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Cancellation

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July 5, 2004 11:04:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

I had Cingular for 1.5 years before I went to College an hour away from my home
town. In order to not get charged for roaming, I had to switch to their GAIT
plan. Ever since I have had VERY VERY poor reception, my phone often does not
work, I lose a lot of calls and I get weird charges on my bill. Their CS only
blows me off and does not want to help.

Because of switching to the new plan, I signed another 2 year agreement to
avoid paying a $200 cell phone bill. I WANT OUT!!

Is there any way to cancel Cingular service without paying the horrid $150
cancellation fee??

Megan

More about : cancellation

Anonymous
July 6, 2004 4:35:27 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

I think you'll come to the conclusion to pay the $150 ETF than the remaining
monthly payments. There literally is no way to get out of the ETF.

Chris

"HiL" <hilarios@aol.comRARnospm> wrote in message
news:20040705150458.04622.00000839@mb-m10.aol.com...
>I had Cingular for 1.5 years before I went to College an hour away from my
>home
> town. In order to not get charged for roaming, I had to switch to their
> GAIT
> plan. Ever since I have had VERY VERY poor reception, my phone often does
> not
> work, I lose a lot of calls and I get weird charges on my bill. Their CS
> only
> blows me off and does not want to help.
>
> Because of switching to the new plan, I signed another 2 year agreement to
> avoid paying a $200 cell phone bill. I WANT OUT!!
>
> Is there any way to cancel Cingular service without paying the horrid
> $150
> cancellation fee??
>
> Megan
Anonymous
July 6, 2004 4:35:28 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

In article <jtmGc.1788$X84.902@newssvr33.news.prodigy.com>,
"Chris Russell" <noone@nowhere.nospam> wrote:

> I think you'll come to the conclusion to pay the $150 ETF than the remaining
> monthly payments. There literally is no way to get out of the ETF.

Just don't pay it, and go about your business.

If you think anyone cares about a credit report debt from a cell phone
company, you're mistaken. Everyone knows the cell phone companies have
no idea what you really owe them; every bill is at best an
approximation, and all too frequently they just throw out a random
number and expect you to pay. Those who are paying attention don't pay
those random bills. It may or may not be reported to the credit
agencies.

Cell phone companies are scum.
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Anonymous
July 6, 2004 11:19:30 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

"HiL" <hilarios@aol.comRARnospm> wrote in message
news:20040705150458.04622.00000839@mb-m10.aol.com...
> I had Cingular for 1.5 years before I went to College an hour away from my
home
> town. In order to not get charged for roaming, I had to switch to their
GAIT
> plan. Ever since I have had VERY VERY poor reception, my phone often does
not
> work, I lose a lot of calls and I get weird charges on my bill. Their CS
only
> blows me off and does not want to help.
>
> Because of switching to the new plan, I signed another 2 year agreement to
> avoid paying a $200 cell phone bill. I WANT OUT!!
>
> Is there any way to cancel Cingular service without paying the horrid
$150
> cancellation fee??
>
So what you are saying is, you have your
new $200.00 phone, but you don't want to
pay $150.00 to keep it without your service?

Funny
Anonymous
July 6, 2004 2:44:18 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

In article <20040705150458.04622.00000839@mb-m10.aol.com>,
hilarios@aol.comRARnospm (HiL) wrote:

> I had Cingular for 1.5 years before I went to College an hour away from my
> home
> town. In order to not get charged for roaming, I had to switch to their GAIT
> plan. Ever since I have had VERY VERY poor reception, my phone often does not
> work, I lose a lot of calls and I get weird charges on my bill. Their CS only
> blows me off and does not want to help.
>
> Because of switching to the new plan, I signed another 2 year agreement to
> avoid paying a $200 cell phone bill. I WANT OUT!!
>
> Is there any way to cancel Cingular service without paying the horrid $150
> cancellation fee??

The simple basic legal principle of "Fit for purpose" applies. If they
sell you a phone you are supposed to be able to use it. If your service
is truly so bad you can not use it, Write to your State's Attorney
General with a certified copy to Cingular HQ in Atlanta asking to be let
out of the contract.
Anonymous
July 6, 2004 2:46:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

In article <elmop-A25F8D.23321605072004@text.usenetserver.com>,
"Elmo P. Shagnasty" <elmop@nastydesigns.com> wrote:

> In article <jtmGc.1788$X84.902@newssvr33.news.prodigy.com>,
> "Chris Russell" <noone@nowhere.nospam> wrote:
>
> > I think you'll come to the conclusion to pay the $150 ETF than the
> > remaining
> > monthly payments. There literally is no way to get out of the ETF.
>
> Just don't pay it, and go about your business.
>
> If you think anyone cares about a credit report debt from a cell phone
> company, you're mistaken. Everyone knows the cell phone companies have
> no idea what you really owe them; every bill is at best an
> approximation, and all too frequently they just throw out a random
> number and expect you to pay. Those who are paying attention don't pay
> those random bills. It may or may not be reported to the credit
> agencies.
>
> Cell phone companies are scum.

In National Surveys, Cellular Carriers are rated just above Cable TV
companies at the bottom of the scale for how consumers view them.
July 6, 2004 11:24:19 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

Verizon cancelled my contract for me by asking.

The coverage changed dramatically, I found out they lost the lease on the
tower near my home. I wrote them a letter explaining the service worked
when I bought the phone, but no longer works.

They cancelled the contract as I requested.

JQP

"HiL" <hilarios@aol.comRARnospm> wrote in message
news:20040705150458.04622.00000839@mb-m10.aol.com...
> I had Cingular for 1.5 years before I went to College an hour away from my
home
> town. In order to not get charged for roaming, I had to switch to their
GAIT
> plan. Ever since I have had VERY VERY poor reception, my phone often does
not
> work, I lose a lot of calls and I get weird charges on my bill. Their CS
only
> blows me off and does not want to help.
>
> Because of switching to the new plan, I signed another 2 year agreement to
> avoid paying a $200 cell phone bill. I WANT OUT!!
>
> Is there any way to cancel Cingular service without paying the horrid
$150
> cancellation fee??
>
> Megan
Anonymous
July 7, 2004 2:02:32 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

"JQP" <junk@no-spam.paulsel.com> wrote in message
news:EpGGc.13843$9t6.6574@bignews3.bellsouth.net...
| Verizon cancelled my contract for me by asking.
|
| The coverage changed dramatically, I found out they lost the lease on the
| tower near my home. I wrote them a letter explaining the service worked
| when I bought the phone, but no longer works.
|
| They cancelled the contract as I requested.
|

When they change something that alters your service, they are required by
law to allow you out of the contract.
Anonymous
July 7, 2004 6:22:24 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

In article <4OIGc.9067$285.3333@bignews6.bellsouth.net>,
"Jason Cothran" <reply@board.nomail> wrote:

>
> "JQP" <junk@no-spam.paulsel.com> wrote in message
> news:EpGGc.13843$9t6.6574@bignews3.bellsouth.net...
> | Verizon cancelled my contract for me by asking.
> |
> | The coverage changed dramatically, I found out they lost the lease on the
> | tower near my home. I wrote them a letter explaining the service worked
> | when I bought the phone, but no longer works.
> |
> | They cancelled the contract as I requested.
> |
>
> When they change something that alters your service, they are required by
> law to allow you out of the contract.

But other carriers are not so quick to assist, and instead will point to
unenforceable fine print in the contract.
Anonymous
July 7, 2004 5:02:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

Sorry, there is no such law in the state of Michigan. Here the terms of
service govern the service. Your contract is a binding document, if you
want to fight be prepared to pay for an attorney and big $$$.

Chris

"Jason Cothran" <reply@board.nomail> wrote in message
news:4OIGc.9067$285.3333@bignews6.bellsouth.net...
>
> "JQP" <junk@no-spam.paulsel.com> wrote in message
> news:EpGGc.13843$9t6.6574@bignews3.bellsouth.net...
> | Verizon cancelled my contract for me by asking.
> |
> | The coverage changed dramatically, I found out they lost the lease on
> the
> | tower near my home. I wrote them a letter explaining the service worked
> | when I bought the phone, but no longer works.
> |
> | They cancelled the contract as I requested.
> |
>
> When they change something that alters your service, they are required by
> law to allow you out of the contract.
>
>
Anonymous
July 7, 2004 5:02:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

"Chris Russell" <noone@nowhere.nospam> wrote in message
news:jvSGc.2292$sa1.2198@newssvr17.news.prodigy.com...
| Sorry, there is no such law in the state of Michigan. Here the terms of
| service govern the service. Your contract is a binding document, if you
| want to fight be prepared to pay for an attorney and big $$$.
|

It is federal. If Verizon breaks their end of the contract, you are allowed
out of the contract. No wireless company would be stupid enough to fight a
clear breach on their part.
Anonymous
July 7, 2004 10:50:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

"Jason Cothran" <reply@board.nomail> wrote in message
news:G9UGc.16039$9t6.10589@bignews3.bellsouth.net...
>
> "Chris Russell" <noone@nowhere.nospam> wrote in message
> news:jvSGc.2292$sa1.2198@newssvr17.news.prodigy.com...
> | Sorry, there is no such law in the state of Michigan. Here the terms of
> | service govern the service. Your contract is a binding document, if you
> | want to fight be prepared to pay for an attorney and big $$$.
> |
>
> It is federal. If Verizon breaks their end of the contract, you are
allowed
> out of the contract. No wireless company would be stupid enough to fight a
> clear breach on their part.
>
>

But in order for it to be actionable, it would have to be something
specifically mentioned in the contract. If you look, you'll notice that
there are no specific guarantees of coverage or service.
Anonymous
July 8, 2004 1:11:29 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

"Scott Stephenson" <scott.stephensonson@adelphia.net> wrote in message
news:XpqdnZn8-Iq3B3Hd4p2dnA@adelphia.com...
|
| "Jason Cothran" <reply@board.nomail> wrote in message
| news:G9UGc.16039$9t6.10589@bignews3.bellsouth.net...
| >
| > "Chris Russell" <noone@nowhere.nospam> wrote in message
| > news:jvSGc.2292$sa1.2198@newssvr17.news.prodigy.com...
| > | Sorry, there is no such law in the state of Michigan. Here the terms
of
| > | service govern the service. Your contract is a binding document, if
you
| > | want to fight be prepared to pay for an attorney and big $$$.
| > |
| >
| > It is federal. If Verizon breaks their end of the contract, you are
| allowed
| > out of the contract. No wireless company would be stupid enough to fight
a
| > clear breach on their part.
| >
| >
|
| But in order for it to be actionable, it would have to be something
| specifically mentioned in the contract. If you look, you'll notice that
| there are no specific guarantees of coverage or service.
|

No but they cannot, by law, hold you to your contract if they change
something to worsen your service.
July 8, 2004 6:31:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

On Wed, 7 Jul 2004 21:11:29 -0400, "Jason Cothran"
<reply@board.nomail> wrote:

>
>No but they cannot, by law, hold you to your contract if they change
>something to worsen your service.

Not to mention, implied warranties of merchantability. If the product
does not do what it was intended to do, they are in violation of the
UCC and most (most!) states laws.

Still, unless you have deep pockets and spare time, you will have to
negotiate the issue.
Anonymous
July 8, 2004 6:31:45 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

"Jimmy" <NoOneYet@Nowhere.Net> wrote in message
news:2kcpe0d6cv92th3n5e925ktfppq2a6jgcu@4ax.com...
> On Wed, 7 Jul 2004 21:11:29 -0400, "Jason Cothran"
> <reply@board.nomail> wrote:
>
> >
> >No but they cannot, by law, hold you to your contract if they change
> >something to worsen your service.
>
> Not to mention, implied warranties of merchantability. If the product
> does not do what it was intended to do, they are in violation of the
> UCC and most (most!) states laws.

And unless the network becomes completely unusable, the product does
continue to do what it was intended to do. If I were to move outside of the
coverage area, that would not represent a contract violation on the
carrier's part, even though my phone no longer connects to the network.
Unfortunately, many are under the impression that anything less than blanket
coverage is a violation of the TOS.

>
> Still, unless you have deep pockets and spare time, you will have to
> negotiate the issue.
>
>

And lots and lots of patience.
Anonymous
July 8, 2004 7:03:18 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

In article <2kcpe0d6cv92th3n5e925ktfppq2a6jgcu@4ax.com>,
Jimmy <NoOneYet@Nowhere.Net> wrote:

> On Wed, 7 Jul 2004 21:11:29 -0400, "Jason Cothran"
> <reply@board.nomail> wrote:
>
> >
> >No but they cannot, by law, hold you to your contract if they change
> >something to worsen your service.
>
> Not to mention, implied warranties of merchantability. If the product
> does not do what it was intended to do, they are in violation of the
> UCC and most (most!) states laws.
>
> Still, unless you have deep pockets and spare time, you will have to
> negotiate the issue.

Often a simple letter to one's States' Attorney General motivates a
Carrier to action.
Anonymous
July 8, 2004 7:03:19 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

"Robert M." <rmarkoff@faq.cIty> wrote in message
news:rmarkoff-CD8116.22031807072004@news03.east.earthlink.net...

>
> Often a simple letter to one's States' Attorney General motivates a
> Carrier to action.

We've been down this road before. All the carrier has to do is justify the
charges in question to satisfy the AG's office, and there is no evidence
that the consumer gets what they want in a majority of the complaints. If
they provide ANY documentation showing the charges to be valid, the issue is
dead. All you are promoting is a waste of tax dollars and resources.
July 9, 2004 12:30:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

What worked for me was a simple, calm letter to Verizon stating the facts.

They dropped the cancellation charges within a week and said sorry, thanks
for being a good customer.

JQP

"Robert M." <rmarkoff@faq.cIty> wrote in message
news:rmarkoff-CD8116.22031807072004@news03.east.earthlink.net...
> In article <2kcpe0d6cv92th3n5e925ktfppq2a6jgcu@4ax.com>,
> Jimmy <NoOneYet@Nowhere.Net> wrote:
>
> > On Wed, 7 Jul 2004 21:11:29 -0400, "Jason Cothran"
> > <reply@board.nomail> wrote:
> >
> > >
> > >No but they cannot, by law, hold you to your contract if they change
> > >something to worsen your service.
> >
> > Not to mention, implied warranties of merchantability. If the product
> > does not do what it was intended to do, they are in violation of the
> > UCC and most (most!) states laws.
> >
> > Still, unless you have deep pockets and spare time, you will have to
> > negotiate the issue.
>
> Often a simple letter to one's States' Attorney General motivates a
> Carrier to action.
!