Epson vs Canon

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Has anyone had experience of both? I notice (after reading a review) that
the 'R' series also has 8 colours, but has lost the PC and PM in favour of
an extra black, red and *blue* - and a 'gloss optimiser". The i9950 (which I
have) still has PC and PM and the addition of red and *green*. Every review
I've read has rated the Canon over the Epson (this was the i990 vs the
R800). Does blue make a difference to green and what does the 'gloss
optimiser' do? After all, if you want gloss you simply use glossy media,
surely?! Or am I missing something?
16 answers Last reply
More about epson canon
  1. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    This doesn't directly address your question about the difference between the
    Canon i9x series and the Epson R800, but the major difference between Canon
    and Epson is that the latter has some models that produce excellent results
    printing photos using archival pigment-based inks. Check out the Epson 2200.
    Canon has nothing comparable, since all Canon consumer photo printers use
    dye-based inks.
    "Miss Perspicacia Tick" <misstick@lancre.dw> wrote in message
    news:MC_Cc.148$pP1.111@fe48.usenetserver.com...
    > Has anyone had experience of both? I notice (after reading a review) that
    > the 'R' series also has 8 colours, but has lost the PC and PM in favour of
    > an extra black, red and *blue* - and a 'gloss optimiser". The i9950 (which
    I
    > have) still has PC and PM and the addition of red and *green*. Every
    review
    > I've read has rated the Canon over the Epson (this was the i990 vs the
    > R800). Does blue make a difference to green and what does the 'gloss
    > optimiser' do? After all, if you want gloss you simply use glossy media,
    > surely?! Or am I missing something?
    >
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Miss Perspicacia Tick" <misstick@lancre.dw> wrote:

    >Has anyone had experience of both? I notice (after reading a review) that
    >the 'R' series also has 8 colours, but has lost the PC and PM in favour of
    >an extra black, red and *blue* - and a 'gloss optimiser". The i9950 (which I
    >have) still has PC and PM and the addition of red and *green*. Every review
    >I've read has rated the Canon over the Epson (this was the i990 vs the
    >R800). Does blue make a difference to green and what does the 'gloss
    >optimiser' do? After all, if you want gloss you simply use glossy media,
    >surely?! Or am I missing something?
    >
    >

    Yes you are dear.
    Surely you wouldn't settle for just glossy when you could have
    "glossier"? It's for those who feel absolutes won't do and would like
    something stronger. Like Starbucks and the "grande" size which normal
    people would call small but "small" sounds so, well, small.
  3. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    I believe the gloss optimizer is used in the Epson 2200 because that printer
    uses pigment inks, which don't look glossy otherwise. That was a problem for
    consumers that wanted glossy prints and the optimizer was offered to solve
    it.
    Lola MacLean
  4. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    If you are happy with what you are getting then there is nothing to worry
    about. As noted the Epson pigment printers unaided do not achieve the high
    gloss finish that many printers desire so the printer adds a glossy finish.
    Canon printers and Canon glossy papers achieve beautiful glossy results. How
    concerned to be about archival results for ink-based prints I suppose may be
    a real concern if you are selling the prints but chemical based color prints
    do not last forever and neither do their owners. Alas I have but ink-based
    Canon and Epson printers: all three of us can only expect limited mortality.
  5. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    There is a reason for the gloss optimizer. Epson's R800 uses pigmented
    inks. The advantage of pigmented inks, as of right now, is that they
    are more permanent and less likely to fade than dye inks. That may
    change over the next year or two as new inks and papers hit the market.
    The problem with pigments is they tend to dry a bit more matte than most
    would like, even on glossy papers. And areas with high ink coverage
    even on glossy paper, will show the ink as flat. It looks even worse if
    you look at the image at an angle, with light reflecting on it. The
    gloss optimizer coats the ink areas to make them as glossy as the areas
    that are not covered in ink. The two blacks are because for matte
    papers, a denser black is needed and it is usually very matte. Using a
    second black which is more glossy, but less dense, works better on
    glossy papers.

    What the best ink color combinations are to give highest accuracy is
    often in debate, and it does depend upon the type of inks (dye versus
    pigment) and the type of color management and drivers used. With
    pigmented inks, particularly, since they are not fully transparent,
    mixing certain ink colors may not provide the purity of color that a dye
    ink might. Mixing yellow and magenta pigmented inks may not make as
    pure a red as a pure red pigment. Same with blue, which is normally
    made from cyan and magenta inks.

    In the case of dye inks, getting a good range of greens, especially
    deeper forest greens, which require cyan, magenta, yellow and black in
    varying amounts are tricky to get, so some manufacturers use green.
    Some commercial ink sets add orange.

    At the end, what colors are in the set is not really important to the
    end user. It's sausage making. What you should care about is how good
    the output looks, what variety of papers work with the inks, how much it
    costs per print, how fast the printer is, how reliable the printer is,
    and, if it matters to you, how long the print is likely to last.

    Art


    Rob wrote:

    > "Miss Perspicacia Tick" <misstick@lancre.dw> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Has anyone had experience of both? I notice (after reading a review) that
    >>the 'R' series also has 8 colours, but has lost the PC and PM in favour of
    >>an extra black, red and *blue* - and a 'gloss optimiser". The i9950 (which I
    >>have) still has PC and PM and the addition of red and *green*. Every review
    >>I've read has rated the Canon over the Epson (this was the i990 vs the
    >>R800). Does blue make a difference to green and what does the 'gloss
    >>optimiser' do? After all, if you want gloss you simply use glossy media,
    >>surely?! Or am I missing something?
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    > Yes you are dear.
    > Surely you wouldn't settle for just glossy when you could have
    > "glossier"? It's for those who feel absolutes won't do and would like
    > something stronger. Like Starbucks and the "grande" size which normal
    > people would call small but "small" sounds so, well, small.
  6. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Fri, 25 Jun 2004 20:24:08 -0700, "Lola MacLean"
    <lmmaclean@removespamfreeadelphia.net> wrote:

    >I believe the gloss optimizer is used in the Epson 2200 because that printer
    >uses pigment inks, which don't look glossy otherwise. That was a problem for
    >consumers that wanted glossy prints and the optimizer was offered to solve
    >it.
    >Lola MacLean
    >
    There is no gloss optimiser for the 2100/2200, only the R800.

    --

    Hecate
    Hecate@newsguy.com
    veni, vidi, reliqui
  7. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Fri, 25 Jun 2004 21:05:58 -0600, "Bill Mathews"
    <bmatthews8@comcast.net> wrote:

    >This doesn't directly address your question about the difference between the
    >Canon i9x series and the Epson R800, but the major difference between Canon
    >and Epson is that the latter has some models that produce excellent results
    >printing photos using archival pigment-based inks. Check out the Epson 2200.
    >Canon has nothing comparable, since all Canon consumer photo printers use
    >dye-based inks.


    This always causes me to have doubts about my Canon printer.

    It seems as though Canon is mostly concerned with droplet size and
    Epson has bigger droplets but more permanant ink.

    I would like to see a visual demonstration of what really happens when
    the prints get wet, as Epson describes on their radio ads.
  8. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    << From: A@nospam.net (Al)
    Date: Sun, Jun 27, 2004 4:20 AM
    Message-id: <40de9116.4385887@news.mr.net>

    On Fri, 25 Jun 2004 21:05:58 -0600, "Bill Mathews"
    <bmatthews8@comcast.net> wrote:

    >This doesn't directly address your question about the difference between the
    >Canon i9x series and the Epson R800, but the major difference between Canon
    >and Epson is that the latter has some models that produce excellent results
    >printing photos using archival pigment-based inks. Check out the Epson 2200.
    >Canon has nothing comparable, since all Canon consumer photo printers use
    >dye-based inks.


    This always causes me to have doubts about my Canon printer.

    It seems as though Canon is mostly concerned with droplet size and
    Epson has bigger droplets but more permanant ink.

    I would like to see a visual demonstration of what really happens when
    the prints get wet, as Epson describes on their radio ads.
    >>


    I have a Canon S900 which prints great pictures. I used to have an Epson but
    switched mainly because of speed concerns. I don't know about wet prints from
    the larger Pigment ink Epson models but I can tell you that those from my new
    Epson 4X6 PictureMate, seem to be impervious to moisture Test I made:

    print picture. Immediately place under running water and rub with finger while
    doing so. Nothing happened except that the paper, being wet, curled a little
    when it dried. Very impressive indeed. Same results were obtained from someone
    doing an online review of this printer. That is why I tried it also to see if
    the reviewer was nuts.
  9. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    >> Test I made: print picture. Immediately place under running water and rub
    with finger while doing so. Nothing happened except that the paper, being
    wet, curled a little <<

    Interesting. FWIW, I use a Canon i950 and have performed the same test using
    both Red River and Office Depot papers and have gotten the same results.


    "FredBillie" <fredbillie@aol.comnospam> wrote in message
    news:20040628045058.19052.00000790@mb-m06.aol.com
    >> << From: A@nospam.net (Al)
    >> Date: Sun, Jun 27, 2004 4:20 AM
    >> Message-id: <40de9116.4385887@news.mr.net>
    >>
    >> On Fri, 25 Jun 2004 21:05:58 -0600, "Bill Mathews"
    >> <bmatthews8@comcast.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>> This doesn't directly address your question about the difference
    >>> between the Canon i9x series and the Epson R800, but the major
    >>> difference between Canon and Epson is that the latter has some
    >>> models that produce excellent results printing photos using
    >>> archival pigment-based inks. Check out the Epson 2200. Canon has
    >>> nothing comparable, since all Canon consumer photo printers use
    >>> dye-based inks.
    >>
    >>
    >> This always causes me to have doubts about my Canon printer.
    >>
    >> It seems as though Canon is mostly concerned with droplet size and
    >> Epson has bigger droplets but more permanant ink.
    >>
    >> I would like to see a visual demonstration of what really happens
    >> when
    >> the prints get wet, as Epson describes on their radio ads.
    >> >>


    >> I have a Canon S900 which prints great pictures. I used to have an
    >> Epson but switched mainly because of speed concerns. I don't know
    >> about wet prints from the larger Pigment ink Epson models but I can
    >> tell you that those from my new Epson 4X6 PictureMate, seem to be
    >> impervious to moisture Test I made:
    >>
    >> print picture. Immediately place under running water and rub with
    >> finger while doing so. Nothing happened except that the paper, being
    >> wet, curled a little when it dried. Very impressive indeed. Same
    >> results were obtained from someone doing an online review of this
    >> printer. That is why I tried it also to see if the reviewer was nuts.

    --
    Colonel Blip
    colonel.blip@nospambigfoot.com
    Remove "nospam" when replying.
    __________________________________


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  10. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    Epson has the smallest ink droplet size of any printer and it truly is
    waterproof. I have been given a print to run under water at the store.


    "Al" <A@nospam.net> wrote in message news:40de9116.4385887@news.mr.net...
    > On Fri, 25 Jun 2004 21:05:58 -0600, "Bill Mathews"
    > <bmatthews8@comcast.net> wrote:
    >
    > >This doesn't directly address your question about the difference between
    the
    > >Canon i9x series and the Epson R800, but the major difference between
    Canon
    > >and Epson is that the latter has some models that produce excellent
    results
    > >printing photos using archival pigment-based inks. Check out the Epson
    2200.
    > >Canon has nothing comparable, since all Canon consumer photo printers use
    > >dye-based inks.
    >
    >
    > This always causes me to have doubts about my Canon printer.
    >
    > It seems as though Canon is mostly concerned with droplet size and
    > Epson has bigger droplets but more permanant ink.
    >
    > I would like to see a visual demonstration of what really happens when
    > the prints get wet, as Epson describes on their radio ads.
  11. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "bmoag" <aetoo@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:<Ky6Dc.78153$Kz6.62829@newssvr29.news.prodigy.com>...
    > If you are happy with what you are getting then there is nothing to worry
    > about. As noted the Epson pigment printers unaided do not achieve the high
    > gloss finish that many printers desire so the printer adds a glossy finish.
    > Canon printers and Canon glossy papers achieve beautiful glossy results. How
    > concerned to be about archival results for ink-based prints I suppose may be
    > a real concern if you are selling the prints but chemical based color prints
    > do not last forever and neither do their owners. Alas I have but ink-based
    > Canon and Epson printers: all three of us can only expect limited mortality.


    I have some for every body to take a look

    Canon MultiPASS F60 Color Photo Printer/Copier/Scanner
    http://www.tigerdirect.com $100
    Functions: Printer, copier, and scanner
    Print speed: 20 ppm black, 13 ppm color
    Print resolution: 600 x 600 dpi (black), 2,400 x 1,200 dpi (color)
    Nozzle configuration:?
    4 Print cartridges: BCI-3eBk Black ink tank, BCI-3eC Cyan ink tank,
    BCI-3eM Magenta ink tank, BCI-3eY Yellow ink tank

    Canon i560 Desktop Photo Printer amazon $90
    Print speed: Black: 22ppm Color: 15ppm Borderless 4" x 6" photo in 50 seconds
    Print resolution: Up to 4800 by 1200 color dpi, 600 x 600 dpi black
    Nozzles: Black: 320; Color: 512 x 2 (C, M), 256 (Y)
    4 Print cartridges: BCI-6C Cyan ink tank, BCI-6M Magenta ink tank, BCI-6Y
    Yellow ink tank, BCI-3eBk Black ink tank

    Canon i850 Photo Printer amazon $99.99
    Print speed: 22 ppm black, 14 ppm color
    Print resolution: Up to 4800 by 1200 color dpi, 600 x 600 dpi black
    Nozzle configuration: Black: 320 black; color: 512 x 2 (C, M), 256 (Y)
    4 Print cartriges: Ink tanks: BCI-3eC (cyan), BCI-3eM (magenta), BCI-3eY
    (yellow), BCI-3eBk (black)

    Canon i860 Photo Printer amazon $119
    Print speed: Black: 23 ppm (approximately 2.6 seconds per page); Color: 16
    ppm(approximately 3.8 seconds per page); 4" x 6" Borderless Photo: in
    approximately 50 seconds
    Print resolution: Up to 4800 by 1200 color dpi, 600 x 600 dpi black
    Nozzles: Black: 320; Color: 512 x 2 (C,M) and 256 x 2 (Y, Bk)
    5 Print cartridges: BCI-6Bk Black ink tank, BCI-3eBk Black ink tank, BCI-6C
    Cyan ink tank, BCI-6M Magenta ink tank, BCI-6Y Yellow ink tank

    Canon i960 Photo Printer amazon $155
    Print speed:?
    Print resolution: Up to 4800 by 1200 color dpi
    Nozzle configuration:?
    6 Print cartridges: BCI-6Bk Black ink tank, BCI-6PC Photo Cyan ink tank, BCI-
    6PM Photo Magenta ink tank, BCI-6C Cyan ink tank, BCI-6M Magenta ink tank,
    BCI-6Y Yellow ink tank

    Canon i9100 Photo Printer amazon $280
    Print speed: 4 x 6-inch color photo: approximately 37 seconds (borderless);
    8 x 10-inch color photo: approximately 1 minute (borderless)
    Print resolution: Up to 4,800 by 1,200 dpi (color and black)
    Nozzle configuration: 3,072 nozzles (512 x 6 colors)
    6 Print cartriges: BCI-6Bk black ink tank, BCI-6C cyan ink tank, BCI-6M
    magenta ink tank, BCI-6Y yellow ink tank, BCI-6PC Photo Cyan ink tank,
    BCI-6PM Photo magenta ink tank

    Canon i9900 Photo Printer amazon $479
    Color photo print speed: 4 x 6 inch borderless photo in approximately
    38 seconds
    Print resolution: Up to 4800 x 2400 dpi. Resolution may vary based on
    printer driver setting. Maximum resolution of 4800 x 1200 dpi used
    at the bottom edge of the page
    Nozzle configuration: 768 x 8 nozzles for color (C, M, Y, Bk, PC, PM, R, G)
    8 Print cartridges: BCI-6C Cyan, BCI-6M Magenta, BCI-6Y Yellow,
    BCI-6Bk Black, BCI-6PC Photo Cyan, BCI-6PM Photo Magenta, BCI-6R Red
    and BCI-6G Green





    Epson Stylus Photo R300 Inkjet Printer Amazon.com Price: $200
    Print speed: 15 ppm draft mode; 37 seconds for 4 x 6" photo; 77 seconds
    for 8 x 10" photo
    Print resolution: Up to 5760 x 1440 optimized dpi
    Nozzle configuration: 90 nozzles x 6 (CcMmYK)
    6 Print cartridges


    Epson Stylus Photo R800 Inkjet Printer Amazon.com Price: $400
    Print speed: Up to 17 ppm; 5x7" photo in 45 seconds
    Print resolution: Up to 5760 x 1440 optimized dpi (1.5pmd)
    Nozzle configuration: 180 nozzles per cartridge
    6 Print cartridges (Cyan, Magenta,Yellow, Photo Black or Matte Black, Red,
    and Blue) Ink type: Epson UltraChrome Hi-Gloss Ink

    Epson Stylus Photo 2200 Inkjet Printer Amazon.com Price: $600
    Print speed: Up to ?
    Print resolution: Up to 2880 x 1440 optimized dpi (1.5pmd)
    Nozzle configuration: ?
    7 Print cartridges


    print resolution is the number of dot in one square in
    who ever have number dot higher mean better picture ( but the nozzle is clog
    up easier )
    who ever have more Print cartridges mean better picture

    who ever have more Nozzle configuration mean faster it can print

    if you have money then stick with original ink ( ink type can be different
    and it could damage your print head )
    if not buy cheaper print and use refill cartridges
    like me I have canon f60 I love it ( $100 ) 7 months
  12. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Mon, 28 Jun 2004 21:37:49 GMT, "Safetymom123"
    <safetymom123@prodigy.net> wrote:

    >Epson has the smallest ink droplet size of any printer and it truly is
    >waterproof. I have been given a print to run under water at the store.


    Because of your advice I am looking at the Epson C84 to replace my
    Canon i350.

    One thing I don't know about the C84 is that they list two black ink
    cartridge replacements - standard and high capacity. Do both black
    cartridges need to be installed at the same time or is it an option of
    one or the other?
  13. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    On Wed, 30 Jun 2004 10:19:47 GMT, A@nospam.net (Al) wrote:

    >On Mon, 28 Jun 2004 21:37:49 GMT, "Safetymom123"
    ><safetymom123@prodigy.net> wrote:
    >
    >>Epson has the smallest ink droplet size of any printer and it truly is
    >>waterproof. I have been given a print to run under water at the store.
    >
    >
    >Because of your advice I am looking at the Epson C84 to replace my
    >Canon i350.
    >
    >One thing I don't know about the C84 is that they list two black ink
    >cartridge replacements - standard and high capacity. Do both black
    >cartridges need to be installed at the same time or is it an option of
    >one or the other?

    One or the other. It depends on how much printing you do.

    --

    Hecate
    Hecate@newsguy.com
    veni, vidi, reliqui
  14. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    More nozzles are used in thermal printing so that when one set of nozzles is
    cooling the other set is printing. Epson doesn't use heat so it doesn't
    need more nozzles.


    "henry" <the9duong9@wmconnect.com> wrote in message
    news:5b3a46f1.0406290119.4765aef0@posting.google.com...
    > "bmoag" <aetoo@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:<Ky6Dc.78153$Kz6.62829@newssvr29.news.prodigy.com>...
    > > If you are happy with what you are getting then there is nothing to
    worry
    > > about. As noted the Epson pigment printers unaided do not achieve the
    high
    > > gloss finish that many printers desire so the printer adds a glossy
    finish.
    > > Canon printers and Canon glossy papers achieve beautiful glossy results.
    How
    > > concerned to be about archival results for ink-based prints I suppose
    may be
    > > a real concern if you are selling the prints but chemical based color
    prints
    > > do not last forever and neither do their owners. Alas I have but
    ink-based
    > > Canon and Epson printers: all three of us can only expect limited
    mortality.
    >
    >
    >
    > I have some for every body to take a look
    >
    > Canon MultiPASS F60 Color Photo Printer/Copier/Scanner
    > http://www.tigerdirect.com $100
    > Functions: Printer, copier, and scanner
    > Print speed: 20 ppm black, 13 ppm color
    > Print resolution: 600 x 600 dpi (black), 2,400 x 1,200 dpi (color)
    > Nozzle configuration:?
    > 4 Print cartridges: BCI-3eBk Black ink tank, BCI-3eC Cyan ink tank,
    > BCI-3eM Magenta ink tank, BCI-3eY Yellow ink tank
    >
    > Canon i560 Desktop Photo Printer amazon $90
    > Print speed: Black: 22ppm Color: 15ppm Borderless 4" x 6" photo in 50
    seconds
    > Print resolution: Up to 4800 by 1200 color dpi, 600 x 600 dpi black
    > Nozzles: Black: 320; Color: 512 x 2 (C, M), 256 (Y)
    > 4 Print cartridges: BCI-6C Cyan ink tank, BCI-6M Magenta ink tank, BCI-6Y
    > Yellow ink tank, BCI-3eBk Black ink tank
    >
    > Canon i850 Photo Printer amazon $99.99
    > Print speed: 22 ppm black, 14 ppm color
    > Print resolution: Up to 4800 by 1200 color dpi, 600 x 600 dpi black
    > Nozzle configuration: Black: 320 black; color: 512 x 2 (C, M), 256 (Y)
    > 4 Print cartriges: Ink tanks: BCI-3eC (cyan), BCI-3eM (magenta), BCI-3eY
    > (yellow), BCI-3eBk (black)
    >
    > Canon i860 Photo Printer amazon $119
    > Print speed: Black: 23 ppm (approximately 2.6 seconds per page); Color: 16
    > ppm(approximately 3.8 seconds per page); 4" x 6" Borderless Photo: in
    > approximately 50 seconds
    > Print resolution: Up to 4800 by 1200 color dpi, 600 x 600 dpi black
    > Nozzles: Black: 320; Color: 512 x 2 (C,M) and 256 x 2 (Y, Bk)
    > 5 Print cartridges: BCI-6Bk Black ink tank, BCI-3eBk Black ink tank,
    BCI-6C
    > Cyan ink tank, BCI-6M Magenta ink tank, BCI-6Y Yellow ink tank
    >
    > Canon i960 Photo Printer amazon $155
    > Print speed:?
    > Print resolution: Up to 4800 by 1200 color dpi
    > Nozzle configuration:?
    > 6 Print cartridges: BCI-6Bk Black ink tank, BCI-6PC Photo Cyan ink tank,
    BCI-
    > 6PM Photo Magenta ink tank, BCI-6C Cyan ink tank, BCI-6M Magenta ink
    tank,
    > BCI-6Y Yellow ink tank
    >
    > Canon i9100 Photo Printer amazon $280
    > Print speed: 4 x 6-inch color photo: approximately 37 seconds
    (borderless);
    > 8 x 10-inch color photo: approximately 1 minute (borderless)
    > Print resolution: Up to 4,800 by 1,200 dpi (color and black)
    > Nozzle configuration: 3,072 nozzles (512 x 6 colors)
    > 6 Print cartriges: BCI-6Bk black ink tank, BCI-6C cyan ink tank, BCI-6M
    > magenta ink tank, BCI-6Y yellow ink tank, BCI-6PC Photo Cyan ink tank,
    > BCI-6PM Photo magenta ink tank
    >
    > Canon i9900 Photo Printer amazon $479
    > Color photo print speed: 4 x 6 inch borderless photo in approximately
    > 38 seconds
    > Print resolution: Up to 4800 x 2400 dpi. Resolution may vary based on
    > printer driver setting. Maximum resolution of 4800 x 1200 dpi used
    > at the bottom edge of the page
    > Nozzle configuration: 768 x 8 nozzles for color (C, M, Y, Bk, PC, PM, R,
    G)
    > 8 Print cartridges: BCI-6C Cyan, BCI-6M Magenta, BCI-6Y Yellow,
    > BCI-6Bk Black, BCI-6PC Photo Cyan, BCI-6PM Photo Magenta, BCI-6R Red
    > and BCI-6G Green
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Epson Stylus Photo R300 Inkjet Printer Amazon.com Price: $200
    > Print speed: 15 ppm draft mode; 37 seconds for 4 x 6" photo; 77 seconds
    > for 8 x 10" photo
    > Print resolution: Up to 5760 x 1440 optimized dpi
    > Nozzle configuration: 90 nozzles x 6 (CcMmYK)
    > 6 Print cartridges
    >
    >
    > Epson Stylus Photo R800 Inkjet Printer Amazon.com Price: $400
    > Print speed: Up to 17 ppm; 5x7" photo in 45 seconds
    > Print resolution: Up to 5760 x 1440 optimized dpi (1.5pmd)
    > Nozzle configuration: 180 nozzles per cartridge
    > 6 Print cartridges (Cyan, Magenta,Yellow, Photo Black or Matte Black, Red,
    > and Blue) Ink type: Epson UltraChrome Hi-Gloss Ink
    >
    > Epson Stylus Photo 2200 Inkjet Printer Amazon.com Price: $600
    > Print speed: Up to ?
    > Print resolution: Up to 2880 x 1440 optimized dpi (1.5pmd)
    > Nozzle configuration: ?
    > 7 Print cartridges
    >
    >
    > print resolution is the number of dot in one square in
    > who ever have number dot higher mean better picture ( but the nozzle is
    clog
    > up easier )
    > who ever have more Print cartridges mean better picture
    >
    > who ever have more Nozzle configuration mean faster it can print
    >
    > if you have money then stick with original ink ( ink type can be different
    > and it could damage your print head )
    > if not buy cheaper print and use refill cartridges
    > like me I have canon f60 I love it ( $100 ) 7 months
  15. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Safetymom123" <safetymom123@prodigy.net> wrote in message
    news:jXTEc.120$V65.50@newssvr15.news.prodigy.com...
    > More nozzles are used in thermal printing so that when one set of nozzles is
    > cooling the other set is printing. Epson doesn't use heat so it doesn't
    > need more nozzles.

    This is a truly bizarre suggestion.

    The firing frequency of a printhead is typically limited by fluidics, the time
    it takes to refill the firing chamber. You could design a print with one
    nozzle per color, but it would taka a very long time since printing an inch at
    1200 dpi would take 1200 passes of the printhead. A print with a 600 dpi swath
    1" high (600 nozzles) would print a 1200 dpi swath in two passes of the print.
    In general the more nozzles the faster printing will be, all else being equal.
    Smaller drops will require more drop firings to cover a given area at a given
    ink flux.

    - Bob Headrick, not speaking for my employer HP
  16. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

    "Miss Perspicacia Tick" <misstick@lancre.dw> wrote:
    >
    >Has anyone had experience of both? I notice (after reading a review) that
    >the 'R' series also has 8 colours, but has lost the PC and PM in favour of
    >an extra black, red and *blue* - and a 'gloss optimiser". The i9950 (which I
    >have) still has PC and PM and the addition of red and *green*. Every review
    >I've read has rated the Canon over the Epson (this was the i990 vs the
    >R800). Does blue make a difference to green and what does the 'gloss
    >optimiser' do? After all, if you want gloss you simply use glossy media,
    >surely?! Or am I missing something?

    Jumping in VERY late here I see that the old Canon versus Epson wars
    are still going strong.

    You say every review? Really? Did you read the fine print in these
    reviews? Was print longevity taken in to account? That is a
    rhetorical question since, if what you say were true, it could not
    have been. I realize that many here do not really care if their
    prints last that long and are willing to reprint etc. That is fine,
    but seems very odd to me considering that it DOUBLES the cost of
    printing and everyone here seems to hate the high costs of print
    supplies. Others seem happy to spray their prints for added
    longevity. I say whatever floats your boat! However, why not buy a
    printer that rates at the top AND makes prints that your grandchildren
    will be able to enjoy by showing their children how our generation
    looked? I know I really enjoy our old family photos.

    Check out the reviews of the R800 and i990 at
    http://www.photo-i.co.uk/. They give the Epson R800 an overall score
    of "96.6% Highly Recommended" and, while they give the Canon
    i990/i9950 a Rating of "96 - A superb printer - highly recommended".
    It seems like a pretty close match to me as have other reviews I have
    read. However, they ALSO say:

    "One problem which Canon must address is print fade. There have been
    many posts on the photo-i forum and other site forums from people who
    are having serious problems with this. Most of these can be put down
    to not displaying or storing prints properly. I have had prints
    created with my S900 and even the 8200 which have been on display for
    a couple or more years and they still look fresh. I also have some
    prints which have been pinned up in the kitchen which have faded badly
    in less than two months. I know Canon have done a silent upgrade to
    their media and have improved the coating etc. (the new stock is
    watermarked on the back), I think they could be doing much more on
    this. The reason I mention this, is because there are going to be many
    serious photographers who will want to exhibit their work and
    ultimately even sell their pictures. The i9950 will provide all the
    quality that is necessary, but this needs to be backed up with stable
    long lasting media."

    I see some here who claim they have no problem with their photos
    lasting. I also have seen 200+ pound women in spandex pants and thong
    bathing suits so forgive me if I do not accept the judgement of the
    average user. ;^) I do not recall any who have said their pictures
    last more than a few years even when stored in an album. They
    CERTAINLY will not last 50 to 70 or more years that the Epson will.
    Enjoy your Canon printers, they do print beautifully, but so do Epson
    and their pictures will last!
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