Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

K7S5A auto power up question

Last response: in Motherboards
Share
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
August 2, 2004 3:35:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.elitegroup (More info?)

hi guys, does anyone know how to auto power up without using the power
switch connected to the mainboard? i tried using different Bios versions
but cannot find one that suits this problem! is there something physically
that i can do to auto power this up instead of going thru bios
settings/versions?

again, to clarify, i just want to be able to totally power up the pc when
PSU is plugged in and not to have to use the power switch at all.

thanks for any help, i am sure this is an easy one for some people,
Kelly
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
August 2, 2004 5:22:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.elitegroup (More info?)

"Kelly Ray" <starwarsroomspam@comcast.net> writes:
>hi guys, does anyone know how to auto power up without using the power
>switch connected to the mainboard? i tried using different Bios versions
>but cannot find one that suits this problem! is there something physically
>that i can do to auto power this up instead of going thru bios
>settings/versions?

>again, to clarify, i just want to be able to totally power up the pc when
>PSU is plugged in and not to have to use the power switch at all.

>thanks for any help, i am sure this is an easy one for some people,
>Kelly

One alternative might be: I believe there is one pin on the ATX power
connector which if tied to ground will force the supply on when AC
power is provided. I'm pretty sure I read that somewhere but I can't
find it here at the moment. (And this might how the board turns the
supply on when you have things like "wake on LAN" enabled, pulling
that pin low, but I am less certain of that)
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
August 2, 2004 10:25:53 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.elitegroup (More info?)

"Kelly Ray" <starwarsroomspam@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:-7edneF6AcQLWZDcRVn-iA@comcast.com...
> hi guys, does anyone know how to auto power up without using the power
> switch connected to the mainboard? i tried using different Bios versions
> but cannot find one that suits this problem! is there something
physically
> that i can do to auto power this up instead of going thru bios
> settings/versions?
>
> again, to clarify, i just want to be able to totally power up the pc when
> PSU is plugged in and not to have to use the power switch at all.
>
> thanks for any help, i am sure this is an easy one for some people,


The technique of "hard-wiring power-on" is there and very easy. It is often
used when troubleshooting an ATX power supply all by itself, or testing a
motherboard out-of-case. Before I tell you how to do it, I should advise you
that the power switch is there not just for convenience (or inconvenience as
in your case). It is also there for protecting the electronics.

I can only guess why you might want to "hard-wire the switch to ON all the
time", but one scenario comes to mind: you want your computer to be ON
"twenty-four-seven" and to be automatically ON again after going OFF in a
power black-out. If this is the reason why you want to "hard-wiring it to
ON", I suggest that you don't. Instead, invest in something better and
SAFER: an UPS (uninterruptible power source) many of which, I believe, has
an option (via its software) of auto-restarting a machine once power
black-out is over. For more information on UPS, see, for example, the
following FAQ:

http://www.eits.uga.edu/~ucns/lans/docs/ups.html

(a bit outdated, but do a more extensive google search for a more updated
FAQ).

So, having said all that, unless you are knowledgeable in electronics and
electricity, you should NOT try the following:

**Warning: Do this at your own risk.**
First of all, shorting pin 14 (green wire, power-on) to
pin 16 (black wire, ground) of the ATX power
connector is equivalent to pushing the power button
once on the front panel of an ATX case.

Note: Most ATX power supplies, if not all, require an external load (such as
a CD ROM drive or a hard drive) to be connected before it would fully turn
on. Check out the following pages for details of the ATX power connector:
http://www.pcguide.com/ref/power/sup/partsMotherboard-c...

Second (which answers what you are asking), on the motherboard there is a
row (or two rows) of headers (usually called the "panel connector") for
connecting the power switch, HDD activity LEDs, speaker, etc. If you can
locate the two pins that connect to the power button on the front panel of
your computer case, then shorting those two pins will do the job. These two
pins are usually labeled (either by silkscreening onto the motherboard or in
the motherboard manual) as "POWER SW" or "POWER ON/OFF", or the like. You
may have to refer to the ECS motherboard manual to locate these two pins.

Do this at your own risk. Not recommended.

Al-U
Related resources
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
August 2, 2004 11:05:13 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.elitegroup (More info?)

"Don Taylor" <dont@agora.rdrop.com> wrote in message
news:_8GdnaYyoaAvQJDcRVn-qA@scnresearch.com...
> "Kelly Ray" <starwarsroomspam@comcast.net> writes:
> >hi guys, does anyone know how to auto power up without using the power
> >switch connected to the mainboard? i tried using different Bios versions
> >but cannot find one that suits this problem! is there something
physically
> >that i can do to auto power this up instead of going thru bios
> >settings/versions?
>
> >again, to clarify, i just want to be able to totally power up the pc when
> >PSU is plugged in and not to have to use the power switch at all.
>
> >thanks for any help, i am sure this is an easy one for some people,
> >Kelly
>
> One alternative might be: I believe there is one pin on the ATX power
> connector which if tied to ground will force the supply on when AC
> power is provided. I'm pretty sure I read that somewhere but I can't
> find it here at the moment. (And this might how the board turns the
> supply on when you have things like "wake on LAN" enabled, pulling
> that pin low, but I am less certain of that)

Even when "powered off", the "5V Standby" from an ATX power supply is what
enables the software to be in control of power on/off, or the computer to
"wake on ring", etc. For example, see the following pages:
http://www.pcguide.com/ref/power/sup/func_SoftPower.htm
http://www.pcguide.com/ref/power/sup/partsMotherboard-c...

Cheers,
Al-U
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
August 2, 2004 11:36:51 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.elitegroup (More info?)

ok, thanks for the replies!

i tried doing the short on the 2 "power on" pins but it shuts off again
after about 3 seconds, i guess because it is suppose to be a momentary
switch! it sounds like the first option(shorting wires 14 and 16) is the
easiest but do i do both options to make this work?

having said that, i would like to make sure exactly what i'm doing here!
do i cut those two wires from PSU and connect them, or can i just use a
"paper clip" on the connector on the motherboard and jump these two wires
without any cuts? will that be a momentary switch action and bypass "power
on" pins all together?

thanks for all the help,
Kelly




"alpha_uma" <no_one@nonesuch.com> wrote in message
news:R7lPc.159181$ek5.83855@pd7tw2no...
> "Kelly Ray" <starwarsroomspam@comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:-7edneF6AcQLWZDcRVn-iA@comcast.com...
> > hi guys, does anyone know how to auto power up without using the power
> > switch connected to the mainboard? i tried using different Bios
versions
> > but cannot find one that suits this problem! is there something
> physically
> > that i can do to auto power this up instead of going thru bios
> > settings/versions?
> >
> > again, to clarify, i just want to be able to totally power up the pc
when
> > PSU is plugged in and not to have to use the power switch at all.
> >
> > thanks for any help, i am sure this is an easy one for some people,
>
>
> The technique of "hard-wiring power-on" is there and very easy. It is
often
> used when troubleshooting an ATX power supply all by itself, or testing a
> motherboard out-of-case. Before I tell you how to do it, I should advise
you
> that the power switch is there not just for convenience (or inconvenience
as
> in your case). It is also there for protecting the electronics.
>
> I can only guess why you might want to "hard-wire the switch to ON all the
> time", but one scenario comes to mind: you want your computer to be ON
> "twenty-four-seven" and to be automatically ON again after going OFF in a
> power black-out. If this is the reason why you want to "hard-wiring it to
> ON", I suggest that you don't. Instead, invest in something better and
> SAFER: an UPS (uninterruptible power source) many of which, I believe, has
> an option (via its software) of auto-restarting a machine once power
> black-out is over. For more information on UPS, see, for example, the
> following FAQ:
>
> http://www.eits.uga.edu/~ucns/lans/docs/ups.html
>
> (a bit outdated, but do a more extensive google search for a more updated
> FAQ).
>
> So, having said all that, unless you are knowledgeable in electronics and
> electricity, you should NOT try the following:
>
> **Warning: Do this at your own risk.**
> First of all, shorting pin 14 (green wire, power-on) to
> pin 16 (black wire, ground) of the ATX power
> connector is equivalent to pushing the power button
> once on the front panel of an ATX case.
>
> Note: Most ATX power supplies, if not all, require an external load (such
as
> a CD ROM drive or a hard drive) to be connected before it would fully turn
> on. Check out the following pages for details of the ATX power connector:
> http://www.pcguide.com/ref/power/sup/partsMotherboard-c...
>
> Second (which answers what you are asking), on the motherboard there is a
> row (or two rows) of headers (usually called the "panel connector") for
> connecting the power switch, HDD activity LEDs, speaker, etc. If you can
> locate the two pins that connect to the power button on the front panel of
> your computer case, then shorting those two pins will do the job. These
two
> pins are usually labeled (either by silkscreening onto the motherboard or
in
> the motherboard manual) as "POWER SW" or "POWER ON/OFF", or the like. You
> may have to refer to the ECS motherboard manual to locate these two pins.
>
> Do this at your own risk. Not recommended.
>
> Al-U
>
>
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
August 2, 2004 5:17:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.elitegroup (More info?)

> i tried doing the short on the 2 "power on" pins but it shuts off again
> after about 3 seconds, i guess because it is suppose to be a momentary
> switch!

Yes, I did not explain it well in my last message about shorting those two
"power on" pins on the motherboard. You can only short it momentarily, and
then you have to release it right away to mimic the action of a momentary
switch.

> having said that, i would like to make sure exactly what i'm doing here!
> do i cut those two wires from PSU and connect them, or can i just use a
> "paper clip" on the connector on the motherboard and jump these two wires
> without any cuts? will that be a momentary switch action and bypass
"power
> on" pins all together?

No, do NOT cut those two wires from the PSU and connect them. Instead, the
paper-clip trick would work. By the way, there are several other "ground"
pins on the ATX power connector that you can use. Choose the one that is
most convenient. Remember, such "tricks" are meant for troubleshooting
purposes, and are NOT meant to be a permanent solution. You are really
risking your entire system if you attempt to set up your system permanently
like that.

Also, if you have a paper clip connecting those two pins on the ATX power
connector of the PSU, how would you still be able to plug the power
connector onto the motherboard?

Care to explain why you are doing this?
Al-U
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
August 2, 2004 8:46:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.elitegroup (More info?)

i would still have it connected to the motherboard but paper clip on top of
connector where the wires seed into it....just a jumper!

and i am using this pc as just a gaming device and did not want 2 seperate
power on switches!

thanks a lot for your help and i will try the paper clip thing tonight!

Kelly

"alpha_uma" <no_one@nonesuch.com> wrote in message
news:3arPc.160672$ek5.106885@pd7tw2no...
> > i tried doing the short on the 2 "power on" pins but it shuts off again
> > after about 3 seconds, i guess because it is suppose to be a momentary
> > switch!
>
> Yes, I did not explain it well in my last message about shorting those two
> "power on" pins on the motherboard. You can only short it momentarily, and
> then you have to release it right away to mimic the action of a momentary
> switch.
>
> > having said that, i would like to make sure exactly what i'm doing here!
> > do i cut those two wires from PSU and connect them, or can i just use a
> > "paper clip" on the connector on the motherboard and jump these two
wires
> > without any cuts? will that be a momentary switch action and bypass
> "power
> > on" pins all together?
>
> No, do NOT cut those two wires from the PSU and connect them. Instead, the
> paper-clip trick would work. By the way, there are several other "ground"
> pins on the ATX power connector that you can use. Choose the one that is
> most convenient. Remember, such "tricks" are meant for troubleshooting
> purposes, and are NOT meant to be a permanent solution. You are really
> risking your entire system if you attempt to set up your system
permanently
> like that.
>
> Also, if you have a paper clip connecting those two pins on the ATX power
> connector of the PSU, how would you still be able to plug the power
> connector onto the motherboard?
>
> Care to explain why you are doing this?
> Al-U
>
>
>
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
August 3, 2004 3:23:31 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.elitegroup (More info?)

"Kelly Ray" <starwarsroomspam@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:F5OdnRQmZZqqK5PcRVn-jQ@comcast.com...
> i would still have it connected to the motherboard but paper clip on top
of
> connector where the wires seed into it....just a jumper!
>
> and i am using this pc as just a gaming device and did not want 2 seperate
> power on switches!
>
> thanks a lot for your help and i will try the paper clip thing tonight!
>
> Kelly
>

Do you know that you are "playing with fire" with this kind of setup? If the
paper clip accidentally got loose and landed itself on the motherboard, it
can cause a short on something vital on the motherboard. At the very least,
it may ruin your motherboard. At the very worst, it may cause a fire hazard.

Think SAFETY, Kelly!

How much extra effort and time does it take to turn on a second switch? How
much are the lives of your loved ones worth to you?

> and i am using this pc as just a gaming device and did not want 2 seperate
> power on switches!
Please clarify the physical layout of your network. Do you have two or more
computers on your network? Are you saying that you want to flip one power
switch to turn on two (or more) computers on the network?

Al-U
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
August 3, 2004 3:23:32 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.elitegroup (More info?)

no network, one stand up arcade game and i would use a paper clip but solder
into the pins for a stable connection!

"alpha_uma" <no_one@nonesuch.com> wrote in message
news:T1APc.160404$od7.7784@pd7tw3no...
> "Kelly Ray" <starwarsroomspam@comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:F5OdnRQmZZqqK5PcRVn-jQ@comcast.com...
> > i would still have it connected to the motherboard but paper clip on top
> of
> > connector where the wires seed into it....just a jumper!
> >
> > and i am using this pc as just a gaming device and did not want 2
seperate
> > power on switches!
> >
> > thanks a lot for your help and i will try the paper clip thing tonight!
> >
> > Kelly
> >
>
> Do you know that you are "playing with fire" with this kind of setup? If
the
> paper clip accidentally got loose and landed itself on the motherboard, it
> can cause a short on something vital on the motherboard. At the very
least,
> it may ruin your motherboard. At the very worst, it may cause a fire
hazard.
>
> Think SAFETY, Kelly!
>
> How much extra effort and time does it take to turn on a second switch?
How
> much are the lives of your loved ones worth to you?
>
> > and i am using this pc as just a gaming device and did not want 2
seperate
> > power on switches!
> Please clarify the physical layout of your network. Do you have two or
more
> computers on your network? Are you saying that you want to flip one power
> switch to turn on two (or more) computers on the network?
>
> Al-U
>
>
>
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
August 3, 2004 5:34:18 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.elitegroup (More info?)

"Kelly Ray" <starwarsroomspam@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:ILmdnXDQqO3xS5PcRVn-tQ@comcast.com...
> no network, one stand up arcade game and i would use a paper clip but
solder
> into the pins for a stable connection!
>

The following pages would either scare you off or give you even more crazy
ideas:

http://www.overclockers.com/tips1139/

If you insist on using a MacGyver-style fix as a permanent solution, make
sure you can live with the consequences if things go wrong. A little
knowledge is a dangerous thing. In the world of amateur electronics,
Murphy's law often has the final words.
Al-U

******************************************
O'Neill: What's "overclocking"?
Nox: The very young do not always do as they are told.
******************************************
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
August 3, 2004 11:41:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.elitegroup (More info?)

On Sun, 1 Aug 2004 23:35:42 -0500, "Kelly Ray"
<starwarsroomspam@comcast.net> wrote:

>hi guys, does anyone know how to auto power up without using the power
>switch connected to the mainboard? i tried using different Bios versions
>but cannot find one that suits this problem! is there something physically
>that i can do to auto power this up instead of going thru bios
>settings/versions?
>
>again, to clarify, i just want to be able to totally power up the pc when
>PSU is plugged in and not to have to use the power switch at all.
>
>thanks for any help, i am sure this is an easy one for some people,
>Kelly
>

I would suggest you get a 12 volt relay from the autoparts store and
wire the relay coil to a power connector coming from the power supply
so that the relay is energized any time the power is on. Then
parallel the case power line across the NC terminals of the relay.
When power is lost, the relay will close and activate the power on
function.

PJ
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
September 14, 2004 12:29:53 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.elitegroup (More info?)

Hi! Just going through some older messages and hope you have found a
solution to your problem. If not, put a small non-polarized
electrolyic capacitor across the power switch terminals; I've used
values from 1mf to 100mf, but be sure the voltage rating is at least 5
vdc.

If your electronically adept use a voltmeter and see which pin is more
positive than the other. Then you can use a polarized capacitor, and
save a little money.

Large value capacitors will take a long time to charge and can turn
the system back off....its like holdiing iin the power button. I've
seen it happen on my boards when cap values get in the 500 mf range,
but it is probably mainboard dependent.

Smaller value capacitors will restart the system almost instantly if
power is reapplied quickly, while a larger value cap needs longer to
discharge. If the power comes back on before the capacitor
discharges, the system will have to be restarted manually. But that
could be a good thing if the power is going up and down like a yo-yo.

Jim


On Sun, 1 Aug 2004 23:35:42 -0500, "Kelly Ray"
<starwarsroomspam@comcast.net> wrote:

>hi guys, does anyone know how to auto power up without using the power
>switch connected to the mainboard? i tried using different Bios versions
>but cannot find one that suits this problem! is there something physically
>that i can do to auto power this up instead of going thru bios
>settings/versions?
>
>again, to clarify, i just want to be able to totally power up the pc when
>PSU is plugged in and not to have to use the power switch at all.
>
>thanks for any help, i am sure this is an easy one for some people,
>Kelly
>
>
September 14, 2004 12:50:53 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.elitegroup (More info?)

Download and flash the HoneyX BIOS for this board. It allows you to
do this in the BIOS configurabion screen. I did it for my server so
after a power outage the box will automatically turn on.

Bill


"Kelly Ray" <starwarsroomspam@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:-7edneF6AcQLWZDcRVn-iA@comcast.com...
> hi guys, does anyone know how to auto power up without using the power
> switch connected to the mainboard? i tried using different Bios versions
> but cannot find one that suits this problem! is there something
physically
> that i can do to auto power this up instead of going thru bios
> settings/versions?
>
> again, to clarify, i just want to be able to totally power up the pc when
> PSU is plugged in and not to have to use the power switch at all.
>
> thanks for any help, i am sure this is an easy one for some people,
> Kelly
>
>
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
September 15, 2004 11:00:57 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.elitegroup (More info?)

Bill wrote:
> Download and flash the HoneyX BIOS for this board. It allows you to
> do this in the BIOS configurabion screen. I did it for my server so
> after a power outage the box will automatically turn on.
>
> Bill

An alternate route is to set a power-on password of just 'spacebar'.
This works without the HoneyX BIOS as well (though I do use it).
!