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re-activation

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Anonymous
February 17, 2005 9:10:19 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Reading page 239 in UK Computer Shopper I had quite a shock. I currently
have a AMD 2500+, 1gb RAM, 80gb ATA 133 HD etc. Its a self build, and I
bought Windows XP inc SP2 OEM at time of purchase.

I was thinking of maybe upgrading to a Socket 939 mobo + New CPU, SATA HD,
6600GT graphics etc you get the idea. Of course I knew all this would
require a new activation, the only parts of hardware I would be keeping were
the RAM and monitor.

Then I read about how someone bought a new motherboard and CPU and needed to
reactivate, rang up Microsoft but because it was an OEM copy it was deemed
as being installed on a different computer. Yet it seems with the retail
version you could reactivate.

This has got to be the stupidest idea ever!! Whilst I can afford to upgrade
hardware, I can't or won't buy something I already have just because I've
upgraded, would more likely put the effort into learning Linux than forking
out more cash. Also means if too many of my parts go wrong I could have to
buy another copy too.

If this is true I'll just get a new graphics card and maybe a new DVD
writer.

The magazine said something about calculating a new ID if the maximum number
of changes hasn't been exceeded in 120 days, but this is just a rumour??

I checked and I have an oembios.bin file on my computer. Apparently that
means I cant even choose a different make of motherboard!

Thanks
Mike

More about : activation

Anonymous
February 17, 2005 9:10:20 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

OEM stands for Original Equipment Manufacturer. The place where your have
bought the XP, with the hardware, is responsible in support your XP
problems/question. Not Microsoft. This is why it is at a reduced price,
compared to the Retail kit.


"Fugwump" <fugwumpÑØSPÄM@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:4214de2e$0$19157$cc9e4d1f@news-text.dial.pipex.com...
> Reading page 239 in UK Computer Shopper I had quite a shock. I currently
> have a AMD 2500+, 1gb RAM, 80gb ATA 133 HD etc. Its a self build, and I
> bought Windows XP inc SP2 OEM at time of purchase.
>
> I was thinking of maybe upgrading to a Socket 939 mobo + New CPU, SATA HD,
> 6600GT graphics etc you get the idea. Of course I knew all this would
> require a new activation, the only parts of hardware I would be keeping
> were the RAM and monitor.
>
> Then I read about how someone bought a new motherboard and CPU and needed
> to reactivate, rang up Microsoft but because it was an OEM copy it was
> deemed as being installed on a different computer. Yet it seems with the
> retail version you could reactivate.
>
> This has got to be the stupidest idea ever!! Whilst I can afford to
> upgrade hardware, I can't or won't buy something I already have just
> because I've upgraded, would more likely put the effort into learning
> Linux than forking out more cash. Also means if too many of my parts go
> wrong I could have to buy another copy too.
>
> If this is true I'll just get a new graphics card and maybe a new DVD
> writer.
>
> The magazine said something about calculating a new ID if the maximum
> number of changes hasn't been exceeded in 120 days, but this is just a
> rumour??
>
> I checked and I have an oembios.bin file on my computer. Apparently that
> means I cant even choose a different make of motherboard!
>
> Thanks
> Mike
>
Anonymous
February 17, 2005 9:10:20 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

It sounds like that article is only telling half the story with half the
truth.
You will probably have no problem activating.
You seem to be upgrading instead of a new computer so activation should be
OK.
Attempt internet activation.
If that fails, choose the option to activate by phone.
Call Microsoft at the displayed number, done in about 5 minutes.

You might have more of a problem if you had a major OEM computer such as
Gateway, Dell, HP etc.
Some of their CDs are locked to the BIOS of the motherboard and will not
install on a motherboard from a different manufacturer.

Read your specific EULA for details.

--
Jupiter Jones [MVP]
http://www3.telus.net/dandemar/


"Fugwump" <fugwumpÑØSPÄM@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:4214de2e$0$19157$cc9e4d1f@news-text.dial.pipex.com...
> Reading page 239 in UK Computer Shopper I had quite a shock. I currently
> have a AMD 2500+, 1gb RAM, 80gb ATA 133 HD etc. Its a self build, and I
> bought Windows XP inc SP2 OEM at time of purchase.
>
> I was thinking of maybe upgrading to a Socket 939 mobo + New CPU, SATA HD,
> 6600GT graphics etc you get the idea. Of course I knew all this would
> require a new activation, the only parts of hardware I would be keeping
> were the RAM and monitor.
>
> Then I read about how someone bought a new motherboard and CPU and needed
> to reactivate, rang up Microsoft but because it was an OEM copy it was
> deemed as being installed on a different computer. Yet it seems with the
> retail version you could reactivate.
>
> This has got to be the stupidest idea ever!! Whilst I can afford to
> upgrade hardware, I can't or won't buy something I already have just
> because I've upgraded, would more likely put the effort into learning
> Linux than forking out more cash. Also means if too many of my parts go
> wrong I could have to buy another copy too.
>
> If this is true I'll just get a new graphics card and maybe a new DVD
> writer.
>
> The magazine said something about calculating a new ID if the maximum
> number of changes hasn't been exceeded in 120 days, but this is just a
> rumour??
>
> I checked and I have an oembios.bin file on my computer. Apparently that
> means I cant even choose a different make of motherboard!
>
> Thanks
> Mike
>
Related resources
Anonymous
February 17, 2005 11:27:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

On Thu, 17 Feb 2005 18:10:19 +0000, Fugwump wrote:
>
> This has got to be the stupidest idea ever!! Whilst I can afford to upgrade
> hardware, I can't or won't buy something I already have just because I've
> upgraded, would more likely put the effort into learning Linux than forking
> out more cash. Also means if too many of my parts go wrong I could have to
> buy another copy too.

Like it or not, it's part of the OEM structure and has been for years. You
didn't buy XP, you bought an OEM License to use it on ONE computer.

If you switch to Linux, try Fedora Core 3 from RedHat, it's very smooth
and the GNOME interface is very windows like.



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Anonymous
February 17, 2005 11:46:54 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

> You need to purchase a "Retail Version" of Windows XP
> if you plan on making significant hardware changes in the
> future. An "OEM Version" is cheaper because its license
> is tied to the very first hardware configuration it is installed
> and activated on.

As my PC is a non docked computer, and I won't be changing the NIC
(connected to mobo) would that will give me 5 changes before I have to
re-activate ? (i.e on the 6th one I would have to re-activate which I can't
do with an OEM copy)

Upgrading my DVD-Writers firmware has already used one change!

After 120 (or I read somewhere 180) days will those changes go back to zero
on an OEM copy.

Also can I format my drive and re-install windows when ever I want. I read
on one website that if I have activated within the last 120 days on the same
computer, then I have to ring up Microsoft to get another activation code,
even though I'm still using the same hardware??
Anonymous
February 17, 2005 11:48:58 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

>> This has got to be the stupidest idea ever!! Whilst I can afford to
>> upgrade
>> hardware, I can't or won't buy something I already have just because I've
>> upgraded, would more likely put the effort into learning Linux than
>> forking
>> out more cash. Also means if too many of my parts go wrong I could have
>> to
>> buy another copy too.
>
> Like it or not, it's part of the OEM structure and has been for years. You
> didn't buy XP, you bought an OEM License to use it on ONE computer.
>
> If you switch to Linux, try Fedora Core 3 from RedHat, it's very smooth
> and the GNOME interface is very windows like.

I tried the earlier version of Fedora Core, can't remember what version -
didn't like it alot for some reason. I thought Suse was best then Mandrake,
but I haven't tried many, plus I guess I was judging on eye candy.
Anonymous
February 17, 2005 11:53:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

On Thu, 17 Feb 2005 20:48:58 +0000, Fugwump wrote:

>>> This has got to be the stupidest idea ever!! Whilst I can afford to
>>> upgrade
>>> hardware, I can't or won't buy something I already have just because I've
>>> upgraded, would more likely put the effort into learning Linux than
>>> forking
>>> out more cash. Also means if too many of my parts go wrong I could have
>>> to
>>> buy another copy too.
>>
>> Like it or not, it's part of the OEM structure and has been for years. You
>> didn't buy XP, you bought an OEM License to use it on ONE computer.
>>
>> If you switch to Linux, try Fedora Core 3 from RedHat, it's very smooth
>> and the GNOME interface is very windows like.
>
> I tried the earlier version of Fedora Core, can't remember what version -
> didn't like it alot for some reason. I thought Suse was best then Mandrake,
> but I haven't tried many, plus I guess I was judging on eye candy.

I just got done doing reviews of SUSE 9.1 Personal, Mandrake 10.0 Official
and RedHat FC3 and found that FC3 was the better performer and all of the
GUI interfaces worked without any config changes. I tested on single P3
and P4 systems and even Dual P3 Compaq ML350's so that I could have an
even base to go from.

Since installing FC3 I find I spend about 80% of my online time using the
FC3 machine, but I also have to use XP to support clients
networks/systems. Don't get me wrong, I'm very happy with Windows XP and
2000/2003, but FC3 is making a great desktop platform for home systems
that don't need games.

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Anonymous
February 18, 2005 1:27:45 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Fugwump" <fugwumpÑØSPÄM@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:421502b0$0$19157$cc9e4d1f@news-text.dial.pipex.com...
>> You need to purchase a "Retail Version" of Windows XP
>> if you plan on making significant hardware changes in the
>> future. An "OEM Version" is cheaper because its license
>> is tied to the very first hardware configuration it is installed
>> and activated on.
>
> As my PC is a non docked computer, and I won't be changing the NIC
> (connected to mobo) would that will give me 5 changes before I have to
> re-activate ? (i.e on the 6th one I would have to re-activate which I
> can't do with an OEM copy)
>
> Upgrading my DVD-Writers firmware has already used one change!
>
> After 120 (or I read somewhere 180) days will those changes go back to
> zero on an OEM copy.
>
> Also can I format my drive and re-install windows when ever I want. I
> read on one website that if I have activated within the last 120 days on
> the same computer, then I have to ring up Microsoft to get another
> activation code, even though I'm still using the same hardware??
>

I don't know what or where you're reading these things, but you're getting
yourself in a froth for no reason. You can upgrade your computer as often as
you want. If you hit a point where the computer says you have to reactivate,
you do it online or by phone. At the worst, you talk to a rep, tell them
that you upgraded, repaired, formatted your hard drive, whatever it might
be, and they let you activate. No big deal.
Anonymous
February 18, 2005 5:37:15 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

>>> You need to purchase a "Retail Version" of Windows XP
>>> if you plan on making significant hardware changes in the
>>> future. An "OEM Version" is cheaper because its license
>>> is tied to the very first hardware configuration it is installed
>>> and activated on.
>>
>> As my PC is a non docked computer, and I won't be changing the NIC
>> (connected to mobo) would that will give me 5 changes before I have to
>> re-activate ? (i.e on the 6th one I would have to re-activate which I
>> can't do with an OEM copy)
>>
>> Upgrading my DVD-Writers firmware has already used one change!
>>
>> After 120 (or I read somewhere 180) days will those changes go back to
>> zero on an OEM copy.
>>
>> Also can I format my drive and re-install windows when ever I want. I
>> read on one website that if I have activated within the last 120 days on
>> the same computer, then I have to ring up Microsoft to get another
>> activation code, even though I'm still using the same hardware??
>>
>
> I don't know what or where you're reading these things, but you're getting
> yourself in a froth for no reason. You can upgrade your computer as often
> as you want. If you hit a point where the computer says you have to
> reactivate, you do it online or by phone. At the worst, you talk to a rep,
> tell them that you upgraded, repaired, formatted your hard drive, whatever
> it might be, and they let you activate. No big deal.

I think I'm mostly reading old stuff off google.
I've confirmed they will with a Retail copy, but I have a OEM copy.

Carey Frisch above says
"You need to purchase a "Retail Version" of Windows XP if you plan on making
significant hardware changes in the future. An "OEM Version" is cheaper
because its license
is tied to the very first hardware configuration it is installed and
activated on."

But Jupiter Jones (thats got to be the coolest name ever!) says I shouldn't
have any problem.

I just dont want to buy a load of upgrades then find out I can't
re-activate. Then either have to buy another £60 OEM copy or £160 Retail
copy.
Anonymous
February 18, 2005 5:37:16 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

It boils down to whether you "create" a new PC as opposed to "upgrading
some components", and if the OEM cd is BIOS locked. Replacing everything
BUT the ram would usually be considered to be a new computer. Let your
conscience be your guide.

Fugwump wrote:

>>>>You need to purchase a "Retail Version" of Windows XP
>>>>if you plan on making significant hardware changes in the
>>>>future. An "OEM Version" is cheaper because its license
>>>>is tied to the very first hardware configuration it is installed
>>>>and activated on.
>>>>
>>>As my PC is a non docked computer, and I won't be changing the NIC
>>>(connected to mobo) would that will give me 5 changes before I have to
>>>re-activate ? (i.e on the 6th one I would have to re-activate which I
>>>can't do with an OEM copy)
>>>
>>>Upgrading my DVD-Writers firmware has already used one change!
>>>
>>>After 120 (or I read somewhere 180) days will those changes go back to
>>>zero on an OEM copy.
>>>
>>>Also can I format my drive and re-install windows when ever I want. I
>>>read on one website that if I have activated within the last 120 days on
>>>the same computer, then I have to ring up Microsoft to get another
>>>activation code, even though I'm still using the same hardware??
>>>
>>>
>>I don't know what or where you're reading these things, but you're getting
>>yourself in a froth for no reason. You can upgrade your computer as often
>>as you want. If you hit a point where the computer says you have to
>>reactivate, you do it online or by phone. At the worst, you talk to a rep,
>>tell them that you upgraded, repaired, formatted your hard drive, whatever
>>it might be, and they let you activate. No big deal.
>>
>
> I think I'm mostly reading old stuff off google.
> I've confirmed they will with a Retail copy, but I have a OEM copy.
>
> Carey Frisch above says
> "You need to purchase a "Retail Version" of Windows XP if you plan on making
> significant hardware changes in the future. An "OEM Version" is cheaper
> because its license
> is tied to the very first hardware configuration it is installed and
> activated on."
>
> But Jupiter Jones (thats got to be the coolest name ever!) says I shouldn't
> have any problem.
>
> I just dont want to buy a load of upgrades then find out I can't
> re-activate. Then either have to buy another £60 OEM copy or £160 Retail
> copy.
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
February 19, 2005 1:40:14 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

> Hi, Fugwump.
>
> Rather than listening to other users' interpretations of the rules, why
> not get the story straight from the source:
> Microsoft Product Activation
> http://www.microsoft.com/piracy/activation.mspx
>
> The OEM rules may seem unfair when seen from the perspective of one who
> has already bought an OEM copy without knowing those rules. But if you
> start at the beginning of the story, it makes more sense. Major OEMs
> (such as Dell or HP) buy WinXP licenses by the millions and they negotiate
> special prices - and special terms - with Microsoft. Among other things,
> each OEM is allowed to customize WinXP to fit that company's specific
> hardware. Since Microsoft can't control these changes, the OEM is required
> to assume the responsibility to support this customized version. Also,
> since there's no way that either the OEM or Microsoft can be sure that the
> customized WinXP will run properly (or at all) on different hardware, the
> OEM agreement specifies that the WinXP license for that copy is limited to
> the specific computer on which it is pre-installed. Any customer who buys
> that computer gets the license to run that copy of WinXP on that one
> computer, but cannot move it to any other computer. Ever. And any later
> buyer of that hardware as a used computer is bound by the same license
> agreement.
>
> Smaller OEMs don't have Dell's bargaining power, but they still need to
> buy WinXP to pre-install on the computers they assemble and sell.
> Microsoft produces a "generic" OEM version of WinXP which computer dealers
> can incorporate into their products. This generic OEM is not as highly
> customized, but the dealer must agree to terms that restrict each copy to
> the computer on which it is pre-installed. The consumer buys the bundle
> subject to this contract and cannot legally move the generic OEM WinXP to
> a different computer. Ever.
>
> The boxed copies of WinXP that you see on your computer store's shelf are
> the "retail" version. Microsoft can't know in advance what kind of
> computer it will be installed on. The license for that retail WinXP
> allows it to be installed on any computer in the world (almost), so long
> as it is installed on only a single computer at any one time. So a retail
> WinXP can be removed from one computer and installed on another. And it
> can be reinstalled on "the same computer" an unlimited number of times.
> If it has been more than 120 days since the last prior activation, it can
> be reactivated automatically over the Internet, even on a different
> computer.
>
> That leaves the problem of defining "the same computer". Without getting
> into the details, it is clear that just changing the graphics card or a
> hard drive or adding a USB camera does not make this a different computer.
> But installing a new mobo/cpu/chipset/controller and HD in the existing
> case is not much different than moving WinXP to that new hardware in a new
> case; it's what's inside that counts, so this is not "the same computer",
> even if it still looks the same. Even a retail WinXP will probably need
> to be reactivated after such a significant change.
>
> So the first question is: OEM or retail? You said:
>> but I have a OEM copy.
>
> So it seems that, if you've changed your hardware so significantly that
> your copy of WinXP no longer recognizes its environment as "the same
> computer", then you will need to buy a retail copy of WinXP and start
> over. The "upgrade version" is much cheaper but, unless you can show it
> evidence of a qualifying product (your old Win98 CD-ROM?) when Setup asks,
> you'll need the full version.
>
> You could buy just enough hardware to allow you to buy another OEM WinXP
> disc and license, I suppose, but that would simply put you back in the
> same situation the next time you significantly upgrade or change your
> computer.
>
> RC
> --
> R. C. White, CPA
> San Marcos, TX
> rc@corridor.net
> Microsoft Windows MVP

Hi
Thanks for taking the time to type a long reply.

In the newsgroup "microsoft.public.windowsxp" someone by the name of "Black
Shuck" wrote on "10/02/2005 23:33" (this newsgroup doesn't seem to be
carried on google so can't link to it)

"Am having problems with regularly having to re-activate my copy of XP.
It's very annoying...

Let me explain. I own a legitimate copy of XP Pro OEM, and I recently
upgraded my system, with a new motherboard, HDD and memory. (the old
parts were passed on to a relative). Upon reinstalling windows, I was
asked to re-activate, which I expected, however it told me I could not
activate it, as it had already been activated. I had not transferred
the licence with my old parts, so I still had a valid XP Pro licence. So
I phoned the helpline number, they generated a new installation ID, and
provided the code. All was good again..."

What he seems to be saying is he owns a copy of XP Pro OEM and upgraded his
system significantly, a new motherboard, HDD and memory. This especially if
his MAC address, i.e an inbuilt NIC caused him to need to re-activate. But
he goes on to say that he phoned the helpline and they generated a new ID.

Either he was lucky, or you can significantly upgrade hardware if you have a
standard OEM instead of a SLP OEM. Mine is a standard OEM. Probably just
lucky though!

BTW he goes on to say he has trouble when he installs new memory, it keeps
asking him to re-activate.

I read my EULA when I re-installed a few hours ago, but couldn't make much
out from the legal mumbo jumbo!

Something interesting I noticed. Theres a program called XPInfo that I
checked before I re-installed. A checkbox was unchecked for "CD-ROM drive".
I haven't changed my DVD-Writer since I first activated about August last
year, I figured this must be due to me upgrading the firmware on it about a
month ago.

I re-installed a few hours ago and activated through the net fine. Now when
I check XPInfo my CD-Rom check box is checked meaning it is now using my
current profile with the firmware upgrade because its been over 120 days.

So when's longhorn coming out? Is the activation process going to be any
different? I may just stick with what I got and upgrade minor parts until
then.

Thanks
Mike
Anonymous
February 19, 2005 1:41:53 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

On Fri, 18 Feb 2005 22:40:14 +0000, Fugwump wrote:

> What he seems to be saying is he owns a copy of XP Pro OEM and upgraded his
> system significantly, a new motherboard, HDD and memory. This especially if
> his MAC address, i.e an inbuilt NIC caused him to need to re-activate. But
> he goes on to say that he phoned the helpline and they generated a new ID.
>
> Either he was lucky, or you can significantly upgrade hardware if you have a
> standard OEM instead of a SLP OEM. Mine is a standard OEM. Probably just
> lucky though!

His was a typical experience. Many people can call MS and explain their
situation and MS Phone Support people will provide a activation key that
will let the user regain their system. That doesn't change the fact that
the OEM license isn't valid any more, it just means that there are some
nice people at MS that are willing to cut an honest person a break.


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Anonymous
February 19, 2005 2:36:56 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

> His was a typical experience. Many people can call MS and explain their
> situation and MS Phone Support people will provide a activation key that
> will let the user regain their system. That doesn't change the fact that
> the OEM license isn't valid any more, it just means that there are some
> nice people at MS that are willing to cut an honest person a break.

Ahh I see. Do you know how an activation key works? Why do you think that
just changing his memory made him need to re-activate after he had rang up
tech support and got a activation key?
Anonymous
February 19, 2005 2:49:06 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

On Fri, 18 Feb 2005 23:36:56 +0000, Fugwump wrote:

>> His was a typical experience. Many people can call MS and explain their
>> situation and MS Phone Support people will provide a activation key that
>> will let the user regain their system. That doesn't change the fact that
>> the OEM license isn't valid any more, it just means that there are some
>> nice people at MS that are willing to cut an honest person a break.
>
> Ahh I see. Do you know how an activation key works? Why do you think that
> just changing his memory made him need to re-activate after he had rang up
> tech support and got a activation key?

Yes, I do understand activation and the method used to compute if
activation is needed again - do you?

Based on the number of changes and some magic hash value a reactivation
may be needed - it's on the MS site if you care to look.

Just changing the memory would not require re-activation in most cases,
but the OP had change many things, not just the RAM.


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Anonymous
February 19, 2005 3:27:09 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

> Yes, I do understand activation and the method used to compute if
> activation is needed again - do you?

Well, I sort of do. Its the activation key I had never heard of before, but
read a post on google and think I undertand it now.

> Based on the number of changes and some magic hash value a reactivation
> may be needed - it's on the MS site if you care to look.
>
> Just changing the memory would not require re-activation in most cases,
> but the OP had change many things, not just the RAM.

Yeah he did, but he got that all sorted by calling them up. Then he just
changed the memory and needed to reactivate. Anyway doesn't matter anymore,
I only really want to get a new graphics card so I can play/try out World of
Warcraft mainly, and other current games. Got a FX5200 now!
Anonymous
February 19, 2005 3:27:10 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Here is a good explanation:
http://aumha.org/win5/a/wpa.htm

--
Jupiter Jones [MVP]
http://www3.telus.net/dandemar/


"Fugwump" <fugwump@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:421687e1$0$19159$cc9e4d1f@news-text.dial.pipex.com...
>
>> Yes, I do understand activation and the method used to compute if
>> activation is needed again - do you?
>
> Well, I sort of do. Its the activation key I had never heard of before,
> but read a post on google and think I undertand it now.
>
>> Based on the number of changes and some magic hash value a reactivation
>> may be needed - it's on the MS site if you care to look.
>>
>> Just changing the memory would not require re-activation in most cases,
>> but the OP had change many things, not just the RAM.
>
> Yeah he did, but he got that all sorted by calling them up. Then he just
> changed the memory and needed to reactivate. Anyway doesn't matter
> anymore, I only really want to get a new graphics card so I can play/try
> out World of Warcraft mainly, and other current games. Got a FX5200 now!
>
>
Anonymous
February 19, 2005 6:35:24 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Kudos. Great answer. So much better than the guesswork
of most replies. Keep up the good work.

Jupiter Jones [MVP] wrote:
| It sounds like that article is only telling half the story with half
| the truth.
| You will probably have no problem activating.
| You seem to be upgrading instead of a new computer so activation
| should be OK.
| Attempt internet activation.
| If that fails, choose the option to activate by phone.
| Call Microsoft at the displayed number, done in about 5 minutes.
|
| You might have more of a problem if you had a major OEM computer such
| as Gateway, Dell, HP etc.
| Some of their CDs are locked to the BIOS of the motherboard and will
| not install on a motherboard from a different manufacturer.
|
| Read your specific EULA for details.
|
|
| "Fugwump" <fugwumpÑØSPÄM@gmail.com> wrote in message
| news:4214de2e$0$19157$cc9e4d1f@news-text.dial.pipex.com...
|| Reading page 239 in UK Computer Shopper I had quite a shock. I
|| currently have a AMD 2500+, 1gb RAM, 80gb ATA 133 HD etc. Its a
|| self build, and I bought Windows XP inc SP2 OEM at time of purchase.
Anonymous
February 19, 2005 6:39:42 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Fugwump wrote:
|||| You need to purchase a "Retail Version" of Windows XP
|||| if you plan on making significant hardware changes in the
|||| future. An "OEM Version" is cheaper because its license
|||| is tied to the very first hardware configuration it is installed
|||| and activated on.
|||
||| As my PC is a non docked computer, and I won't be changing the NIC
||| (connected to mobo) would that will give me 5 changes before I have
||| to re-activate ? (i.e on the 6th one I would have to re-activate
||| which I can't do with an OEM copy)
|||
||| Upgrading my DVD-Writers firmware has already used one change!
|||
||| After 120 (or I read somewhere 180) days will those changes go back
||| to zero on an OEM copy.
|||
||| Also can I format my drive and re-install windows when ever I want.
||| I read on one website that if I have activated within the last 120
||| days on the same computer, then I have to ring up Microsoft to get
||| another activation code, even though I'm still using the same
||| hardware??
|||
||
|| I don't know what or where you're reading these things, but you're
|| getting yourself in a froth for no reason. You can upgrade your
|| computer as often as you want. If you hit a point where the computer
|| says you have to reactivate, you do it online or by phone. At the
|| worst, you talk to a rep, tell them that you upgraded, repaired,
|| formatted your hard drive, whatever it might be, and they let you
|| activate. No big deal.
|
| I think I'm mostly reading old stuff off google.
| I've confirmed they will with a Retail copy, but I have a OEM copy.
|
| Carey Frisch above says
| "You need to purchase a "Retail Version" of Windows XP if you plan on
| making significant hardware changes in the future. An "OEM Version"
| is cheaper because its license
| is tied to the very first hardware configuration it is installed and
| activated on."
|
| But Jupiter Jones (thats got to be the coolest name ever!) says I
| shouldn't have any problem.
|
| I just dont want to buy a load of upgrades then find out I can't
| re-activate. Then either have to buy another £60 OEM copy or £160
| Retail copy.

http://www.microscum.com/carey/
Anonymous
February 20, 2005 2:40:14 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Fugwump wrote:

>Then I read about how someone bought a new motherboard and CPU and needed to
>reactivate, rang up Microsoft but because it was an OEM copy it was deemed
>as being installed on a different computer. Yet it seems with the retail
>version you could reactivate.
>
>This has got to be the stupidest idea ever!! Whilst I can afford to upgrade
>hardware, I can't or won't buy something I already have just because I've
>upgraded, would more likely put the effort into learning Linux than forking
>out more cash. Also means if too many of my parts go wrong I could have to
>buy another copy too.

Windows is licensed for use on a single machine. There are two forms -
a 'retail' one that includes rights to transfer, and the OEM one. The
OEM saves money but is licensed solely to the machine where first
installed and may NOT be transferred

--
Alex Nichol MS MVP (Windows Technologies)
Bournemouth, U.K. Alexn@mvps.D8E8L.org (remove the D8 bit)
!