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replacing motherboard

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Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
November 14, 2004 11:03:08 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I'm running XP Pro SP2. I'm planning on changing the motherboard

Is it true that I have to do a repair installation from the CD if I
change the motherboard? This sounds like it would create a bit of a
mess with previously installed programs and profile settings.

I know some companies like Gateway have a single XP image (and images
of other Windows versions) that will work on any system meeting the
minimum hardware requirements, no matter the chipset. When Windows
starts up, it notices the new hardware (including motherboard
components and other devices present) and all is fine after you locate
the drivers (it doesn't have to be right away). Isn't there a way to
do this using an existing installation? By cleaning out the HKLM
portion of the registry or something?

Dave

More about : replacing motherboard

Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
November 14, 2004 11:03:09 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"David K" <noemail@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:8ldfp05tttda65vmk0l3e65o4sv9a6m14o@4ax.com...
> I'm running XP Pro SP2. I'm planning on changing the motherboard
>
> Is it true that I have to do a repair installation from the CD if I
> change the motherboard? This sounds like it would create a bit of a
> mess with previously installed programs and profile settings.
>

Normally, and assuming a retail license (many OEM installations
and licenses are not transferable to a new motherboard - check yours
before starting), unless the new motherboard is virtually identical
(same chipset, same IDE controllers, same BIOS version, etc.) to the
one on which the WinXP installation was originally performed, you'll
need to perform a repair (a.k.a. in-place upgrade) installation, at
the very least:

How to Perform an In-Place Upgrade of Windows XP
http://support.microsoft.com/directory/article.asp?ID=K...;EN-US;Q315341

The "why" is quite simple, really, and has nothing to do with
licensing issues, per se; it's a purely technical matter, at this
point. You've pulled the proverbial hardware rug out from under the
OS. (If you don't like -- or get -- the rug analogy, think of it as
picking up a Cape Cod style home and then setting it down onto a Ranch
style foundation. It just isn't going to fit.) WinXP, like Win2K
before it, is not nearly as "promiscuous" as Win9x when it comes to
accepting any old hardware configuration you throw at it. On
installation it "tailors" itself to the specific hardware found. This
is one of the reasons that the entire WinNT/2K/XP OS family is so much
more stable than the Win9x group.

As always when undertaking such a significant change, back up any
important data before starting.

This will also probably require re-activation, unless you have a
Volume Licensed version of WinXP Pro installed. If it's been more
than 120 days since you last activated that specific Product Key,
you'll most likely be able to activate via the internet without
problem. If it's been less, you might have to make a 5 minute phone
call.


> I know some companies like Gateway have a single XP image (and
> images
> of other Windows versions) that will work on any system meeting the
> minimum hardware requirements, no matter the chipset. When Windows
> starts up, it notices the new hardware (including motherboard
> components and other devices present) and all is fine after you
> locate
> the drivers (it doesn't have to be right away). Isn't there a way to
> do this using an existing installation? By cleaning out the HKLM
> portion of the registry or something?
>


No, OEM manufacturers have a separate, specific image that they
use for each individual model computer that the assemble and ship.

--

Bruce Chambers

Help us help you:
http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on
having both at once. - RAH
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
November 14, 2004 11:22:20 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"David K" <noemail@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:8ldfp05tttda65vmk0l3e65o4sv9a6m14o@4ax.com...
| I'm running XP Pro SP2. I'm planning on changing the motherboard
|
| Is it true that I have to do a repair installation from the CD if I
| change the motherboard? This sounds like it would create a bit of a
| mess with previously installed programs and profile settings.
|
| I know some companies like Gateway have a single XP image (and images
| of other Windows versions) that will work on any system meeting the
| minimum hardware requirements, no matter the chipset. When Windows
| starts up, it notices the new hardware (including motherboard
| components and other devices present) and all is fine after you locate
| the drivers (it doesn't have to be right away). Isn't there a way to
| do this using an existing installation? By cleaning out the HKLM
| portion of the registry or something?
|
| Dave


Hi Dave -

Most recommend that you perform a Repair installation. This is generally
non-destructive, though it wipes out any Service Pack Updates and Windows
Updates that are not included on your XP CD. For example, if you have
Service Pack 2 installed and your Windows XP CD was the original XP release,
both Service Pack 1 and 2 and all Windows Updates since Service Pack 2 are
wiped away. You can avoid this problem by slip-streaming your XP CD with
Service Pack 2 (search the web for methods on doing this).

A successful Repair Installation will retain all of your applications and
user data and most of your user settings.

I say "successful" because, with any Windows installation, you run the risk
of something going awry and end up needing to perform a Clean Install. Back
up critical data prior to any reinstallation.

Search this group for the many posts made on how to perform a Repair
Install.

Alternatively, if you have a XP CD that contains all of the Microsoft
Utilities (many pre-installed XP installations don't), you can use the
Sysprep Utility:

You will need to extract files from the Windows XP CD. Files are located at
CD:SUPPORTTOOLS in a cab file called Deploy.cab. The files are Sysprep.exe
and Setupcl.exe. Extract these files to the same folder.

With the old motherboard still in the system:

You run Sysprep.exe and tell it to "RESEAL" Windows XP. Note that it will
shutdown the PC when it completes the reseal process.

Now pull out the old MB, install the new one and fire up the machine. It
re-activates Windows XP and populates the device manager list.

You will need to re-activate with the same key-code. Your applications,
data, user settings, Service Pack Updates and Windows Updates will all be
retained.

Again... back up before attempting anything!

Jef
Related resources
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
November 15, 2004 12:51:44 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Jef,

I had a suspicion that sysprep could help me do what I wished. That
sounds like exactly what I want to happen. I'll give it a try!

Thanks,
Dave


On Sun, 14 Nov 2004 20:22:20 GMT, "Jef Norton"
>Hi Dave -
>
>Most recommend that you perform a Repair installation. This is generally
>non-destructive, though it wipes out any Service Pack Updates and Windows
>Updates that are not included on your XP CD. For example, if you have
>Service Pack 2 installed and your Windows XP CD was the original XP release,
>both Service Pack 1 and 2 and all Windows Updates since Service Pack 2 are
>wiped away. You can avoid this problem by slip-streaming your XP CD with
>Service Pack 2 (search the web for methods on doing this).
>
>A successful Repair Installation will retain all of your applications and
>user data and most of your user settings.
>
>I say "successful" because, with any Windows installation, you run the risk
>of something going awry and end up needing to perform a Clean Install. Back
>up critical data prior to any reinstallation.
>
>Search this group for the many posts made on how to perform a Repair
>Install.
>
>Alternatively, if you have a XP CD that contains all of the Microsoft
>Utilities (many pre-installed XP installations don't), you can use the
>Sysprep Utility:
>
>You will need to extract files from the Windows XP CD. Files are located at
>CD:SUPPORTTOOLS in a cab file called Deploy.cab. The files are Sysprep.exe
>and Setupcl.exe. Extract these files to the same folder.
>
>With the old motherboard still in the system:
>
>You run Sysprep.exe and tell it to "RESEAL" Windows XP. Note that it will
>shutdown the PC when it completes the reseal process.
>
>Now pull out the old MB, install the new one and fire up the machine. It
>re-activates Windows XP and populates the device manager list.
>
>You will need to re-activate with the same key-code. Your applications,
>data, user settings, Service Pack Updates and Windows Updates will all be
>retained.
>
>Again... back up before attempting anything!

>Jef
>
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
November 15, 2004 1:20:31 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

On Sun, 14 Nov 2004 13:18:32 -0700, "Bruce Chambers"
<bruce_a_chambers@h0tmail.com> wrote:

> No, OEM manufacturers have a separate, specific image that they
>use for each individual model computer that the assemble and ship.

I worked for Gateway for a short time, and all the XP (and other OS)
systems we reloaded used the same image for that OS. But I guess it
could have been that all the XP models used the same motherboard. I
didn't have much reason to notice at the time. But the chipset and
other hardware was not preinstalled in the image; I watched it
individually detect the devices on Windows startup. This leads me to
believe that their XP images were not specific to the hardware.

Dave
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
November 15, 2004 10:19:37 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Well, you could be right. I guess it really depends on the
methods each particular OEM use; I've never visited a Gateway assembly
line. I'll make note of the difference for future reference.

--

Bruce Chambers

Help us help you:
http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on
having both at once. - RAH

"David K" <noemail@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:cklfp0labqj6farp3h2emjhpk1kvbl7cos@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 14 Nov 2004 13:18:32 -0700, "Bruce Chambers"
> <bruce_a_chambers@h0tmail.com> wrote:
>
>> No, OEM manufacturers have a separate, specific image that they
>>use for each individual model computer that the assemble and ship.
>
> I worked for Gateway for a short time, and all the XP (and other OS)
> systems we reloaded used the same image for that OS. But I guess it
> could have been that all the XP models used the same motherboard. I
> didn't have much reason to notice at the time. But the chipset and
> other hardware was not preinstalled in the image; I watched it
> individually detect the devices on Windows startup. This leads me to
> believe that their XP images were not specific to the hardware.
>
> Dave
!