Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

128-bit WEP key

Last response: in Wireless Networking
Share
March 17, 2005 3:01:52 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

I have some query about 128-bit WEP key.

As far as I know, 128-bit WEP key contains 13 ASCII characters or 26 hex
keys. On my Netgear wireless router, I type either 11 or 13 ASCII
characters into passphrase that all generate 26 hex keys. Is it correct or
a propriritory WEP key?

When I use WEP key generator at
http://www.andrewscompanies.com/tools/wep.asp, I type 11 ASCII characters
and output 22 hex keys and 13 ASCII characters output 26 hex keys. Why is
there such difference?

Can I use less than 13 ASCII characters for 128-bit WEP key or I have to use
exact 13 ASCII characters for 128-bit WEP key?

Your advice is highly appreciated.

Thanks,

Ray

More about : 128 bit wep key

Anonymous
March 17, 2005 3:01:53 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

"Ray" <NoSpam-ray.ck.li@Gmail.com> wrote in message
news:u4K05FkKFHA.2716@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>I have some query about 128-bit WEP key.
>
> As far as I know, 128-bit WEP key contains 13 ASCII characters or 26 hex
> keys. On my Netgear wireless router, I type either 11 or 13 ASCII
> characters into passphrase that all generate 26 hex keys. Is it correct
> or a propriritory WEP key?
>

Can you use a HEX key with the Netgear? I find ASCII passkeys hardly ever
work unless all the equipment on the network is the same brand. Some brands
use a proprietary algorithm to generate a HEX key from the passkey you
enter.

Kerry
March 17, 2005 1:24:46 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

Kerry,

I can use HEX decimal key on Netgear.

Currently I use this way to make the wireless LAN work. Type the password
into passphrase of Netgear and got the hex decimal key - very strange always
26 hex decimal keys if I type in 6 to 13 characters. I copy the key and
place it into other client machines.

Alternatively, I type exact 13 characters into passphrase of Wep key
generator and copy the hex decimal key to Netgear and other client machines.
It also works. However, I cannot type less than 13 characters for 128-bit
wep key as some units count no of key to determine if 64-bit or 128-bit wep
key.

It causes me confused due to the fact that I type the same password in both
systems and get totally different keys. In normal use, ie., hot spots, all
the people are using password not hex decimal key. How do the computers
convert the correct hex decimal key to unlock the encryption?

Ray


"Kerry Brown" <kerry@kdbNOSPAMsystems.c*o*m> wrote in message
news:uY17$AlKFHA.3864@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> "Ray" <NoSpam-ray.ck.li@Gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:u4K05FkKFHA.2716@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>>I have some query about 128-bit WEP key.
>>
>> As far as I know, 128-bit WEP key contains 13 ASCII characters or 26 hex
>> keys. On my Netgear wireless router, I type either 11 or 13 ASCII
>> characters into passphrase that all generate 26 hex keys. Is it correct
>> or a propriritory WEP key?
>>
>
> Can you use a HEX key with the Netgear? I find ASCII passkeys hardly ever
> work unless all the equipment on the network is the same brand. Some
> brands use a proprietary algorithm to generate a HEX key from the passkey
> you enter.
>
> Kerry
>
>
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 1:24:47 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windows.networking.wireless (More info?)

"Ray" <NoSpam-lizhiqiang1@GMail.com> wrote in message
news:o Vz59hpKFHA.508@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> Kerry,
>
> I can use HEX decimal key on Netgear.
>
> Currently I use this way to make the wireless LAN work. Type the password
> into passphrase of Netgear and got the hex decimal key - very strange
> always 26 hex decimal keys if I type in 6 to 13 characters. I copy the
> key and place it into other client machines.
>
> Alternatively, I type exact 13 characters into passphrase of Wep key
> generator and copy the hex decimal key to Netgear and other client
> machines. It also works. However, I cannot type less than 13 characters
> for 128-bit wep key as some units count no of key to determine if 64-bit
> or 128-bit wep key.
>
> It causes me confused due to the fact that I type the same password in
> both systems and get totally different keys. In normal use, ie., hot
> spots, all the people are using password not hex decimal key. How do the
> computers convert the correct hex decimal key to unlock the encryption?
>

There are no standards for key generation. different manufacturers use
different algorithms. That's why I suggested always using hex. The password
for a hotspot has nothing to do with the WEP key. It is to authenticate you
as a paid up customer.

Kerry
!