Water cooling VS thermal load question

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I bought a water cooling setup for my computer, more for the
"geekiness" of it than anything else. Who wouldn't want to see green
water flowing inside a computer?

I'm not an overclocer, or pushing the envelope, but I wanted a
solution to the NOISE generated by all the fans required to cool a
prescott 2.8 P4. After installing it, and running it for a while, I
noticed something. Before, the idle temperature was X and the
load temperature was 15-25 degrees (F) above idle. Now, the
idle and load temperatures hardly move but a degree or two.
My thinking, is that with a stable temperature, wouldn't the stress
on the CPU be less than always jumping up and down?
Just wondering........
9 answers Last reply
More about water cooling thermal load question
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    That's exactly what water cooling is all about. Lower temps and less stress
    on the cooled parts = longer life.

    But then, you would probably change the computer before the NORMAL temps
    caused any problem anyway (-:

    --

    Regards:

    Richard Urban

    aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)


    "p51d007" <p51d007@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:htlso0tbr1pphd5kmb6fktp74o436ojpel@4ax.com...
    >I bought a water cooling setup for my computer, more for the
    > "geekiness" of it than anything else. Who wouldn't want to see green
    > water flowing inside a computer?
    >
    > I'm not an overclocer, or pushing the envelope, but I wanted a
    > solution to the NOISE generated by all the fans required to cool a
    > prescott 2.8 P4. After installing it, and running it for a while, I
    > noticed something. Before, the idle temperature was X and the
    > load temperature was 15-25 degrees (F) above idle. Now, the
    > idle and load temperatures hardly move but a degree or two.
    > My thinking, is that with a stable temperature, wouldn't the stress
    > on the CPU be less than always jumping up and down?
    > Just wondering........
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    p51d007 wrote <and I snipped>:

    > My thinking, is that with a stable temperature, wouldn't the stress
    > on the CPU be less than always jumping up and down?
    > Just wondering........
    >

    Yes, but the incremental stress caused by running apps on an otherwise
    idle CPU is tiny compared with the thermal stress caused by booting up
    a stone cold PC.

    You can avoid that tiny stress by always running something at low priority.
    I suggest downloading Prime95, to do something useful with your wasted CPU
    cycles; get it at http://www.mersenne.org/freesoft.htm
    --
    Cheers, Bob
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    I also run water cooling, my PC runs 24/7 and gets the occasional reboot for
    software updates, etc. When not gaming or video editing, I run Folding@Home
    and that keeps my cpu always "hot" in addition to helping find a cure for
    cancer. As you noticed the temperature delta between idle and full load is
    much less using water cooling. Not to mention quieter. If your delta is only
    2 or 3 degrees above idle, that is fantastic and shows your cooling solution
    is nowhere near it's heat saturation point. Crank that baby up on some sort
    of distributed computing software and help humanity find prime numbers, look
    for aliens, or cure cancer!

    --
    Blackwood Toyota Parts Dept.
    "p51d007" <p51d007@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:htlso0tbr1pphd5kmb6fktp74o436ojpel@4ax.com...
    > I bought a water cooling setup for my computer, more for the
    > "geekiness" of it than anything else. Who wouldn't want to see green
    > water flowing inside a computer?
    >
    > I'm not an overclocer, or pushing the envelope, but I wanted a
    > solution to the NOISE generated by all the fans required to cool a
    > prescott 2.8 P4. After installing it, and running it for a while, I
    > noticed something. Before, the idle temperature was X and the
    > load temperature was 15-25 degrees (F) above idle. Now, the
    > idle and load temperatures hardly move but a degree or two.
    > My thinking, is that with a stable temperature, wouldn't the stress
    > on the CPU be less than always jumping up and down?
    > Just wondering........
    >
    >


    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.789 / Virus Database: 534 - Release Date: 11/7/2004
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    In article <eXLrw#ZxEHA.4044@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl>, Keith
    <ANTISPAMraptur@cox-internet.com> writes
    >I also run water cooling, my PC runs 24/7 and gets the occasional reboot for
    >software updates, etc. When not gaming or video editing, I run Folding@Home
    >and that keeps my cpu always "hot" in addition to helping find a cure for
    >cancer. As you noticed the temperature delta between idle and full load is
    >much less using water cooling. Not to mention quieter. If your delta is only

    <blah>

    Do these water cooling kits really work then?

    --
    andy
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Of course, that is the whole point of using them.

    andy wrote:

    > In article <eXLrw#ZxEHA.4044@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl>, Keith
    > <ANTISPAMraptur@cox-internet.com> writes
    >
    >>I also run water cooling, my PC runs 24/7 and gets the occasional reboot for
    >>software updates, etc. When not gaming or video editing, I run Folding@Home
    >>and that keeps my cpu always "hot" in addition to helping find a cure for
    >>cancer. As you noticed the temperature delta between idle and full load is
    >>much less using water cooling. Not to mention quieter. If your delta is only
    >>
    >
    > <blah>
    >
    > Do these water cooling kits really work then?
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    They cool to a baseline of room temperature.. they are quiet, but introduce
    problems relating to placement of cooling pipes.. best probably used in a
    largish case.. apparently the green fluid in clear pipes looks good when lit
    by cold-cathode lighting.. obviously, a see through case or panel is
    required to make the most of the view..


    "andy" <andy@microshade.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:AQVfYCAavNkBNw$S@microshade.demon.co.uk...
    > In article <eXLrw#ZxEHA.4044@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl>, Keith
    > <ANTISPAMraptur@cox-internet.com> writes
    >>I also run water cooling, my PC runs 24/7 and gets the occasional reboot
    >>for
    >>software updates, etc. When not gaming or video editing, I run
    >>Folding@Home
    >>and that keeps my cpu always "hot" in addition to helping find a cure for
    >>cancer. As you noticed the temperature delta between idle and full load is
    >>much less using water cooling. Not to mention quieter. If your delta is
    >>only
    >
    > <blah>
    >
    > Do these water cooling kits really work then?
    >
    > --
    > andy
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Yes, water cooling works and you can buy a kit that will fit
    your CPU, graphics and RAM, even the hard drive. One reason
    water cooling is better than air cooling is that air is an
    insulator unless it is moving since it has a low specific
    heat (the amount of heat calories) that still air can
    absorb. Even when not being pumped, water absorbs a large
    amount of heat and thus the CPU and other parts do not spike
    in the same way an air-cooled machine can.


    --
    The people think the Constitution protects their rights;
    But government sees it as an obstacle to be overcome.


    "andy" <andy@microshade.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:AQVfYCAavNkBNw$S@microshade.demon.co.uk...
    | In article <eXLrw#ZxEHA.4044@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl>, Keith
    | <ANTISPAMraptur@cox-internet.com> writes
    | >I also run water cooling, my PC runs 24/7 and gets the
    occasional reboot for
    | >software updates, etc. When not gaming or video editing,
    I run Folding@Home
    | >and that keeps my cpu always "hot" in addition to helping
    find a cure for
    | >cancer. As you noticed the temperature delta between idle
    and full load is
    | >much less using water cooling. Not to mention quieter. If
    your delta is only
    |
    | <blah>
    |
    | Do these water cooling kits really work then?
    |
    | --
    | andy
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Damn. I believe the question has already been answered if you will read the
    posts just above yours!

    --

    Regards:

    Richard Urban

    aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)


    "andy" <andy@microshade.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:AQVfYCAavNkBNw$S@microshade.demon.co.uk...
    > In article <eXLrw#ZxEHA.4044@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl>, Keith
    > <ANTISPAMraptur@cox-internet.com> writes
    >>I also run water cooling, my PC runs 24/7 and gets the occasional reboot
    >>for
    >>software updates, etc. When not gaming or video editing, I run
    >>Folding@Home
    >>and that keeps my cpu always "hot" in addition to helping find a cure for
    >>cancer. As you noticed the temperature delta between idle and full load is
    >>much less using water cooling. Not to mention quieter. If your delta is
    >>only
    >
    > <blah>
    >
    > Do these water cooling kits really work then?
    >
    > --
    > andy
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    In article <eXtrRUoxEHA.1188@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl>, Mike Hall
    <mike.hall.mail@sympatico.ca> writes
    >They cool to a baseline of room temperature.. they are quiet, but introduce
    >problems relating to placement of cooling pipes.. best probably used in a
    >largish case.. apparently the green fluid in clear pipes looks good when lit
    >by cold-cathode lighting.. obviously, a see through case or panel is
    >required to make the most of the view..
    >
    >

    And I thought they where just a geeky computer trip.
    Think I might get one, especially if they're quieter
    than the enormous fan I have in mine.

    Thanks Mike.

    All the best.
    --
    andy
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