GA-8KNXP (Rev. 2)-Based Computer: Multiple Beeps on >Cold<..

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.gigabyte (More info?)

I have had a computer built around this board almost two years with no
real issues.
Since it has gotten cold (~58°C at night in the house) this winter, I
have had multiple incidents where the computer will not even go through
the BIOS level start up. As soon as I turn on the machine, I get a
series of multiple beeps, then a brief silence, then multiple beeps,
silence, and then continuous beeps. The computer then does not boot.
When the air temperature is again above ~62°C, the computer will boot
and run just fine.


Is this expected behavior or is something going wrong (other than
letting the indoor temperature fall so far).
Thanks for your input.


Steve
15 answers Last reply
More about 8knxp based computer multiple beeps cold
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.gigabyte (More info?)

    Richard, thanks for the response.

    The beeping is not like any that I have heard or seen described in
    either the manual or in other sources.
    It is a series of very short sounds, too numerous to count, each burst
    lasting 5 or so seconds.

    You're right - - very wierd.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.gigabyte (More info?)

    <sgoldstn@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
    news:1106580803.067698.178110@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...

    > I have had a computer built around this board almost two years with no
    > real issues. Since it has gotten cold (~58°C at night in the house) this
    > winter, I have had multiple incidents where the computer will not even go
    > > through the BIOS level start up. As soon as I turn on the machine, I get
    > a
    > series of multiple beeps, then a brief silence, then multiple beeps,
    > silence, and then continuous beeps. The computer then does not boot.
    > When the air temperature is again above ~62°C, the computer will boot
    > and run just fine.

    > Is this expected behavior or is something going wrong (other than
    > letting the indoor temperature fall so far).

    I have a Rev. 1 of this same board, and on one occasion this Fall when I
    left the windows open one cool, humid night the POST failed the next
    morning--except in my case I had no beeps and the PSU clicked as if trying
    to reset. The temp never dropped below 68°F in the room, but the humidity
    that morning was >95%, and that exceeds the spec on the PSU.

    After I warmed everything up with a hair drier it booted fine and has ever
    since, regardless of temperature, but I no longer open the windows to the
    office overnight. This may not be your issue, and if your house is heated
    the humidity is probably much lower than the maximum spec for the mobo or
    PSU, unless you're opening the windows.

    OTOH, you may have some component that is contracting in the cold enough to
    cause a poor connection. If that is the case, I doubt if it is something
    you could troubleshoot. You might try reseating the CPU, memory, and cards
    just for the heck of it, but I doubt if that will change anything.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.gigabyte (More info?)

    <sgoldstn@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
    news:1106588323.414637.99540@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...

    > Richard, thanks for the response.
    >
    > The beeping is not like any that I have heard or seen described in
    > either the manual or in other sources.
    > It is a series of very short sounds, too numerous to count, each burst
    > lasting 5 or so seconds.

    I just posted on this thread just moments ago, but the more I think of it
    the more I'd recommend reseating everything, including PCI and AGP cards,
    memory, and if that doesn't help maybe even the CPU.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.gigabyte (More info?)

    > Is this expected behavior or is something going wrong (other than
    > letting the indoor temperature fall so far).


    Weird.

    1) As someone else mentioned, check the manual (for the meaning of the
    beeps).

    2) Once your machine is "warm enough" to boot, I'd recommend running
    memtest86 ...


    Kris
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.gigabyte (More info?)

    Thanks to all for the responses.

    Perhaps the best sense is that with some change in temperature, a
    poorly contacting component is no longer seated adequately. I may have
    done a test of the principle already. I have another computer in the
    same room (ASUS P4PE motherboard) that would not boot the day before.
    This machine went through POST but did not find my hard drive (primary
    IDE/master) to start the OS. I opened the case and repositioned
    eveything I could and, voila, the HD was autotyped by the BIOS and
    everything booted just fine. Will try the same gambit on the Gigabyte
    machine tonight.


    Bob Davis wrote:
    > <sgoldstn@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
    > news:1106580803.067698.178110@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
    >
    > > I have had a computer built around this board almost two years with
    no
    > > real issues. Since it has gotten cold (~58°C at night in the
    house) this
    > > winter, I have had multiple incidents where the computer will not
    even go
    > > > through the BIOS level start up. As soon as I turn on the
    machine, I get
    > > a
    > > series of multiple beeps, then a brief silence, then multiple
    beeps,
    > > silence, and then continuous beeps. The computer then does not
    boot.
    > > When the air temperature is again above ~62°C, the computer will
    boot
    > > and run just fine.
    >
    > > Is this expected behavior or is something going wrong (other than
    > > letting the indoor temperature fall so far).
    >
    > I have a Rev. 1 of this same board, and on one occasion this Fall
    when I
    > left the windows open one cool, humid night the POST failed the next
    > morning--except in my case I had no beeps and the PSU clicked as if
    trying
    > to reset. The temp never dropped below 68°F in the room, but the
    humidity
    > that morning was >95%, and that exceeds the spec on the PSU.
    >
    > After I warmed everything up with a hair drier it booted fine and has
    ever
    > since, regardless of temperature, but I no longer open the windows to
    the
    > office overnight. This may not be your issue, and if your house is
    heated
    > the humidity is probably much lower than the maximum spec for the
    mobo or
    > PSU, unless you're opening the windows.
    >
    > OTOH, you may have some component that is contracting in the cold
    enough to
    > cause a poor connection. If that is the case, I doubt if it is
    something
    > you could troubleshoot. You might try reseating the CPU, memory, and
    cards
    > just for the heck of it, but I doubt if that will change anything.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.gigabyte (More info?)

    Very weird i must say, have the same mobo.
    Look at the manual...it explains what those BIOS beeps are.


    <sgoldstn@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
    news:1106580803.067698.178110@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
    I have had a computer built around this board almost two years with no
    real issues.
    Since it has gotten cold (~58°C at night in the house) this winter, I
    have had multiple incidents where the computer will not even go through
    the BIOS level start up. As soon as I turn on the machine, I get a
    series of multiple beeps, then a brief silence, then multiple beeps,
    silence, and then continuous beeps. The computer then does not boot.
    When the air temperature is again above ~62°C, the computer will boot
    and run just fine.


    Is this expected behavior or is something going wrong (other than
    letting the indoor temperature fall so far).
    Thanks for your input.


    Steve
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.gigabyte (More info?)

    Dust - Dust - Dust

    Opened this floor standing tower case, and everything was coated.
    Took a brush and a vacuum to it, reseated the boards and all connectors.
    -- The moment of truth was brief as the machine started right up.

    Thanks to all for the suggestions.

    sgoldstn@ix.netcom.com wrote:
    > Thanks to all for the responses.
    >
    > Perhaps the best sense is that with some change in temperature, a
    > poorly contacting component is no longer seated adequately. I may have
    > done a test of the principle already. I have another computer in the
    > same room (ASUS P4PE motherboard) that would not boot the day before.
    > This machine went through POST but did not find my hard drive (primary
    > IDE/master) to start the OS. I opened the case and repositioned
    > eveything I could and, voila, the HD was autotyped by the BIOS and
    > everything booted just fine. Will try the same gambit on the Gigabyte
    > machine tonight.
    >
    >
    > Bob Davis wrote:
    >
    >><sgoldstn@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
    >>news:1106580803.067698.178110@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
    >>
    >>
    >>>I have had a computer built around this board almost two years with
    >
    > no
    >
    >>>real issues. Since it has gotten cold (~58°C at night in the
    >
    > house) this
    >
    >>>winter, I have had multiple incidents where the computer will not
    >
    > even go
    >
    >>> > through the BIOS level start up. As soon as I turn on the
    >
    > machine, I get
    >
    >>>a
    >>>series of multiple beeps, then a brief silence, then multiple
    >
    > beeps,
    >
    >>>silence, and then continuous beeps. The computer then does not
    >
    > boot.
    >
    >>>When the air temperature is again above ~62°C, the computer will
    >
    > boot
    >
    >>>and run just fine.
    >>
    >>>Is this expected behavior or is something going wrong (other than
    >>>letting the indoor temperature fall so far).
    >>
    >>I have a Rev. 1 of this same board, and on one occasion this Fall
    >
    > when I
    >
    >>left the windows open one cool, humid night the POST failed the next
    >>morning--except in my case I had no beeps and the PSU clicked as if
    >
    > trying
    >
    >>to reset. The temp never dropped below 68°F in the room, but the
    >
    > humidity
    >
    >>that morning was >95%, and that exceeds the spec on the PSU.
    >>
    >>After I warmed everything up with a hair drier it booted fine and has
    >
    > ever
    >
    >>since, regardless of temperature, but I no longer open the windows to
    >
    > the
    >
    >>office overnight. This may not be your issue, and if your house is
    >
    > heated
    >
    >>the humidity is probably much lower than the maximum spec for the
    >
    > mobo or
    >
    >>PSU, unless you're opening the windows.
    >>
    >>OTOH, you may have some component that is contracting in the cold
    >
    > enough to
    >
    >>cause a poor connection. If that is the case, I doubt if it is
    >
    > something
    >
    >>you could troubleshoot. You might try reseating the CPU, memory, and
    >
    > cards
    >
    >>just for the heck of it, but I doubt if that will change anything.
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.gigabyte (More info?)

    I should have been clearer. I did use a fine brush to loosen the dirt
    while holding the vacuum's nozzle above the computer parts.
    But point well taken for future cleaning. I'll blow off the dust in
    the future.

    Steve
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.gigabyte (More info?)

    The correct solution is to use a special antistatic vacuum cleaner,
    such as 3M's. They are sold through electronic tool catalogs such as
    Jensen Tools (no relation). They are expensive but worth it. They also
    have superfine filters that even vacuum laser printer toner.
    --
    Doug Jensen, jensen@real-time.org
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.gigabyte (More info?)

    The group's discussion of proper cleaning technique has been helpful,
    but can anyone explain why dust can cause electrical problems with the
    system's components. As well, either by their nature or design are
    there particular components in a typical computer that are more
    vulnerable to dust related electrical problems?
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.gigabyte (More info?)

    On 26 Jan 2005 09:01:53 -0800, sgoldstn@ix.netcom.com wrote:

    >The group's discussion of proper cleaning technique has been helpful,
    >but can anyone explain why dust can cause electrical problems with the
    >system's components. As well, either by their nature or design are
    >there particular components in a typical computer that are more
    >vulnerable to dust related electrical problems?


    Well this is quite variable to say the least. We had an old 486
    machine on the factory floor where thermoset plastics were molded
    (lots of dust) When I removed the cover to check the machine out (note
    it was working fine) I found a layer of dust some 50mm think covering
    everything inside I left well alone and as far as I know the machine
    is still working some 2 years later.

    Maybe old machines are just more tolerant.
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.gigabyte (More info?)

    Dust can kill all hardware, why do engineers wair dust protection when they
    are building a sattelite for example, same reason? Dust partikels are that
    large that they can contain Iron (Fe) molecules. One dust partikel isn't
    probably going to hurt your hardware but once the dust deposites get bigger
    and bigger they will be able to make contact at some point, resulting in
    short cuts.

    This is why you should clean all hardware!!

    Each year thousands of people get killed because there TV screen implodes,
    same reason, hardware never gets cleaned and becomes a deadly bomb waiting
    to go off at some time.

    Greetz

    Barabas


    <sgoldstn@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
    news:1106758913.088999.297350@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
    The group's discussion of proper cleaning technique has been helpful,
    but can anyone explain why dust can cause electrical problems with the
    system's components. As well, either by their nature or design are
    there particular components in a typical computer that are more
    vulnerable to dust related electrical problems?
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.gigabyte (More info?)

    I HAVE TWO OF THESE MOTHERBOARDS FOR OVER A YEAR AND THEY BOTH MAKE
    THE SAME BEEPS YOU MENTION. I HAVE HAVE NOT HAD ANY PROBLEM WITH
    THEM.
  14. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.gigabyte (More info?)

    GARYPET wrote:
    > I HAVE TWO OF THESE MOTHERBOARDS FOR OVER A YEAR AND THEY BOTH MAKE
    > THE SAME BEEPS YOU MENTION. I HAVE HAVE NOT HAD ANY PROBLEM WITH
    > THEM.
    >
    Maybe not the same beeps. When my computer got going (before I cleaned
    it out), it would just start the stacatto beeping and would never boot.
  15. Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.gigabyte (More info?)

    "Barabas" <Barabas@pandora.be> wrote in message
    news:a5fKd.6810$OE6.624853@phobos.telenet-ops.be...
    > Dust can kill all hardware, why do engineers wair dust protection when
    > they are building a sattelite for example, same reason? Dust partikels are
    > that large that they can contain Iron (Fe) molecules. One dust partikel
    > isn't probably going to hurt your hardware but once the dust deposites get
    > bigger and bigger they will be able to make contact at some point,
    > resulting in short cuts.
    >
    > This is why you should clean all hardware!!
    >
    > Each year thousands of people get killed because there TV screen implodes,
    > same reason, hardware never gets cleaned and becomes a deadly bomb waiting
    > to go off at some time.
    >
    > Greetz
    >
    > Barabas
    >
    >
    > <sgoldstn@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
    > news:1106758913.088999.297350@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
    > The group's discussion of proper cleaning technique has been helpful,
    > but can anyone explain why dust can cause electrical problems with the
    > system's components. As well, either by their nature or design are
    > there particular components in a typical computer that are more
    > vulnerable to dust related electrical problems?
    >

    Depends on what the 'dust' actually is. Most household dust is dead human
    skin cells, but in certain environments dust may be from a completely
    different source and it's possible the dust could be from a conductive
    material.
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