New Main Hard Drive

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

At present I have 2 HD's in my pc: a 6GB which holds all my system progs (XP,
utilities progs etc.) & a 10GB for games, music & such like.
The 6GB is getting a bit crowded to say the least so I've invested in a new
120GB drive.
What I obviously want to do is install this drive into my pc but I'm
wondering how I go about transfering all the files & sys set-up from the 6GB
to the new one. Do I have to copy every single bit of data from the 6GB to
CD-ROM & then transfer it all on to the 120 GB a disk at a time or is there a
much easier way that is staring me in the face?
Please help this nube.
Thanks.
5 answers Last reply
More about main hard drive
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    You may want to visit the drive manufacturer's web site. They have utilities
    that help you do this and guide you thru.

    Try running it before you even install the drive

    --
    Jon Hildrum
    DTS MVP
    Jon_Hildrum@msn.com
    www.hildrum.com
    "Eggenberg4Ever" <spmodea@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:36C3B71B-1FF1-401A-B250-C82A4F076538@microsoft.com...
    > At present I have 2 HD's in my pc: a 6GB which holds all my system progs
    (XP,
    > utilities progs etc.) & a 10GB for games, music & such like.
    > The 6GB is getting a bit crowded to say the least so I've invested in a
    new
    > 120GB drive.
    > What I obviously want to do is install this drive into my pc but I'm
    > wondering how I go about transfering all the files & sys set-up from the
    6GB
    > to the new one. Do I have to copy every single bit of data from the 6GB to
    > CD-ROM & then transfer it all on to the 120 GB a disk at a time or is
    there a
    > much easier way that is staring me in the face?
    > Please help this nube.
    > Thanks.
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    In news:36C3B71B-1FF1-401A-B250-C82A4F076538@microsoft.com,
    Eggenberg4Ever <spmodea@hotmail.com> had this to say:

    >Do I have to copy every single bit of data
    > from the 6GB to CD-ROM & then transfer it all on to the 120 GB a disk
    > at a time or is there a much easier way that is staring me in the
    > face?
    > Please help this nube.
    > Thanks.

    In short? Yes. Yes, yes you do. And, yes there is. Each and every iota of
    data and even then DLLs may need to be reloaded and the like with some
    software. Make sure it's something that runs outside of the operating
    system, that will go a long ways towards helping... Personally? I have a
    copy of Norton Ghost 2003 that I use for such activities and a good search
    for freeware MIGHT turn up something that would do that for you. What this
    application does is takes an exact replica of my drive from outside of the
    operating system and transfers it entirely to another drive/partition. In
    your case you'd take the copy of your drive and put it on the new drive
    while it's configured as a slave. You'd then convert it to Master (jumper or
    bios or however you select) and it would run exactly the same as it was when
    you had the other drive. While this is a bit ahead of the game, when you get
    that far you'll want to open up system properties, click on the hardware
    tab, click device manager, and under you IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers you'll
    want to right click the primary IDE channel, select properties, advanced
    settings, and select DMA if available. Sometimes XP has been known to not
    change that automatically here and I've had to do it manually. It requires a
    reboot. I do not know of any freeware applications that will do this for
    you. The above post suggested that you check with the drive manufacturer's
    site and that's a good place to start. I've been using Ghost 2k3 for my
    backup needs for a while now (about three years I imagine) and it's been
    very effective. Every few days I reboot and make a complete backup image of
    my drive so that all changes are recorded. I suppose I could probably
    partition a drive and make multiple snapshots over time but that'd be a lot
    like work and the reason I use the program is because it's really very
    simple and doesn't require a lot of work. It's easy, effective, and simple.
    There are many additional programs that will do this for you so don't take
    my usage of a Symantec product as a recommendation of their services. I
    usually don't recommend them at all but in this case this is one piece of
    software that I couldn't live without. Try the manufacturer's site. If not
    try your favorite freeware/shareware site. Find a trial piece of software
    too if you'd like. I'm sure that there's an easy (and I hope free) solution
    for you.

    Galen

    --

    "My mind rebels at stagnation. Give me problems, give me work, give me
    the most abstruse cryptogram or the most intricate analysis, and I am
    in my own proper atmosphere. I can dispense then with artificial
    stimulants. But I abhor the dull routine of existence. I crave for
    mental exaltation." -- Sherlock Holmes
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    OK it's simple.

    Buy a Maxtor or Seagate drive - retail version - and you get a free CD with
    disk utilities.

    These enable you to initialise, partition and format the drive, then 'clone'
    the old disk to the new and make the new drive your 'system' or bootable
    drive: all via simple prompts and responses.

    After which you'll need to reconfigure the syste, however all this is
    explained in the user guide that comes with the new drive.

    You will then most likely need to perform a repair install to enable Windows
    to overcome it's objection to being moved to a bigger and different drive.

    If your's is an existing drive, then maybe you can get a download that will
    work: or else get Ghost 9 to do a similar thing.

    If your copy of Windows is an OEM edition [as sup[plied originally with a
    new build PC] then you'll have to buy a full retail version: either Upgrade
    Edition or Full Edition. This is because of the tighter restrictions imposed
    on the cheaper OEM edition.

    "Galen" wrote:

    > In news:36C3B71B-1FF1-401A-B250-C82A4F076538@microsoft.com,
    > Eggenberg4Ever <spmodea@hotmail.com> had this to say:
    >
    > >Do I have to copy every single bit of data
    > > from the 6GB to CD-ROM & then transfer it all on to the 120 GB a disk
    > > at a time or is there a much easier way that is staring me in the
    > > face?
    > > Please help this nube.
    > > Thanks.
    >
    > In short? Yes. Yes, yes you do. And, yes there is. Each and every iota of
    > data and even then DLLs may need to be reloaded and the like with some
    > software. Make sure it's something that runs outside of the operating
    > system, that will go a long ways towards helping... Personally? I have a
    > copy of Norton Ghost 2003 that I use for such activities and a good search
    > for freeware MIGHT turn up something that would do that for you. What this
    > application does is takes an exact replica of my drive from outside of the
    > operating system and transfers it entirely to another drive/partition. In
    > your case you'd take the copy of your drive and put it on the new drive
    > while it's configured as a slave. You'd then convert it to Master (jumper or
    > bios or however you select) and it would run exactly the same as it was when
    > you had the other drive. While this is a bit ahead of the game, when you get
    > that far you'll want to open up system properties, click on the hardware
    > tab, click device manager, and under you IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers you'll
    > want to right click the primary IDE channel, select properties, advanced
    > settings, and select DMA if available. Sometimes XP has been known to not
    > change that automatically here and I've had to do it manually. It requires a
    > reboot. I do not know of any freeware applications that will do this for
    > you. The above post suggested that you check with the drive manufacturer's
    > site and that's a good place to start. I've been using Ghost 2k3 for my
    > backup needs for a while now (about three years I imagine) and it's been
    > very effective. Every few days I reboot and make a complete backup image of
    > my drive so that all changes are recorded. I suppose I could probably
    > partition a drive and make multiple snapshots over time but that'd be a lot
    > like work and the reason I use the program is because it's really very
    > simple and doesn't require a lot of work. It's easy, effective, and simple.
    > There are many additional programs that will do this for you so don't take
    > my usage of a Symantec product as a recommendation of their services. I
    > usually don't recommend them at all but in this case this is one piece of
    > software that I couldn't live without. Try the manufacturer's site. If not
    > try your favorite freeware/shareware site. Find a trial piece of software
    > too if you'd like. I'm sure that there's an easy (and I hope free) solution
    > for you.
    >
    > Galen
    >
    > --
    >
    > "My mind rebels at stagnation. Give me problems, give me work, give me
    > the most abstruse cryptogram or the most intricate analysis, and I am
    > in my own proper atmosphere. I can dispense then with artificial
    > stimulants. But I abhor the dull routine of existence. I crave for
    > mental exaltation." -- Sherlock Holmes
    >
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Eggenberg4Ever wrote:

    >At present I have 2 HD's in my pc: a 6GB which holds all my system progs (XP,
    >utilities progs etc.) & a 10GB for games, music & such like.
    >The 6GB is getting a bit crowded to say the least so I've invested in a new
    >120GB drive.
    >What I obviously want to do is install this drive into my pc but I'm
    >wondering how I go about transfering all the files & sys set-up from the 6GB
    >to the new one.

    What I use is BootIT NG, from http://www.BootitNG.com ($35 shareware -
    30 day full functional trial)

    Download, to its own folder, extract from the zip, run the bootitng to
    make a boot floppy.

    With the new drive plugged in as slave/secondary, boot the floppy,
    Cancel Install, entering maintenance, then click on Partition work.
    Highlight your C:,Copy, then on left select the new drive (HD1),
    highlight the Free Space in it, and Paste.

    You might then well consider a resize up a bit - say 16 GB which
    should be comfortable for system and programs if you move the My
    Documents folder to the data drive. Leave some free space so as later
    to make a new separate partition for that in XP - Control Panel - Admin
    Tools - Computer Management, select Disk Management and look lower right
    for the graphic of the drive. Right click the Unallocated space and
    Create partition -make one or two more

    Now click on 'View MBR' and in it highlight the entry for this new C
    partition and click the 'Set Active' Click 'Write Standard MBR' and
    Apply.

    Close out, swap the disks to make the new one the one that boots, and
    reboot into XP.

    --
    Alex Nichol MS MVP (Windows Technologies)
    Bournemouth, U.K. Alexn@mvps.D8E8L.org (remove the D8 bit)
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    "Eggenberg4Ever" <spmodea@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:36C3B71B-1FF1-401A-B250-C82A4F076538@microsoft.com...
    > At present I have 2 HD's in my pc: a 6GB which holds all my system progs
    > (XP,
    > utilities progs etc.) & a 10GB for games, music & such like.
    > The 6GB is getting a bit crowded to say the least so I've invested in a
    > new
    > 120GB drive.
    > What I obviously want to do is install this drive into my pc but I'm
    > wondering how I go about transfering all the files & sys set-up from the
    > 6GB
    > to the new one. Do I have to copy every single bit of data from the 6GB to
    > CD-ROM & then transfer it all on to the 120 GB a disk at a time or is
    > there a
    > much easier way that is staring me in the face?
    > Please help this nube.
    > Thanks.

    You sound as if your PC is rather dated. Are you sure that your new HDD
    will
    even work with your hardware. You may need a PCI controller card for your
    new HDD.
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