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AMD's so-called "Cool n' Quiet" feature

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Anonymous
October 3, 2004 12:40:18 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Inside my PC is an Athlon 64 3000+ processor, with stock heatsink/fan.
There's also a Radeon 9800 Pro in there. If the computer is idle or
if there's only a light workload (ie internet surfing), the CPU
temperature is around 45 degrees. When there's a heavy workload (ie
games, number crunching, etc), it's often around the late 50s and
sometimes it even reaches the early 60s. Is that temperature range
too hot, or is it normal? Am I better off activating, or
deactivating, the "Cool n' Quiet" feature?

In addition to the CPU and power supply fan, I have two additional
fans inside the case to circulate air. To get the best air
circulation possible, how should all these fans be arranged?

Right now, I have the CPU fan blowing air into the CPU's heatsink.
There's another fan on the side panel, blowing air *out* from the
case. The third fan is below the power supply, blowing air *into* the
case. It sounds good on paper, but the temperature inside the case
seems a little high.
October 3, 2004 4:20:24 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I do not have that motherboard, but
on my regular Athlon (32 bit) board, cpu temperature
is presently at 45 degrees, without anything running.
Q-Fan is enabled in the BIOS. It would be cooler
if I disabled it, but it would be a bit more noisy.

It is no cause for worry, since the CPU can go as
I as 95° according to specs.


"Opticreep" <opticreep@yahoo.com> a écrit dans le message de news:
9e1f277e.0410030740.7751b440@posting.google.com...
> Inside my PC is an Athlon 64 3000+ processor, with stock heatsink/fan.
> There's also a Radeon 9800 Pro in there. If the computer is idle or
> if there's only a light workload (ie internet surfing), the CPU
> temperature is around 45 degrees. When there's a heavy workload (ie
> games, number crunching, etc), it's often around the late 50s and
> sometimes it even reaches the early 60s. Is that temperature range
> too hot, or is it normal? Am I better off activating, or
> deactivating, the "Cool n' Quiet" feature?
>
> In addition to the CPU and power supply fan, I have two additional
> fans inside the case to circulate air. To get the best air
> circulation possible, how should all these fans be arranged?
>
> Right now, I have the CPU fan blowing air into the CPU's heatsink.
> There's another fan on the side panel, blowing air *out* from the
> case. The third fan is below the power supply, blowing air *into* the
> case. It sounds good on paper, but the temperature inside the case
> seems a little high.
Anonymous
October 3, 2004 4:20:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

If your computer foes into the 90's (C) then it will be toast. 72 -74
degrees Celsius is the max for AMD64 procs.

Not all HSF are compatible with Cool n' Quiet. Are you running ASUSprobe to
monitor conditions?

I would suspect that the thermal pad/paste was improperly applied when the
HSF and cooler were added. My CPU (AMD64 3200+) runs 34 at idle and 39-40
at full load.

Bobby

"GF" <nono@nowhere.ca> wrote in message
news:HEV7d.11105$247.206114@wagner.videotron.net...
>I do not have that motherboard, but
> on my regular Athlon (32 bit) board, cpu temperature
> is presently at 45 degrees, without anything running.
> Q-Fan is enabled in the BIOS. It would be cooler
> if I disabled it, but it would be a bit more noisy.
>
> It is no cause for worry, since the CPU can go as
> I as 95° according to specs.
>
>
> "Opticreep" <opticreep@yahoo.com> a écrit dans le message de news:
> 9e1f277e.0410030740.7751b440@posting.google.com...
>> Inside my PC is an Athlon 64 3000+ processor, with stock heatsink/fan.
>> There's also a Radeon 9800 Pro in there. If the computer is idle or
>> if there's only a light workload (ie internet surfing), the CPU
>> temperature is around 45 degrees. When there's a heavy workload (ie
>> games, number crunching, etc), it's often around the late 50s and
>> sometimes it even reaches the early 60s. Is that temperature range
>> too hot, or is it normal? Am I better off activating, or
>> deactivating, the "Cool n' Quiet" feature?
>>
>> In addition to the CPU and power supply fan, I have two additional
>> fans inside the case to circulate air. To get the best air
>> circulation possible, how should all these fans be arranged?
>>
>> Right now, I have the CPU fan blowing air into the CPU's heatsink.
>> There's another fan on the side panel, blowing air *out* from the
>> case. The third fan is below the power supply, blowing air *into* the
>> case. It sounds good on paper, but the temperature inside the case
>> seems a little high.
>
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
October 3, 2004 4:52:37 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

These temps are not out of hand and are quite normal.
Here is the Thermal & Electrical Chart for AMD
http://www.amd.com/gb-uk/assets/content_type/Downloadab...

DO NOT open the case and stick your finger on the heatsink, this sounds like
something a 2 year old would do, possible electric shock to you &/or static
electricity damage to your equipment.

--
Good Day
River_Rat




"Opticreep" <opticreep@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:9e1f277e.0410030740.7751b440@posting.google.com...
Inside my PC is an Athlon 64 3000+ processor, with stock heatsink/fan.
There's also a Radeon 9800 Pro in there. If the computer is idle or
if there's only a light workload (ie internet surfing), the CPU
temperature is around 45 degrees. When there's a heavy workload (ie
games, number crunching, etc), it's often around the late 50s and
sometimes it even reaches the early 60s. Is that temperature range
too hot, or is it normal? Am I better off activating, or
deactivating, the "Cool n' Quiet" feature?

In addition to the CPU and power supply fan, I have two additional
fans inside the case to circulate air. To get the best air
circulation possible, how should all these fans be arranged?

Right now, I have the CPU fan blowing air into the CPU's heatsink.
There's another fan on the side panel, blowing air *out* from the
case. The third fan is below the power supply, blowing air *into* the
case. It sounds good on paper, but the temperature inside the case
seems a little high.
Anonymous
October 3, 2004 6:33:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Draw cool air into the front of the case (away from heat producing
components and fan exhausts). Blow hot air out of the rear of the case
(where the power supply is already exhausting to).

If you try to draw "cool" air in from the back you will invariably be
drawing the hot exhausted air from the power supply back into the case!

--

Regards:

Richard Urban

aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)


"Opticreep" <opticreep@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:9e1f277e.0410030740.7751b440@posting.google.com...
> Inside my PC is an Athlon 64 3000+ processor, with stock heatsink/fan.
> There's also a Radeon 9800 Pro in there. If the computer is idle or
> if there's only a light workload (ie internet surfing), the CPU
> temperature is around 45 degrees. When there's a heavy workload (ie
> games, number crunching, etc), it's often around the late 50s and
> sometimes it even reaches the early 60s. Is that temperature range
> too hot, or is it normal? Am I better off activating, or
> deactivating, the "Cool n' Quiet" feature?
>
> In addition to the CPU and power supply fan, I have two additional
> fans inside the case to circulate air. To get the best air
> circulation possible, how should all these fans be arranged?
>
> Right now, I have the CPU fan blowing air into the CPU's heatsink.
> There's another fan on the side panel, blowing air *out* from the
> case. The third fan is below the power supply, blowing air *into* the
> case. It sounds good on paper, but the temperature inside the case
> seems a little high.
Anonymous
October 3, 2004 9:09:42 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Opticreep" <opticreep@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:9e1f277e.0410030740.7751b440@posting.google.com...
> Inside my PC is an Athlon 64 3000+ processor, with stock heatsink/fan.
> There's also a Radeon 9800 Pro in there. If the computer is idle or
> if there's only a light workload (ie internet surfing), the CPU
> temperature is around 45 degrees. When there's a heavy workload (ie
> games, number crunching, etc), it's often around the late 50s and
> sometimes it even reaches the early 60s. Is that temperature range
> too hot, or is it normal? Am I better off activating, or
> deactivating, the "Cool n' Quiet" feature?
>
> In addition to the CPU and power supply fan, I have two additional
> fans inside the case to circulate air. To get the best air
> circulation possible, how should all these fans be arranged?
>
> Right now, I have the CPU fan blowing air into the CPU's heatsink.
> There's another fan on the side panel, blowing air *out* from the
> case. The third fan is below the power supply, blowing air *into* the
> case. It sounds good on paper, but the temperature inside the case
> seems a little high.

If you would turn both of those case fans around and check your temps again,
I think you would be pleasantly surprised. In other words fan on side panel
blowing in and the fan below the power supply blowing out. Heat rises. Why
fight Mother Nature?

PWY
Anonymous
October 3, 2004 9:09:43 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

There is no need to switch any fans around for the heat will only rise in an
environment where there is no circulation.
As long as you are churning the air inside your PC, and an exhaust fan to
reduce pressure build-up and allow the intake fans to pull more cool air
from the outside.

--
Good Day
River_Rat




"PWY" <pyork22@*mail.com> wrote in message
news:qnW7d.51849$ci3.2309967@twister.southeast.rr.com...

"Opticreep" <opticreep@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:9e1f277e.0410030740.7751b440@posting.google.com...
> Inside my PC is an Athlon 64 3000+ processor, with stock heatsink/fan.
> There's also a Radeon 9800 Pro in there. If the computer is idle or
> if there's only a light workload (ie internet surfing), the CPU
> temperature is around 45 degrees. When there's a heavy workload (ie
> games, number crunching, etc), it's often around the late 50s and
> sometimes it even reaches the early 60s. Is that temperature range
> too hot, or is it normal? Am I better off activating, or
> deactivating, the "Cool n' Quiet" feature?
>
> In addition to the CPU and power supply fan, I have two additional
> fans inside the case to circulate air. To get the best air
> circulation possible, how should all these fans be arranged?
>
> Right now, I have the CPU fan blowing air into the CPU's heatsink.
> There's another fan on the side panel, blowing air *out* from the
> case. The third fan is below the power supply, blowing air *into* the
> case. It sounds good on paper, but the temperature inside the case
> seems a little high.

If you would turn both of those case fans around and check your temps again,
I think you would be pleasantly surprised. In other words fan on side panel
blowing in and the fan below the power supply blowing out. Heat rises. Why
fight Mother Nature?

PWY
Anonymous
October 3, 2004 11:29:21 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

> Right now, I have the CPU fan blowing air into the CPU's heatsink.
> There's another fan on the side panel, blowing air *out* from the
> case. The third fan is below the power supply, blowing air *into* the
> case. It sounds good on paper, but the temperature inside the case
> seems a little high.

I don't know if you've been reading my thread, but I discovered
that it isn't a good idea to have a case fan mounted directly
below the PSU that is blowing air into the case. It recycles the
warm air blowing out from the PSU. If your fan is a lot lower down
on the back of the case, this might not apply to your setup.

Your temperatures seem a bit too hot to me. I wouldn't want them
that hot, anyway. Your running temperature is 45, whereas mine is
42. We've got similar CPUs and video cards (mine's 3200, yours is
3000; mine's 9600, yours is 9800). Running temperature doesn't
matter, but I wouldn't want my temperature under full load to be
over 60 C. The threshold for our CPUs is 70 C.

By the way, I tried Cool 'n Quiet, but uninstalled it. It didn't
do anything at all that I could see, and I don't really like the
idea of it reducing the speed of my CPU when it isn't necessary to
reduce it, just to save power -- I'm not worried about how much
electricity the computer is using, I'm only worried about heat and
noise, which (in spite of its name) Cool 'n Quiet doesn't seem to
do anything about.
Anonymous
October 3, 2004 11:30:49 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"River_Rat" <youknow@Iwillslapyou> wrote in message
news:10m0f2j89tr84d3@corp.supernews.com...

> DO NOT open the case and stick your finger on the heatsink, this
> sounds like
> something a 2 year old would do, possible electric shock to you &/or
> static
> electricity damage to your equipment.

Although it is widely regarded among the PC modding community to be
the best way of determining if a cooling solution is performing and
there is only a risk of electric shock if your system has been wired
incorrectly in which case it probably wouldn't work in the first
place. As for static you would discharge yourself while removing the
case cover.
Anonymous
October 3, 2004 11:33:09 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

> As for static you would discharge yourself while removing the
> case cover.

LOL. That could be messy. (sorry, couldn't resist)
Anonymous
October 4, 2004 4:35:55 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

On 3 Oct 2004 08:40:18 -0700 There I was minding my own business and
then opticreep@yahoo.com (Opticreep) wrote :

>Inside my PC is an Athlon 64 3000+ processor, with stock heatsink/fan.
> There's also a Radeon 9800 Pro in there. If the computer is idle or
>if there's only a light workload (ie internet surfing), the CPU
>temperature is around 45 degrees. When there's a heavy workload (ie
>games, number crunching, etc), it's often around the late 50s and
>sometimes it even reaches the early 60s. Is that temperature range
>too hot, or is it normal? Am I better off activating, or
>deactivating, the "Cool n' Quiet" feature?
>
>In addition to the CPU and power supply fan, I have two additional
>fans inside the case to circulate air. To get the best air
>circulation possible, how should all these fans be arranged?
>
>Right now, I have the CPU fan blowing air into the CPU's heatsink.
>There's another fan on the side panel, blowing air *out* from the
>case. The third fan is below the power supply, blowing air *into* the
>case. It sounds good on paper, but the temperature inside the case
>seems a little high.

You are running a little warm but well within spec.Ambient room temps
affect cooling as does the position of the system e.g if the back is
too close to a wall if you are using a back case fan.Also
messy/incorrectly located wires inside can affect cooling.
I use 1 80mm back case fan blowing out and this cooler(Bargain of the
year IMHO as it also comes with it's own tube of Silver Thermal
paste),
http://www.cclcomputers.biz/acatalog/coolersA370.htm
http://tinyurl.com/ybtn
MicroFlow2 SPA07B2 (Skt A) Ref: CLR0006
0
more details

Online Price £6.48£7.61 Including VAT at 17.5%

My temps in Summer rarely go above 50 Deg C under very long and heavy
game usage.
Case temp ATM 29 Deg C
CPU 43 Deg C
HTH :) 




--
Free Windows/PC help,
http://www.geocities.com/sheppola/trouble.html
remove obvious to reply
email shep@obviouspartyheld.de
Free songs to download and,"BURN" :o )
http://www.soundclick.com/bands/8/nomessiahsmusic.htm
Anonymous
October 4, 2004 5:39:57 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Opticreep wrote:
> Inside my PC is an Athlon 64 3000+ processor, with stock heatsink/fan.
> There's also a Radeon 9800 Pro in there. If the computer is idle or
> if there's only a light workload (ie internet surfing), the CPU
> temperature is around 45 degrees. When there's a heavy workload (ie
> games, number crunching, etc), it's often around the late 50s and
> sometimes it even reaches the early 60s. Is that temperature range
> too hot, or is it normal?

That's normal.

> Am I better off activating, or
> deactivating, the "Cool n' Quiet" feature?
>
> In addition to the CPU and power supply fan, I have two additional
> fans inside the case to circulate air. To get the best air
> circulation possible, how should all these fans be arranged?
>
> Right now, I have the CPU fan blowing air into the CPU's heatsink.

Of course.

> There's another fan on the side panel, blowing air *out* from the
> case.

Try reversing that, or even disconnecting it for a bit while you test
out the suggestion below:

> The third fan is below the power supply, blowing air *into* the
> case.

Nah, that just screws up the airflow. You want the airflow to come in
from the front (whether there's a fan or not at the front doesn't
matter) and flow up over the drives and CPU and exhaust out the rear of
the case. The power supply fan is a part of this, but with a fan beneath
it blowing air back in you're defeating it. Turn that fan around so that
it's blowing the air OUT of the case.

> It sounds good on paper, but the temperature inside the case
> seems a little high.

You've given CPU temps not system temps, unless I missed something...?


--
spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo
Anonymous
October 4, 2004 10:10:56 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

> If your computer goes into the 90's (C) then it will be toast. 72 -74
> degrees Celsius is the max for AMD64 procs.

True for Athlon 64s, but not for all older AMD chips. One I looked
at was rated at a threshold temperature of 95 C. The guy wrote:

> on my regular Athlon (32 bit) board, cpu temperature
>> is presently at 45 degrees, without anything running.
>> Q-Fan is enabled in the BIOS. It would be cooler
>> if I disabled it, but it would be a bit more noisy.
>>
>> It is no cause for worry, since the CPU can go as
>> high as 95° according to specs.

If he's using a 32-bit board, he must have an older CPU than a 64.
Probably the one that's rated up to 95 C.
Anonymous
October 4, 2004 1:49:56 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

> There's also a Radeon 9800 Pro in there. If the computer is idle or
> if there's only a light workload (ie internet surfing), the CPU
> temperature is around 45 degrees. When there's a heavy workload (ie
> games, number crunching, etc), it's often around the late 50s and
> sometimes it even reaches the early 60s.

I have my sn85g4v2 bios set to "quiet" operation mode and my CPU gets to 65C
under heavy load. Causes no problems -
100% stable with CPU overclocked (Athlon64 3200+ @2420Mhz) running Prime95
for two days.

> Am I better off activating, or
> deactivating, the "Cool n' Quiet" feature?

I recommend it. It reduces my idle CPU temperature from 50 to 35C - which in
turn allows even quiter operation (I can even stop the heatpipe fan). Impact
on performance is negligible - less than 0.5%.

Mirek
Anonymous
October 4, 2004 5:03:52 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

On Mon, 04 Oct 2004 06:10:56 GMT, Al Smith <invalid@address.com>
wrote:

>> If your computer goes into the 90's (C) then it will be toast. 72 -74
>> degrees Celsius is the max for AMD64 procs.
>
>True for Athlon 64s, but not for all older AMD chips. One I looked
>at was rated at a threshold temperature of 95 C. The guy wrote:
>
>> on my regular Athlon (32 bit) board, cpu temperature
>>> is presently at 45 degrees, without anything running.
>>> Q-Fan is enabled in the BIOS. It would be cooler
>>> if I disabled it, but it would be a bit more noisy.
>>>
>>> It is no cause for worry, since the CPU can go as
>>> high as 95° according to specs.
>
>If he's using a 32-bit board, he must have an older CPU than a 64.
>Probably the one that's rated up to 95 C.


It depends where you're measuring the temperature. Athlon's specs are
for _die_ temperature - i.e. the temperature measured _inside_ the
chip itself. The "CPU Diode" temperatures reported via suitable
software by the latest Athlon processors may correspond to that
(no-one seems to be quite convinced of this) but the typical "CPU
Temperature" returned by motherboard sensors located immediately
underneath the CPU socket certainly doesn't - basic Physics says that
this value, even if correctly measured and reported, is likely to be
significantly lower than the die temperature. There seems to be a
reasonable consensus that Athlons will run happily at CPU temperatures
(measured by a sensor under the socket) up to the mid 50s. Most people
would feel that a measured temperature of 60 was too hot and 70 was
asking for trouble (and likely to get it in short order).

Please respond to the Newsgroup, so that others may benefit from the exchange.
Peter R. Fletcher
!