How many drives does XP 2003 Pro support

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Assuming extra cards are installed, how many drives will XP 2003 Pro support?
Physical, Logical or partitions?
I am aware of the 256 (cluster) terabyte limit depending on cluster size.
I just read a support doc that said it was still 4 channels with 8 drives
like win98. Can't be true.
Thanks
12 answers Last reply
More about drives 2003 support
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    The 8 drives you mentioned is supposed to mean 8 IDE devices, as best I
    remember it. I would assume the limit would be higher using SATA drives but,
    so far, I haven't read anything on a limit. My ABIT mobo will support 2
    floppies, 4 IDE devices and 6 SATA. Nothing in the manaul says anything
    about add-in conrtroller cards being limited.

    "assignor" <assignor@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:C6A466E6-7E42-4C72-8C98-5BE544A9DE13@microsoft.com...
    > Assuming extra cards are installed, how many drives will XP 2003 Pro
    > support?
    > Physical, Logical or partitions?
    > I am aware of the 256 (cluster) terabyte limit depending on cluster size.
    > I just read a support doc that said it was still 4 channels with 8 drives
    > like win98. Can't be true.
    > Thanks
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Any Physical constraint would be a limitation of the BIOS and or hardware.
    Logical constraints would be a limitation on how the user configured the
    drives and/or partitions - whether they are assigned a physical drive letter
    or assigned as just a mount point with another drives file system. Also the
    256TB limitation is for a single volume, not drive and/or partition. A
    volume may be made up of many drives and/or partitions. A single workstation
    can have many "volumes".

    --

    StringFellow Hawk

    "Dom, Give me Turbos"
    "assignor" <assignor@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:C6A466E6-7E42-4C72-8C98-5BE544A9DE13@microsoft.com...
    > Assuming extra cards are installed, how many drives will XP 2003 Pro
    support?
    > Physical, Logical or partitions?
    > I am aware of the 256 (cluster) terabyte limit depending on cluster size.
    > I just read a support doc that said it was still 4 channels with 8 drives
    > like win98. Can't be true.
    > Thanks
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    XP Drive Management

    • Windows XP supports up to four partitions per hard disk.
    • Windows XP supports two main partition TYPES: Primary and Extended.
    • Windows XP supports three file systems NTFS, FAT32 and FAT [the latter 2
    being introduced with earlier Windows systems].
    • A primary partition is one from which one can boot up an Operating System.
    • All four partitions can be designated as Primary [or bootable, should one
    wish to install more than one Operating System, such as XP, 98, Linux etc].
    • One primary partition at a time must be marked as ‘Active’ designating it
    as the one from which the computer will boot: in almost all cases this should
    be the ‘C-Drive’.
    • One partition can be allocated as an Extended Partition. These differ in
    that they are not formatted with a file system or assigned a specific drive
    letter [‘D’, thru to ‘Z’].
    • An Extended Partition is then a dedicated area of disk space in which one
    can then create a number of Logical Drives.
    • Logical Drives are similar to primary partitions in that they are
    individually formatted with a file system and assigned a drive letter: thus
    an extended partition can have an unlimited number of Logical Drives each
    with its own drive letter, none of the Logical drives is bootable.
    • Use for logical drives can be to assign a specific drive letter [logical
    drive] for each file type [word document, email, MP3] or on a computer with
    many users, one or more logical drive per user.
    • Of the file systems, NTFS is the most versatile and the newest, with a 32
    bit address structure which gives it the ability to access the very large
    disk drives available now [200Gb drives generally available] and in the
    future.
    • Limitations for each file system are:
    o FAT – only addresses up to 4Gb of disk space [Windows XP, 95 and earlier
    Windows versions only]
    o FAT32 - only addresses up to 32Gb of disk space [Windows XP, Me 98 and 95
    Second Edition]
    o NTFS - addresses up to 2,000Gb of disk space [Windows XP]
    • One would use a partitioned hard drive formatted as FAT32 or FAT should
    one wish to accommodate a dual boot system [running XP or an earlier
    Operating System].
    • Should one have Windows XP Pro, a further benefit of NTFS is that files
    can be encrypted.


    "assignor" wrote:

    > Assuming extra cards are installed, how many drives will XP 2003 Pro support?
    > Physical, Logical or partitions?
    > I am aware of the 256 (cluster) terabyte limit depending on cluster size.
    > I just read a support doc that said it was still 4 channels with 8 drives
    > like win98. Can't be true.
    > Thanks
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    What has all that info got to do with the question of how many drives will
    XP support?

    "BAR" <BAR@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:14165E55-243B-4916-AB9B-A5809B284F22@microsoft.com...
    > XP Drive Management
    >
    > . Windows XP supports up to four partitions per hard disk.
    > . Windows XP supports two main partition TYPES: Primary and Extended.
    > . Windows XP supports three file systems NTFS, FAT32 and FAT [the latter 2
    > being introduced with earlier Windows systems].
    > . A primary partition is one from which one can boot up an Operating
    > System.
    > . All four partitions can be designated as Primary [or bootable, should
    > one
    > wish to install more than one Operating System, such as XP, 98, Linux
    > etc].
    > . One primary partition at a time must be marked as 'Active' designating
    > it
    > as the one from which the computer will boot: in almost all cases this
    > should
    > be the 'C-Drive'.
    > . One partition can be allocated as an Extended Partition. These differ
    > in
    > that they are not formatted with a file system or assigned a specific
    > drive
    > letter ['D', thru to 'Z'].
    > . An Extended Partition is then a dedicated area of disk space in which
    > one
    > can then create a number of Logical Drives.
    > . Logical Drives are similar to primary partitions in that they are
    > individually formatted with a file system and assigned a drive letter:
    > thus
    > an extended partition can have an unlimited number of Logical Drives each
    > with its own drive letter, none of the Logical drives is bootable.
    > . Use for logical drives can be to assign a specific drive letter [logical
    > drive] for each file type [word document, email, MP3] or on a computer
    > with
    > many users, one or more logical drive per user.
    > . Of the file systems, NTFS is the most versatile and the newest, with a
    > 32
    > bit address structure which gives it the ability to access the very large
    > disk drives available now [200Gb drives generally available] and in the
    > future.
    > . Limitations for each file system are:
    > o FAT - only addresses up to 4Gb of disk space [Windows XP, 95 and earlier
    > Windows versions only]
    > o FAT32 - only addresses up to 32Gb of disk space [Windows XP, Me 98 and
    > 95
    > Second Edition]
    > o NTFS - addresses up to 2,000Gb of disk space [Windows XP]
    > . One would use a partitioned hard drive formatted as FAT32 or FAT should
    > one wish to accommodate a dual boot system [running XP or an earlier
    > Operating System].
    > . Should one have Windows XP Pro, a further benefit of NTFS is that files
    > can be encrypted.
    >
    >
    >
    > "assignor" wrote:
    >
    >> Assuming extra cards are installed, how many drives will XP 2003 Pro
    >> support?
    >> Physical, Logical or partitions?
    >> I am aware of the 256 (cluster) terabyte limit depending on cluster size.
    >> I just read a support doc that said it was still 4 channels with 8 drives
    >> like win98. Can't be true.
    >> Thanks
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Not to dispute your wisdom, but NT OS's can only format a FAT32 partition up
    to 32GB, but can access FAT32 partitions much larger (provided they are
    formatted with a Win9x OS).
    NTFS addresses NTFS partitions/drives/volumes much larger than 2000GB (2TB),
    as I have said 256TB is nominal, but larger is available considering NTFS
    capability of mounting partitions/drives as folders (i.e. mountpoints)
    within other folders on different drives/partitions.

    --

    StringFellow Hawk

    "Dom, Give me Turbos"
    "BAR" <BAR@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:14165E55-243B-4916-AB9B-A5809B284F22@microsoft.com...
    > XP Drive Management
    >
    > . Windows XP supports up to four partitions per hard disk.
    > . Windows XP supports two main partition TYPES: Primary and Extended.
    > . Windows XP supports three file systems NTFS, FAT32 and FAT [the latter 2
    > being introduced with earlier Windows systems].
    > . A primary partition is one from which one can boot up an Operating
    System.
    > . All four partitions can be designated as Primary [or bootable, should
    one
    > wish to install more than one Operating System, such as XP, 98, Linux
    etc].
    > . One primary partition at a time must be marked as 'Active' designating
    it
    > as the one from which the computer will boot: in almost all cases this
    should
    > be the 'C-Drive'.
    > . One partition can be allocated as an Extended Partition. These differ
    in
    > that they are not formatted with a file system or assigned a specific
    drive
    > letter ['D', thru to 'Z'].
    > . An Extended Partition is then a dedicated area of disk space in which
    one
    > can then create a number of Logical Drives.
    > . Logical Drives are similar to primary partitions in that they are
    > individually formatted with a file system and assigned a drive letter:
    thus
    > an extended partition can have an unlimited number of Logical Drives each
    > with its own drive letter, none of the Logical drives is bootable.
    > . Use for logical drives can be to assign a specific drive letter [logical
    > drive] for each file type [word document, email, MP3] or on a computer
    with
    > many users, one or more logical drive per user.
    > . Of the file systems, NTFS is the most versatile and the newest, with a
    32
    > bit address structure which gives it the ability to access the very large
    > disk drives available now [200Gb drives generally available] and in the
    > future.
    > . Limitations for each file system are:
    > o FAT - only addresses up to 4Gb of disk space [Windows XP, 95 and earlier
    > Windows versions only]
    > o FAT32 - only addresses up to 32Gb of disk space [Windows XP, Me 98 and
    95
    > Second Edition]
    > o NTFS - addresses up to 2,000Gb of disk space [Windows XP]
    > . One would use a partitioned hard drive formatted as FAT32 or FAT should
    > one wish to accommodate a dual boot system [running XP or an earlier
    > Operating System].
    > . Should one have Windows XP Pro, a further benefit of NTFS is that files
    > can be encrypted.
    >
    >
    >
    > "assignor" wrote:
    >
    > > Assuming extra cards are installed, how many drives will XP 2003 Pro
    support?
    > > Physical, Logical or partitions?
    > > I am aware of the 256 (cluster) terabyte limit depending on cluster
    size.
    > > I just read a support doc that said it was still 4 channels with 8
    drives
    > > like win98. Can't be true.
    > > Thanks
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    A minor correction about FAT32 and NTFS taken from the Microsoft KB:
    FAT32 Features
    FAT32 provides the following enhancements over previous implementations of
    the FAT file system: . FAT32 supports drives up to 2 terabytes in size.

    NOTE: Microsoft Windows 2000 only supports FAT32 partitions up to a
    size of 32 GB.


    Removing Limitations
    First, NTFS has greatly increased the size of files and volumes, so that
    they can now be up to 2^64 bytes (16 exabytes or 18,446,744,073,709,551,616
    bytes). NTFS has also returned to the FAT concept of clusters in order to
    avoid HPFS problem of a fixed sector size. This was done because Windows NT
    is a portable operating system and different disk technology is likely to be
    encountered at some point. Therefore, 512 bytes per sector was viewed as
    having a large possibility of not always being a good fit for the
    allocation. This was accomplished by allowing the cluster to be defined as
    multiples of the hardware's natural allocation size. Finally, in NTFS all
    filenames are Unicode based, and 8.3 filenames are kept along with long
    filenames.


    "BAR" <BAR@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:14165E55-243B-4916-AB9B-A5809B284F22@microsoft.com...
    XP Drive Management

    .. Windows XP supports up to four partitions per hard disk.
    .. Windows XP supports two main partition TYPES: Primary and Extended.
    .. Windows XP supports three file systems NTFS, FAT32 and FAT [the latter 2
    being introduced with earlier Windows systems].
    .. A primary partition is one from which one can boot up an Operating System.
    .. All four partitions can be designated as Primary [or bootable, should one
    wish to install more than one Operating System, such as XP, 98, Linux etc].
    .. One primary partition at a time must be marked as 'Active' designating it
    as the one from which the computer will boot: in almost all cases this
    should
    be the 'C-Drive'.
    .. One partition can be allocated as an Extended Partition. These differ in
    that they are not formatted with a file system or assigned a specific drive
    letter ['D', thru to 'Z'].
    .. An Extended Partition is then a dedicated area of disk space in which one
    can then create a number of Logical Drives.
    .. Logical Drives are similar to primary partitions in that they are
    individually formatted with a file system and assigned a drive letter: thus
    an extended partition can have an unlimited number of Logical Drives each
    with its own drive letter, none of the Logical drives is bootable.
    .. Use for logical drives can be to assign a specific drive letter [logical
    drive] for each file type [word document, email, MP3] or on a computer with
    many users, one or more logical drive per user.
    .. Of the file systems, NTFS is the most versatile and the newest, with a 32
    bit address structure which gives it the ability to access the very large
    disk drives available now [200Gb drives generally available] and in the
    future.
    .. Limitations for each file system are:
    o FAT - only addresses up to 4Gb of disk space [Windows XP, 95 and earlier
    Windows versions only]
    o FAT32 - only addresses up to 32Gb of disk space [Windows XP, Me 98 and 95
    Second Edition]
    o NTFS - addresses up to 2,000Gb of disk space [Windows XP]
    .. One would use a partitioned hard drive formatted as FAT32 or FAT should
    one wish to accommodate a dual boot system [running XP or an earlier
    Operating System].
    .. Should one have Windows XP Pro, a further benefit of NTFS is that files
    can be encrypted.


    "assignor" wrote:

    > Assuming extra cards are installed, how many drives will XP 2003 Pro
    > support?
    > Physical, Logical or partitions?
    > I am aware of the 256 (cluster) terabyte limit depending on cluster size.
    > I just read a support doc that said it was still 4 channels with 8 drives
    > like win98. Can't be true.
    > Thanks
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Isn't that 27 drive letters?

    "BR549" <spamspam@spam.com> wrote in message
    news:J6Tld.22158$8G4.11544@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
    >A minor correction about FAT32 and NTFS taken from the Microsoft KB:
    > FAT32 Features
    > FAT32 provides the following enhancements over previous implementations of
    > the FAT file system: . FAT32 supports drives up to 2 terabytes in size.
    >
    > NOTE: Microsoft Windows 2000 only supports FAT32 partitions up to a
    > size of 32 GB.
    >
    >
    >
    > Removing Limitations
    > First, NTFS has greatly increased the size of files and volumes, so that
    > they can now be up to 2^64 bytes (16 exabytes or
    > 18,446,744,073,709,551,616
    > bytes). NTFS has also returned to the FAT concept of clusters in order to
    > avoid HPFS problem of a fixed sector size. This was done because Windows
    > NT
    > is a portable operating system and different disk technology is likely to
    > be
    > encountered at some point. Therefore, 512 bytes per sector was viewed as
    > having a large possibility of not always being a good fit for the
    > allocation. This was accomplished by allowing the cluster to be defined as
    > multiples of the hardware's natural allocation size. Finally, in NTFS all
    > filenames are Unicode based, and 8.3 filenames are kept along with long
    > filenames.
    >
    >
    >
    > "BAR" <BAR@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:14165E55-243B-4916-AB9B-A5809B284F22@microsoft.com...
    > XP Drive Management
    >
    > . Windows XP supports up to four partitions per hard disk.
    > . Windows XP supports two main partition TYPES: Primary and Extended.
    > . Windows XP supports three file systems NTFS, FAT32 and FAT [the latter 2
    > being introduced with earlier Windows systems].
    > . A primary partition is one from which one can boot up an Operating
    > System.
    > . All four partitions can be designated as Primary [or bootable, should
    > one
    > wish to install more than one Operating System, such as XP, 98, Linux
    > etc].
    > . One primary partition at a time must be marked as 'Active' designating
    > it
    > as the one from which the computer will boot: in almost all cases this
    > should
    > be the 'C-Drive'.
    > . One partition can be allocated as an Extended Partition. These differ
    > in
    > that they are not formatted with a file system or assigned a specific
    > drive
    > letter ['D', thru to 'Z'].
    > . An Extended Partition is then a dedicated area of disk space in which
    > one
    > can then create a number of Logical Drives.
    > . Logical Drives are similar to primary partitions in that they are
    > individually formatted with a file system and assigned a drive letter:
    > thus
    > an extended partition can have an unlimited number of Logical Drives each
    > with its own drive letter, none of the Logical drives is bootable.
    > . Use for logical drives can be to assign a specific drive letter [logical
    > drive] for each file type [word document, email, MP3] or on a computer
    > with
    > many users, one or more logical drive per user.
    > . Of the file systems, NTFS is the most versatile and the newest, with a
    > 32
    > bit address structure which gives it the ability to access the very large
    > disk drives available now [200Gb drives generally available] and in the
    > future.
    > . Limitations for each file system are:
    > o FAT - only addresses up to 4Gb of disk space [Windows XP, 95 and earlier
    > Windows versions only]
    > o FAT32 - only addresses up to 32Gb of disk space [Windows XP, Me 98 and
    > 95
    > Second Edition]
    > o NTFS - addresses up to 2,000Gb of disk space [Windows XP]
    > . One would use a partitioned hard drive formatted as FAT32 or FAT should
    > one wish to accommodate a dual boot system [running XP or an earlier
    > Operating System].
    > . Should one have Windows XP Pro, a further benefit of NTFS is that files
    > can be encrypted.
    >
    >
    >
    > "assignor" wrote:
    >
    >> Assuming extra cards are installed, how many drives will XP 2003 Pro
    >> support?
    >> Physical, Logical or partitions?
    >> I am aware of the 256 (cluster) terabyte limit depending on cluster size.
    >> I just read a support doc that said it was still 4 channels with 8 drives
    >> like win98. Can't be true.
    >> Thanks
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    First, XP and 2003 are two different products! XP is WIndows version 2002
    and Windows 2003 is a server based Windows.


    "assignor" <assignor@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:C6A466E6-7E42-4C72-8C98-5BE544A9DE13@microsoft.com...
    > Assuming extra cards are installed, how many drives will XP 2003 Pro
    > support?
    > Physical, Logical or partitions?
    > I am aware of the 256 (cluster) terabyte limit depending on cluster size.
    > I just read a support doc that said it was still 4 channels with 8 drives
    > like win98. Can't be true.
    > Thanks
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    From everything that I can see that would be 26 drives(A to Z).

    "assignor" wrote:

    > Assuming extra cards are installed, how many drives will XP 2003 Pro support?
    > Physical, Logical or partitions?
    > I am aware of the 256 (cluster) terabyte limit depending on cluster size.
    > I just read a support doc that said it was still 4 channels with 8 drives
    > like win98. Can't be true.
    > Thanks
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Since "XP 2003 Pro" is not a product, the correct answer is none. The
    "support doc" you read must have been referring to strictly IDE drive
    support and that would be 2 drives per channel and 4 channels. Any other
    drive connection protocol will have it own set of limits.

    assignor wrote:

    > Assuming extra cards are installed, how many drives will XP 2003 Pro support?
    > Physical, Logical or partitions?
    > I am aware of the 256 (cluster) terabyte limit depending on cluster size.
    > I just read a support doc that said it was still 4 channels with 8 drives
    > like win98. Can't be true.
    > Thanks
    >
  11. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    A and B are reserved for floppy drives/removable disk media drives. So
    really you have 24 letters to work with. Also, the limitation of the
    number of partitions allowed can be bypassed with dynamic volumes if
    need be.

    -----
    Nathan McNulty
    Swap gmail with name for email :)

    tfw48079 wrote:
    > From everything that I can see that would be 26 drives(A to Z).
    >
    > "assignor" wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Assuming extra cards are installed, how many drives will XP 2003 Pro support?
    >>Physical, Logical or partitions?
    >>I am aware of the 256 (cluster) terabyte limit depending on cluster size.
    >>I just read a support doc that said it was still 4 channels with 8 drives
    >>like win98. Can't be true.
    >>Thanks
  12. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Actually, XP is NOT Windows versin 2002. It is Windows XP Home or
    Windows XP Professional. People often refer to is as Windows 2002 but
    there is no such version. Just like there is no version of Windows
    known popularly as Windows XP Pro Corporate. Neither of these exist
    but people refer to them by those names.

    On Mon, 15 Nov 2004 10:58:34 -0500, "Yves Leclerc"
    <yleclercNOSPAM@maysys.com> wrote:

    >First, XP and 2003 are two different products! XP is WIndows version 2002
    >and Windows 2003 is a server based Windows.
    >
    >
    >"assignor" <assignor@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >news:C6A466E6-7E42-4C72-8C98-5BE544A9DE13@microsoft.com...
    >> Assuming extra cards are installed, how many drives will XP 2003 Pro
    >> support?
    >> Physical, Logical or partitions?
    >> I am aware of the 256 (cluster) terabyte limit depending on cluster size.
    >> I just read a support doc that said it was still 4 channels with 8 drives
    >> like win98. Can't be true.
    >> Thanks
    >
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