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Should you use a surge protector w/ DSL and Cable?

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Anonymous
January 9, 2005 7:22:02 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I am checking on high-speed and looking into my options and trying to
understand how to set it up. One question is that I currently have a Belkin
Surgemaster Protector that includes cable and DSL protection. Is it a
good idea to use it? Does it impact performance in any way? Should it be
placed between the wall jack and the splitter?

Thanks for any help you can provide!
Anonymous
January 9, 2005 7:22:03 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Mark

Run from the wall jack into the surge protector and then into your
splitter.. for the minimal drop in performance, if any at all, your
equipment will be better protected..

--
Mike Hall
MVP - Windows Shell/user



"Mark Williams" <MWilliams@att.net> wrote in message
news:Kj2Ed.8197$c13.7738@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
>I am checking on high-speed and looking into my options and trying to
> understand how to set it up. One question is that I currently have a
> Belkin
> Surgemaster Protector that includes cable and DSL protection. Is it a
> good idea to use it? Does it impact performance in any way? Should it
> be
> placed between the wall jack and the splitter?
>
> Thanks for any help you can provide!
>
>
>
Anonymous
January 9, 2005 7:22:03 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Mark Williams" <MWilliams@att.net> wrote...
>I am checking on high-speed and looking into my options and trying to
> understand how to set it up. One question is that I currently have a Belkin
> Surgemaster Protector that includes cable and DSL protection. Is it a
> good idea to use it? Does it impact performance in any way? Should it be
> placed between the wall jack and the splitter?

If the surge protector handles them, use it! It should not impact performance.

Connect it as close to the wall as possible, before any splitters, in-line amps,
etc.
Related resources
Anonymous
January 9, 2005 3:44:00 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Do you really hope that an in-line protector will stop what
miles of sky could not? Just another question that plug-in
protectors must have you avoid to sell their grossly
overpriced and undersized product. Even cable companies are
fixing their installations. That means an incoming cable must
'exceed' what the National Electrical Code (NEC) requires of
cable earthing. Cable first drops down and make a 'less than
10 foot' connection to earth before entering a building. No
surge protector required because a connection to earth ground
is made by direct hardwire. Many cable companies will remind
you that the protector will only degrade your signal and not
provide effective protection.

Another had cable protector AND still suffered damage. Of
course. A protector only distributes a surge onto all other
wires. Just more wires to find earth ground, destructively,
through an adjacent appliance. Surge protectors do not stop,
block, absorb or filter surges - except in myths. His damage
is defined in "network card and modem not working" on 3 Sept
2003 in newsgroup microsoft.public.windowsme.hardware
http://tinyurl.com/5h82o

Mark Williams wrote:
> I am checking on high-speed and looking into my options and trying to
> understand how to set it up. One question is that I currently have a
> Belkin Surgemaster Protector that includes cable and DSL protection.
> Is it a good idea to use it? Does it impact performance in any way?
> Should it be placed between the wall jack and the splitter?
>
> Thanks for any help you can provide!
Anonymous
January 11, 2005 11:39:55 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

The "miles of sky" as you put it were not designed to stop it - on the
other hand, I've used an "APC" UPS surge protection for all power, cable,
DSL and phone connections - and true it may "Not" stop it, if you register
the UPS properly and it fails, APC will replace damaged equipment up to the
maximum the APC device is insured for - even if the device itself is the
only item damaged, they will replace it free, especially for all the
advertisement revenue generated by it.


--
Star Fleet Admiral Q @ your service!


"w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:41E16D60.6B8AF5B9@hotmail.com...
> Do you really hope that an in-line protector will stop what
> miles of sky could not? Just another question that plug-in
> protectors must have you avoid to sell their grossly
> overpriced and undersized product. Even cable companies are
> fixing their installations. That means an incoming cable must
> 'exceed' what the National Electrical Code (NEC) requires of
> cable earthing. Cable first drops down and make a 'less than
> 10 foot' connection to earth before entering a building. No
> surge protector required because a connection to earth ground
> is made by direct hardwire. Many cable companies will remind
> you that the protector will only degrade your signal and not
> provide effective protection.
>
> Another had cable protector AND still suffered damage. Of
> course. A protector only distributes a surge onto all other
> wires. Just more wires to find earth ground, destructively,
> through an adjacent appliance. Surge protectors do not stop,
> block, absorb or filter surges - except in myths. His damage
> is defined in "network card and modem not working" on 3 Sept
> 2003 in newsgroup microsoft.public.windowsme.hardware
> http://tinyurl.com/5h82o
>
> Mark Williams wrote:
> > I am checking on high-speed and looking into my options and trying to
> > understand how to set it up. One question is that I currently have a
> > Belkin Surgemaster Protector that includes cable and DSL protection.
> > Is it a good idea to use it? Does it impact performance in any way?
> > Should it be placed between the wall jack and the splitter?
> >
> > Thanks for any help you can provide!
Anonymous
January 12, 2005 5:09:06 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Did you read the long list of exemptions that make that
warranty useless? They even have a claus that says using any
other manufacturer's surge protector means they need not honor
the promise. You have any Panamax in the house? Bottom line
- only likely to bee replaced is the APC product.

In the meantime, look at how it is wired. A surge confronts
protector and electronics simultaneously. Protection already
inside the electronics protects that electronics. But the
adjacent APC may be so grossly undersized as to be damage.
What does the naive then conclude? The protector sacrificed
itself to protect the computer. Bull. The surge was too
small to harm electronics and still destroyed the grossly
undersized protector. So the naive recommends this protector
to friends and buys more. What a racket!

First they have you believing the grossly undersized
protector does anything effective. Then they have you
believing in a warranty chock full of exemptions. So many
others have learned by experience:
W D Loughman on 11 May 2001 in comp.os.os2.misc
entitled "UPS advice"
> Don't take too seriously the implied protection of your monetary
> investment when APC says: "...UPS comes with a $25,000 lifetime
> hardware replacement guarantee."

> Described in this newsgroup late last year, their UPS failure
> caused me to spend c. $1200 on replacement equipment. After their
> own investigation of the damagING unit, they did not dispute the
> UPS failure. However, they reimbursed me only $200, no arguments
> accepted, with a required waiver = "Sign this now", or get
> nothing. They use a sort of "Blue Book" for computers, and paid
> only the values listed therein. NOT replacement cost. Cover
> your financial losses some other way, 'cause they sure won't.
> Buyer beware!

A surge protector must protect all electronics from a surge
that could not be stopped by miles of sky. Furthermore the
protector must shunt that surge to earth AND remain
functional. This is well proven and repeatedly demonstrated
even before WWII. But today, urban myth purveyors have
replaced science to promote ineffective, overpriced, and
grossly undersized protectors with a half truth about an
attached warranty. Too many are experts because "surge
protector = surge protection" - logic based upon word
association. Generally, the better a protector, then the
smaller a warranty. A benchmark in surge protection is
Polyphaser. What is their warranty? $0.

So many reasons why that APC recommendation is bogus -
including the implied warranty that is chock full of
exemptions to not be honored.

Admiral Q wrote:
> The "miles of sky" as you put it were not designed to stop it - on
> the other hand, I've used an "APC" UPS surge protection for all
> power, cable, DSL and phone connections - and true it may "Not"
> stop it, if you register the UPS properly and it fails, APC will
> replace damaged equipment up to the maximum the APC device is
> insured for - even if the device itself is the only item damaged,
> they will replace it free, especially for all the advertisement
> revenue generated by it.
!