
    >
    >[operating systems]
    >
    >multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS = "Microsoft
    Windows XP Home
    >Edition" /fastdetect
    >
    >
    >Other key files that must also be present on C:\ are
    NTLDR and NTDETECT.COM.
    >
    >As for how to see/change files on the hard drive without
    XP running, the
    >best way would be to run the XP recovery console. For
    that you need an XP
    >CDROM, any XP CDROM. Or, you can download the multiple-
    floppy disk set of
    >files that is similar from Microsoft. See the following
    link:
    >http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?kbid=310994
    >
    >If the disk is FAT32, you could also use a DOS boot
    floppy, such as from
    >win98 or ME. Those are available at www.bootdisk.com.
    Be sure to get a
    >copy of EDIT.COM, a simple DOS text editior, in case you
    need it.
    >
    >"Neo" <cotutaha@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    >news:3f7c01c4a42e$08c84510$a601280a@phx.gbl...
    >> Hi i unstalled a anti virus program from my computer,
    then
    >> i went to restart my computer it said that i didnt have
    >> c:\boot.ini.file
    >> The problem is that i dont have my xp cd so i cant get
    it
    >> from there!!!
    >> So how can i get this file back??
    >
    >
    >.
    >
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    "Michael Pardee" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:36b301c4a48b$c2e2a820$a401280a@phx.gbl...
    > >-----Original Message-----
    > ><snip> As an example, here is my BOOT.INI, where XP is
    > >installed on C:\. Note that disk(0)partition(1) is C:\.
    > >
    > More specifically, IIRC, disk(0) refers to the primary
    > IDE port; disk(1) would be the secondary port
    > and rdisk(0) refers to the master position on the cable
    > while rdisk(1) would be the slave position

    The 80-core IDE ribbon cable does NOT have a "master"
    or a "slave" position. Either plug can be used for a master
    or a slave disk. The distinction is made on the hard disk
    itself, by setting certain jumpers.
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    For the first time, the 80-conductor cable defines specific roles for each
    of the connectors on the cable; the older cable did not. Color coding of the
    connectors is used to make it easier to determine which connector goes with
    each device:
    Blue: The blue connector attaches to the host (motherboard or controller).
    Gray: The gray connector is in the middle of the cable, and goes to any
    slave (device 1) drive if present on the channel.
    Black: The black connector is at the opposite end from the host connector
    and goes to the master drive (device 0), or a single drive if only one is
    used.
    There are a couple of reasons why this coding was done. The main one: it is
    not a good idea to connect a single drive to the middle connector on a
    ribbon cable, because the "stub" of left-over, unconnected cable causes
    signaling problems. With Ultra DMA this "stub" connection is not just "not
    recommended", it is illegal: a single device must be at the end of the
    cable. The other reason is that since these cables support cable select
    inherently, the position of each drive on the cable matters if cable select
    is being used. With these two needs combined, it just made sense to design
    the cable so that drive positioning was explicitly clear.
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Minor correction to the posting Pegasus

    Drive Position: Unlike the old cables, with the 80-conductor cable, the
    master connector is at the end of the cable, and the slave is in the
    middle. As I explained above, this is a much more sensible arrangement,
    since a single drive placed at the end of the cable will be a master,
    and a second drive added in the middle a slave.

    quoted from
    http://www.pcguide.com/ref/hdd/if/ide/confCS-c.html


    Pegasus (MVP) wrote:

    > "Michael Pardee" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:36b301c4a48b$c2e2a820$a401280a@phx.gbl...
    >
    >>>-----Original Message-----
    >>><snip> As an example, here is my BOOT.INI, where XP is
    >>>installed on C:\. Note that disk(0)partition(1) is C:\.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>More specifically, IIRC, disk(0) refers to the primary
    >>IDE port; disk(1) would be the secondary port
    >>and rdisk(0) refers to the master position on the cable
    >>while rdisk(1) would be the slave position
    >>
    >
    > The 80-core IDE ribbon cable does NOT have a "master"
    > or a "slave" position. Either plug can be used for a master
    > or a slave disk. The distinction is made on the hard disk
    > itself, by setting certain jumpers.
    >
    >
    >
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Michael in his reply failed to mention it, and you only touch
    it in passing: Master/slave positions on the 80-core cable are
    only relevant in ***cable select*** mode. According to the
    link below, "cable select was never accepted in the industry".
    The vast majority of installations do not use "cable select",
    hence the connectors on the cable have no bias.
    http://www.pcguide.com/ref/hdd/if/ide/confCS-c.html


    "Jetro" <ik9480@spam.rogers.com> wrote in message
    news:O01e5iKpEHA.3728@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    > For the first time, the 80-conductor cable defines specific roles for each
    > of the connectors on the cable; the older cable did not. Color coding of
    the
    > connectors is used to make it easier to determine which connector goes
    with
    > each device:
    > Blue: The blue connector attaches to the host (motherboard or controller).
    > Gray: The gray connector is in the middle of the cable, and goes to any
    > slave (device 1) drive if present on the channel.
    > Black: The black connector is at the opposite end from the host connector
    > and goes to the master drive (device 0), or a single drive if only one is
    > used.
    > There are a couple of reasons why this coding was done. The main one: it
    is
    > not a good idea to connect a single drive to the middle connector on a
    > ribbon cable, because the "stub" of left-over, unconnected cable causes
    > signaling problems. With Ultra DMA this "stub" connection is not just "not
    > recommended", it is illegal: a single device must be at the end of the
    > cable. The other reason is that since these cables support cable select
    > inherently, the position of each drive on the cable matters if cable
    select
    > is being used. With these two needs combined, it just made sense to design
    > the cable so that drive positioning was explicitly clear.
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Master disk must be connected to the end of 80-wire cable. Regarding 40-wire
    cable, using the middle connector and leaving the end connector unattached
    is technically allowed but not recommended.
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