Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Good Anti Virus and Firewall

Last response: in Windows 7
Share
February 6, 2011 1:28:02 PM

Whats up everyone. My year subscription of my current Suite is up and I'm curious what is a good Anti virus, spy ware, malware, key logger you name it and it will find it software along with a good firewall. I was looking at Bitdefender and Comodo as 2 possible choices. Just seeing if anyone has input for 2011 versions. It doesn't matter if I have to buy it or not so being free doesn't matter to me.
a b $ Windows 7
February 6, 2011 4:57:44 PM

I've been using freeware on my and my family's computers. Firewall: PCTools+ Firewall. Antivirus: MS Security Essentials. They have been working well, and do not consume an inordinate amount of resources.
m
0
l
Related resources
February 6, 2011 6:33:18 PM

Top Free Avs, as rated by PC World.
- http://www.pcworld.com/reviews/collection/5928/2011_fre...
I personally like Avast! and Microsoft Sec. Essentials.

Top Paid AVs, as rated by PC World
- http://www.pcworld.com/reviews/collection/5927/2011_pai...
As for these, BitDefender and Kaspersky are my personal favorites

Top Free Firewall, as rated by Gizmo.
- http://www.techsupportalert.com/best-free-firewall.htm
Comodo tends to be the favorite among most computer techs.
m
0
l
February 6, 2011 7:16:03 PM

Avast, Comodo, Avira, and Zonealarm. Avast and Avira are anti virus only, Zonealarm is a firewall, and Comodo is anti virus and firewall, all free here http://filehippo.com/ I have used them all and they all work great. I would also download Malwarebytes as it will find things that the others wont. It doesnt have any real time scans but if you suspect you have something or your antivirus finds and cleans something this is nice to run just to make sure.
m
0
l
February 6, 2011 7:56:42 PM

AV: Microsoft Security Essentials
Firewall: The built-in Windows one.


Run Malwarebytes as needed and as a precautionary measure.



I've been doing this setup for years and have *never* had an issue.
m
0
l
February 6, 2011 8:18:19 PM

^ I agree the windows firewall is just as good as any third party program if not better.

It also helps if your router has its own firewall.
m
0
l
February 6, 2011 9:07:30 PM

Thanks guys. With switching and using Windows 7 for the first time I was thinking of running a separate firewall and anti virus instead of a suite and was trying to catch up on what all was new. some of them I have never heard of before.
m
0
l
February 6, 2011 9:53:16 PM

In my professional opinion, the Windows firewall is just fine. The third party ones are almost ALWAYS bloatware that doesn't provide any additional benefit. And I can't even count how many times i've seen the third party firewalls "break" (like one out of three zonalarm installs lol) and completely screw up your windows TCP stack and cause you to lose internet/network access.
m
0
l
February 6, 2011 10:28:07 PM

NOD32 for antivirus paid. Avast free edition for, well... free. Windows firewall works fine.
m
0
l
a b $ Windows 7
February 7, 2011 1:53:30 PM

mavroxur said:
In my professional opinion, the Windows firewall is just fine. The third party ones are almost ALWAYS bloatware that doesn't provide any additional benefit. And I can't even count how many times i've seen the third party firewalls "break" (like one out of three zonalarm installs lol) and completely screw up your windows TCP stack and cause you to lose internet/network access.

The windows firewall does its job for incoming hits, but does nothing to stop outgoing software. So it allows any program you have, including trojans and keyloggers, to call home whenever they are triggered to do so. Third-party firewalls' default installation allows you to approve or not approve such software seeking to call home or to take over various services you are running, including the "kernel."
m
0
l
February 7, 2011 2:01:20 PM

^ I agree but as long as you have a decent anti virus, keep it updated and do periodic scans to keep your pc virus free, then you shouldnt have a problem using the windows firewall.
m
0
l
a b $ Windows 7
February 7, 2011 2:19:17 PM

And as long as you stay away from any symantec product also :) 
m
0
l
a b 8 Security
a b è Antivirus
a c 416 $ Windows 7
February 7, 2011 6:52:05 PM

Windows firewall is junk!
m
0
l
a b 8 Security
a b è Antivirus
a c 416 $ Windows 7
February 8, 2011 6:52:39 PM

it's a firewall tester and proves alot and windows built in firewall is one way only...junk!
m
0
l
February 25, 2011 6:54:28 AM

Tried Quick Heal? worked for me got my subscription extended as well for free... it's comparatively cheaper and they are giving extended licences so you can check it out at http://www.quickheal.com
m
0
l
March 1, 2011 1:30:37 AM

In my professional experience and opinion, there are three general groups of people with highly different needs for so called anti-virus (security suites are not just anti-virus or just a firewall). Group 1 - techies who know better (or should) than to go to questionable open websites, emails, links, etc., plus keep up on application vulnerabilities. They may be able to reasonably replicate with a handful of freeware the feature set of a security suite. These people usually are okay, however I wouldn't bet a plug nickel that some have a nasty root kit. If they have kids, they are screwed. Group 2 - people who are not techies, but listen to techies who say that the free anti-virus is all they need. Their computers and especially with kids probably have a half dozen Trojans, loads of spyware and at least one root kit. Viruses are the least of their worries if they had a clue. Group 3 - anyone that does online banking, has an investment portfolio, etc. and especially if technology is not their forte, they need first, a newer machine without resource limitations to run the very best security suite they can afford. For most Norton 360 is hands down the best today (regardless of Symantec haters from ten years ago) simply because it takes care of them without asking them if they want to allow an app to run or not. One person I know said it is simple, I always anwser “no”. If you think that is a good answer, you need Norton 360. Everyone should keep Microsoft apps patched and use Secunia or something similar to ensure other app vulnerabilities are minimized. If you still cannot get past your hatred for Symantec, Kaspersky is close behind them in overall protection.
As for firewalls, Windows Firewall for XP is offers is inbound only protection, Vista and newer are both in and outbound which is relevant because it helps keep malware from “phoning home”. If you actually spend several hundred hours becoming knowledgeable on security risks and solutions today you will know that viruses probably represent 30% of computer infections. Most infections are not viruses per se and are self induced by clicking on the wrong thing, but worms and other means of infection do exist. Most identity theft is still because a person is phished and the more time someone spends on social sites, the more likely they are to be a victim of identity theft. Last, but not least, poor password practices probably cause people more financial loss than any other single cause.
Many websites are false fronts to promote specific products. See US-CERT, SANS for decent perspectives (use more than one still) on security. The BBC tells more about computer threats than anything you will hear in the US. cNet and PC Mag routinely review security software and have proven to myself over time to provide some decent info. Read between the lines, just because the article reports one free anti-virus is best, does not mean they are comparing it to the best security suite. Bottom line - security suites provide protection from numerous threat vectors that just anti-virus and freeware cannot do as well at for the average person.

P.S. If Symantec won't load, and you can't get to Microsoft websites, your machine is already severely infected, do a clean install.
m
0
l
a b $ Windows 7
March 1, 2011 1:32:30 PM

+1^ Excellent observations and assessments.
m
0
l
March 3, 2011 10:03:28 PM

My experience with Norton was that it is not conducive to online gaming other than that I liked it, found Mcaffee was the same

way. At the moment I am using zone alarm security suite, ad-aware by lava soft, spy-bot search and destroy,

SUPErantispyware, Windowsdefender and also a mcaffee plug in on my firefox browser that gives me assessment on websites

now, not sure how much if at all zonealarm may be slowing me down (hard to tell at the moment until I upgrade my power

supply and graphics)... but I do like the fact that I can set trust levels in zone alarm and kill programs permanently or

temporarily. Personally am tempted to go with a high end MAC next time I get a computer... I have heard they are way less

prone to security issues... just not too sure that MAC is fully compatible with my favorite online games.
m
0
l
March 10, 2011 7:29:16 PM

slvryaris said:
Whats up everyone. My year subscription of my current Suite is up and I'm curious what is a good Anti virus, spy ware, malware, key logger you name it and it will find it software along with a good firewall. I was looking at Bitdefender and Comodo as 2 possible choices. Just seeing if anyone has input for 2011 versions. It doesn't matter if I have to buy it or not so being free doesn't matter to me.
.
If you have Windows 7 64 Bit and want some good free software, Microsoft Security Essentials 64 Bit, Kingsoft Antivirus Pro Free, Avira Antivir Personal, Iobit Security 360, and Trend Micro Browser Guard all work well together. Most of these do not consume too much space. I also use Privatefirewall 7.0 (recommended for 64 Bit) for the same reason. Just make sure you install the MSE before any other antivirus program, or you uninstall the other antivirus programs and then start over with Microsoft Security Essentials. Also, if you do not need Windows Live, uninstall that before installing MSE. I have tried many other combinations and some do not work together. Avast, G Data and Vipre are good, but not meant to be installed side-by-side. However, they all automatically shut down Microsoft Security Essentials. G Data is a combination of Avast and BitDefender, and I found it slowed down my computer, especially when it was scanning for viruses. If I wanted to narrow it down further to just two free antivirus programs, I would first install MSE 64 Bit and then Kingsoft (cloud-based) Antivirus Pro Free.

Ricochet_16
m
0
l
March 11, 2011 12:30:58 AM

Ricochet_16 said:
.
If you have Windows 7 64 Bit and want some good free software, Microsoft Security Essentials 64 Bit, Kingsoft Antivirus Pro Free, Avira Antivir Personal, Iobit Security 360, and Trend Micro Browser Guard all work well together. Most of these do not consume too much space. I also use Privatefirewall 7.0 (recommended for 64 Bit) for the same reason. Just make sure you install the MSE before any other antivirus program, or you uninstall the other antivirus programs and then start over with Microsoft Security Essentials. Also, if you do not need Windows Live, uninstall that before installing MSE. I have tried many other combinations and some do not work together. Avast, G Data and Vipre are good, but not meant to be installed side-by-side. However, they all automatically shut down Microsoft Security Essentials. G Data is a combination of Avast and BitDefender, and I found it slowed down my computer, especially when it was scanning for viruses. If I wanted to narrow it down further to just two free antivirus programs, I would first install MSE 64 Bit and then Kingsoft (cloud-based) Antivirus Pro Free.

Ricochet_16


An excerpt from Microsoft Essentials website; "If you use more than one antivirus or antispyware program at the same time, your computer may experience decreased performance, become unstable, or restart unexpectedly. Before you install Microsoft Security Essentials, or to resolve many issues with Security Essentials, including installation issues, you must first completely remove any Internet security programs from your computer as described in this topic."

No expert will recommend the running of two resident anti-virus programs at the same time. If two are running, either you have a problem or one of them is doing nothing.
m
0
l
March 11, 2011 2:23:18 AM

Mg4PNwVFoAs said:
An excerpt from Microsoft Essentials website; "If you use more than one antivirus or antispyware program at the same time, your computer may experience decreased performance, become unstable, or restart unexpectedly. Before you install Microsoft Security Essentials, or to resolve many issues with Security Essentials, including installation issues, you must first completely remove any Internet security programs from your computer as described in this topic."

No expert will recommend the running of two resident anti-virus programs at the same time. If two are running, either you have a problem or one of them is doing nothing.


I was just lucky, after testing many other combinations that did not work, to find this combination that does work perfectly. I have both Windows XP and a Windows 7 64 Bit computers, and now do not use G Data Security, but I use all of the others without a problem. On the XP, I also have Threatfire installed without a problem. Remember, to make Microsoft Security Essentials work, you must install that first. On some computers you might also remove all traces of any other antivirus programs before installing MSE. You confirmed that from the MSE website. Now, to believe that it works, you will just have to try it for yourself. I like layered protection, as long no program interferes with another.

Ricochet_16
m
0
l
March 12, 2011 3:08:28 AM

The combination I have that works consists entirely of freeware. There are a lot of companies that charge for antivirus, antimalware and antispyware with multiple engines.

Some of them include:

- G Data - uses Avast and BitDefender
- Avanquest Double Anti-Spy Professional V2 - uses two engines
- Entensys UserGate Proxy - uses Kapersky and Panda
- Emisisoft Anti-Malware 5.1 - uses Emsisoft Anti-Malware + Ikarus Anti-Virus
- TrustPort Total Protection 2011 - uses BitDefender + AVG
- Free Online Virus Scanner, called NoVirusThanks, uses 24 antivirus engines to scan any file
- Coranti 2010 Multi-Core Antivirus and Antispyware claims to uses top-rated scan engines, such as BitDefender, F-Prot, Norman and Lavasoft
- Another reference to MultiCore Antivirus and Antispyware says their software uses Frisk, Norman, Lavasoft and Sunbelt
- Ashampoo Anti-Malware uses two engines
- OPSWAT's Metascan uses anti-virus egines from 7 different companies - Kapersky Lab, AVG, CA, ESET, VirusBuster, Norman, Clamwin, plus an interface supporting integration with many anti-virus packages a user may already own.

- Finally, Microsoft's Forefront Security for Sharepoint, through their Sharepoint Multiple Engine Manager you can download, claims up to five engines can be configured to work well together:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc298339.asp...

I hope this information is helpful. My combination configured without the use of Sharepoint. With that, however, it might have been possible for me to use other antivirus programs together.

Ricochet_16
m
0
l
March 12, 2011 1:34:36 PM

slvryaris said:
Whats up everyone. My year subscription of my current Suite is up and I'm curious what is a good Anti virus, spy ware, malware, key logger you name it and it will find it software along with a good firewall. I was looking at Bitdefender and Comodo as 2 possible choices. Just seeing if anyone has input for 2011 versions. It doesn't matter if I have to buy it or not so being free doesn't matter to me.


What platform and operating systems are you using? Sometimes that determines the programs that work best on a particular setup. Whether you have XP or 7, 32 or 64 Bit, and Windows, Linux or Mac.

Ricochet_16
m
0
l
March 12, 2011 3:24:23 PM

Ricochet_16 said:
The combination I have that works consists entirely of freeware. There are a lot of companies that charge for antivirus, antimalware and antispyware with multiple engines.

Some of them include:

- G Data - uses Avast and BitDefender
- Avanquest Double Anti-Spy Professional V2 - uses two engines
- Entensys UserGate Proxy - uses Kapersky and Panda
- Emisisoft Anti-Malware 5.1 - uses Emsisoft Anti-Malware + Ikarus Anti-Virus
- TrustPort Total Protection 2011 - uses BitDefender + AVG
- Free Online Virus Scanner, called NoVirusThanks, uses 24 antivirus engines to scan any file
- Coranti 2010 Multi-Core Antivirus and Antispyware claims to uses top-rated scan engines, such as BitDefender, F-Prot, Norman and Lavasoft
- Another reference to MultiCore Antivirus and Antispyware says their software uses Frisk, Norman, Lavasoft and Sunbelt
- Ashampoo Anti-Malware uses two engines
- OPSWAT's Metascan uses anti-virus egines from 7 different companies - Kapersky Lab, AVG, CA, ESET, VirusBuster, Norman, Clamwin, plus an interface supporting integration with many anti-virus packages a user may already own.

- Finally, Microsoft's Forefront Security for Sharepoint, through their Sharepoint Multiple Engine Manager you can download, claims up to five engines can be configured to work well together:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc298339.asp...

I hope this information is helpful. My combination configured without the use of Sharepoint. With that, however, it might have been possible for me to use other antivirus programs together.

Ricochet_16


Hey Ricochet - Excellent point, now I see where the conflict in opinion is. Please research the difference passive versus active, scan versus resident in memory, etc. Many experts will agree that using multiple different programs to scan is a good thing. Having multiple different security programs actively running (not just scanning) at the same time is considered a bad idea. Security suites / antivirus programs try to block stuff before it gets to the hard drive. They also from time to time scan. Scanners only scan what is already stored.
m
0
l
March 12, 2011 5:50:17 PM

I wish I had the expertise to do all of that. However, of the antivirus programs that I tried, I found that Vipre, G Data and Avast worked very well as standalone programs, but they shut down my Microsoft Security Essentials, which I like to use. Also, G Data was too large and slowed down my XP computer, especially while scanning. The Avanquest Double Anti-Spy Professional V2 shut down my internet connection on my XP computer, so I had to use a Microsoft FixIt tool to correct my WinSock settings, after uninstalling Avanquest. I finally received a refund from Avanquest after a couple of weeks of trying to convince them that I was unhappy with their multi-engine software.

Although Microsoft did not mention it, I would imagine their Sharepoint Multiple Engine Manager would only work in configuring multiple standalone programs working together, rather than several multi-engine programs. It would be interesting to know exactly how it works. If anyone wants to try it, report back your results.

Ricochet_16
m
0
l
March 12, 2011 10:40:58 PM

Im using Kaspersky and it is a solid virus scanner+firewall, it even has an adblocker which is pretty good at stopping youtube,ustream,justin tv ads.
m
0
l
March 13, 2011 8:54:56 AM

There is no best antivirus or good antivirus. There is only complementary sollutions I am afraid. Every month I scan with different antiviruses: Avira, Avg, Bitdefender, kaspersky.

I use as Avira antivirus monitor for low resources requirments. I also use antispywares: adaware, Spysweper, Flobo System Repair and Spyboot.

Is true, Avira has a bug. When using microtorrent program for many hours, is causing a 100% processor, but I simply shut down it. :) 
m
0
l
March 13, 2011 5:13:58 PM

Mg4PNwVFoAs said:
In my professional experience and opinion, there are three general groups of people with highly different needs for so called anti-virus (security suites are not just anti-virus or just a firewall). Group 1 - techies who know better (or should) than to go to questionable open websites, emails, links, etc., plus keep up on application vulnerabilities. They may be able to reasonably replicate with a handful of freeware the feature set of a security suite. These people usually are okay, however I wouldn't bet a plug nickel that some have a nasty root kit. If they have kids, they are screwed. Group 2 - people who are not techies, but listen to techies who say that the free anti-virus is all they need. Their computers and especially with kids probably have a half dozen Trojans, loads of spyware and at least one root kit. Viruses are the least of their worries if they had a clue. Group 3 - anyone that does online banking, has an investment portfolio, etc. and especially if technology is not their forte, they need first, a newer machine without resource limitations to run the very best security suite they can afford. For most Norton 360 is hands down the best today (regardless of Symantec haters from ten years ago) simply because it takes care of them without asking them if they want to allow an app to run or not. One person I know said it is simple, I always anwser “no”. If you think that is a good answer, you need Norton 360. Everyone should keep Microsoft apps patched and use Secunia or something similar to ensure other app vulnerabilities are minimized. If you still cannot get past your hatred for Symantec, Kaspersky is close behind them in overall protection.
As for firewalls, Windows Firewall for XP is offers is inbound only protection, Vista and newer are both in and outbound which is relevant because it helps keep malware from “phoning home”. If you actually spend several hundred hours becoming knowledgeable on security risks and solutions today you will know that viruses probably represent 30% of computer infections. Most infections are not viruses per se and are self induced by clicking on the wrong thing, but worms and other means of infection do exist. Most identity theft is still because a person is phished and the more time someone spends on social sites, the more likely they are to be a victim of identity theft. Last, but not least, poor password practices probably cause people more financial loss than any other single cause.
Many websites are false fronts to promote specific products. See US-CERT, SANS for decent perspectives (use more than one still) on security. The BBC tells more about computer threats than anything you will hear in the US. cNet and PC Mag routinely review security software and have proven to myself over time to provide some decent info. Read between the lines, just because the article reports one free anti-virus is best, does not mean they are comparing it to the best security suite. Bottom line - security suites provide protection from numerous threat vectors that just anti-virus and freeware cannot do as well at for the average person.

P.S. If Symantec won't load, and you can't get to Microsoft websites, your machine is already severely infected, do a clean install.


Thanks for the good advice.

Ricochet_16
m
0
l
March 15, 2011 6:04:47 AM

BitDefender Antivirus Pro 2011 is loaded with features that you'd normally find only in a full suite, most notable its superb phishing protection. It offers three distinct UI views and tons of configuration option
m
0
l
March 27, 2011 10:01:55 PM

mavroxur said:
AV: Microsoft Security Essentials
Firewall: The built-in Windows one.


Run Malwarebytes as needed and as a precautionary measure.



I've been doing this setup for years and have *never* had an issue.


not sure how u've been doing this for years when MS essentials has only been out for a short time with windows 7 since 2009... but, it is a pretty descent choice...

AV: Avast Free
Firewall: built-in windows one.

also use malwarebytes as needed, and i purchased registry patrol to fix registry errors that happen over time with all windows machines...
m
0
l
!