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Motherboard replacement XP Headache

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February 21, 2005 10:35:09 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

My new DVD burner would not read or recognize CDs so I removed it from
my system for replacement. My system would not boot or even recognize
my hard drives. I removed one of my hard drives and put it into an
external USB case and was able to read it on my laptop. My conclusion
was that I had a motherboard failure. I replaced my Asrock K7S8X with
the Asrock K7VT6 (closest shipping model) and still had the boot
problem. Turned out that my drive was jumpered for Master w/ Slave
present and since I removed the DVD system would not recognize HD so I
jumpered HD to Master w/ no slave present. Now since I has the newer
motherboard installed I figured I would use it.

I ran Ghost to restore my last backup and system would not come up but
continue to reboot. After checking on Google I found out one cannot
expect XP to run after a major hardware change so I did a XP repair
from the XP CDs. The result - BSOD (Blue screen) on boot.

I went back to my old motherboard, ran Ghost and all is well. My
question is. If I want to, in the future, upgrade my system, what steps
should I do? What backup program would allow a restore to another
install of windows XP without me having to reinstall all my programs? I
was so content with Ghost until I had to use it (granted it worked in
the long run with the reinstallation of my motherboard).
February 21, 2005 10:50:55 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

But how would I recover all my programs and data files? Example, my
outlook express emails etc... Would Windows XP backup/restore survive a
motherboard change? Or is there some third party backup/restore tool
allow a cleaner migration between systems.

Marty
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
February 21, 2005 11:20:23 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I do this every day for a living. Invest in a portable hard drive. Copy all
your data to the portable drive, format and install Windows on your main
drive, install programs, copy the data from the portable drive. If you don't
have the knowledge or time to do it, take it to a profesional. Make sure
they understand that you need your data saved and get a firm quote in
advance. If they can't give you firm quote look elsewhere. They don't really
know what they're doing. They will need your Windows and program CD's and
associated keys. If a repair install didn't work this is the only method I
know that works for sure. Depending on the programs are involved I would
charge $75.00 to $200.00. It's usually $100.00 for most configurations.

Kerry Brown
KDB Systems

"Marty" <martin.burger@pobox.com> wrote in message
news:1109044255.126408.215460@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> But how would I recover all my programs and data files? Example, my
> outlook express emails etc... Would Windows XP backup/restore survive a
> motherboard change? Or is there some third party backup/restore tool
> allow a cleaner migration between systems.
>
> Marty
>
Related resources
February 22, 2005 2:20:17 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Marty" <martin.burger@pobox.com> wrote in message
news:1109044255.126408.215460@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> But how would I recover all my programs and data files? Example, my
> outlook express emails etc... Would Windows XP backup/restore survive a
> motherboard change? Or is there some third party backup/restore tool
> allow a cleaner migration between systems.
>
> Marty
>

In the situation you describe, a repair install would save all your things
anyway. But, anything can go wrong (like a power outage during a repair).
Back up anything important to you on CDR(W)s, or to an external drive.

As for Lamethos stating that a full install is better, that is hogwash, and
only reality, if the repair doesn't go correctly. You can always do a repair
install, and if it works, then you are good (except, you will have to get
updates from Windows again, depending on what Service Pack you have with the
install disk). If the repair doesn't work, then you'll have lost only around
15-20 minutes time, and then do a (the) full install.
February 22, 2005 3:15:02 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

In news:1109043309.574919.47530@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com,
Marty <martin.burger@pobox.com> had this to say:

> I went back to my old motherboard, ran Ghost and all is well. My
> question is. If I want to, in the future, upgrade my system, what
> steps should I do? What backup program would allow a restore to
> another install of windows XP without me having to reinstall all my
> programs? I was so content with Ghost until I had to use it (granted
> it worked in the long run with the reinstallation of my motherboard).

Take a trip here, scroll down, and you'll find what you want to know:

http://www.experts-exchange.com/Operating_Systems/WinXP...

Mainly the system preperation bits are what you're interested in.

Galen
--

"My mind rebels at stagnation. Give me problems, give me work, give me
the most abstruse cryptogram or the most intricate analysis, and I am
in my own proper atmosphere. I can dispense then with artificial
stimulants. But I abhor the dull routine of existence. I crave for
mental exaltation." -- Sherlock Holmes
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
February 22, 2005 6:34:41 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

On Mon, 21 Feb 2005 19:35:09 -0800, Marty wrote:
>
> I went back to my old motherboard, ran Ghost and all is well. My
> question is. If I want to, in the future, upgrade my system, what steps
> should I do? What backup program would allow a restore to another
> install of windows XP without me having to reinstall all my programs? I
> was so content with Ghost until I had to use it (granted it worked in
> the long run with the reinstallation of my motherboard).

In general, when you change a motherboard and other hardware at the same
time, it's best to do a proper full install. There are ways to do just a
repair/reinstall, but I've always found it better to just do a full
install on the new motherboard.

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Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
February 22, 2005 8:49:21 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

It's the old story; backup and backup and backup, 'cause you'll never know
when it's going to strike you.
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
February 22, 2005 9:50:16 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

>
> I don't know why any can suggest otherwise.
>
Because the OP stated he had already tried a repair install and it didn't
work. 95% of the time a repair install works fine. Occasionally it doesn't
and you have to choose the backup and reinstall route. Granted he had done
an extra step by using Ghost but that shouldn't have affected the outcome.
At least he has his original Ghost image and can get back to where he
started.

Kerry Brown
KDB Systems
February 22, 2005 1:48:06 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Galen, thanks! Even though I was able to get my desktop up and running
by restoring my old motherboard, it is good to know that there is a
fighting chance of doing a restore. I am tempted to do a ghost backup
on another system then a ghost restore of my current system using the
information from the Sysprep articles and see if I can get the other
system up and running. Then I will do a ghost restore to conclude the
excersize.

I have a flakey Sony Vaio Laptop that I will be putting to pasture once
I get my HP AMD 64 laptop delivered. If I can restore my Desktop AMD
system to my Vaio PII 333 laptop - if the restore works (to the extent
that there is a vast difference in hardware - TV Tuner etc), then I
know that all is not lost.

Marty
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
February 22, 2005 3:24:25 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

On Mon, 21 Feb 2005 23:20:17 -0500, Tom wrote:

>
> "Marty" <martin.burger@pobox.com> wrote in message
> news:1109044255.126408.215460@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>> But how would I recover all my programs and data files? Example, my
>> outlook express emails etc... Would Windows XP backup/restore survive a
>> motherboard change? Or is there some third party backup/restore tool
>> allow a cleaner migration between systems.
>>
>> Marty
>>
>
> In the situation you describe, a repair install would save all your things
> anyway. But, anything can go wrong (like a power outage during a repair).
> Back up anything important to you on CDR(W)s, or to an external drive.
>
> As for Lamethos stating that a full install is better, that is hogwash, and
> only reality, if the repair doesn't go correctly. You can always do a repair
> install, and if it works, then you are good (except, you will have to get
> updates from Windows again, depending on what Service Pack you have with the
> install disk). If the repair doesn't work, then you'll have lost only around
> 15-20 minutes time, and then do a (the) full install.

Nice, since your scope of installations is very limited you resort to
insults when you can't provide any useful information.

A change in motherboard, while it can be done with a repair/reinstall as I
clearly stated, is best done with a full reinstall due to the number of
changes in drivers and other functions.

As for saving the data, there are many ways to BACKUP a system, and most
people SHOULD be doing that already. There is also the option of
purchasing a second drive and installing the OS on it and then moving the
data from the first drive to the new one.

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February 22, 2005 3:44:02 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Leythos" <void@nowhere.lan> wrote in message
news:p an.2005.02.22.12.28.43.616977@nowhere.lan...
> On Mon, 21 Feb 2005 23:20:17 -0500, Tom wrote:
>
>>
>> "Marty" <martin.burger@pobox.com> wrote in message
>> news:1109044255.126408.215460@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>>> But how would I recover all my programs and data files? Example, my
>>> outlook express emails etc... Would Windows XP backup/restore survive a
>>> motherboard change? Or is there some third party backup/restore tool
>>> allow a cleaner migration between systems.
>>>
>>> Marty
>>>
>>
>> In the situation you describe, a repair install would save all your
>> things
>> anyway. But, anything can go wrong (like a power outage during a repair).
>> Back up anything important to you on CDR(W)s, or to an external drive.
>>
>> As for Lamethos stating that a full install is better, that is hogwash,
>> and
>> only reality, if the repair doesn't go correctly. You can always do a
>> repair
>> install, and if it works, then you are good (except, you will have to get
>> updates from Windows again, depending on what Service Pack you have with
>> the
>> install disk). If the repair doesn't work, then you'll have lost only
>> around
>> 15-20 minutes time, and then do a (the) full install.
>
> Nice, since your scope of installations is very limited you resort to
> insults when you can't provide any useful information.

Like calling people pirates and thieves!

>
> A change in motherboard, while it can be done with a repair/reinstall as I
> clearly stated, is best done with a full reinstall due to the number of
> changes in drivers and other functions.

HUH? You make a comment about my "limited scope of installations", that
remark shows that it should pertain to you. A MOBO has nothing to do with
the OS and drivers, only posting, loading the hardware before Windows comes
into play. There are NO drivers that Windows uses for a MOBO, as it can't!

You need to read up what a repair install actually does to the OS when
performed.
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
February 22, 2005 5:53:00 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

On Mon, 21 Feb 2005 23:20:17 -0500, "Tom" <noway@nothere.com> wrote:

>As for Lamethos stating that a full install is better, that is hogwash, and
>only reality, if the repair doesn't go correctly. You can always do a repair
>install, and if it works, then you are good (except, you will have to get
>updates from Windows again, depending on what Service Pack you have with the
>install disk). If the repair doesn't work, then you'll have lost only around
>15-20 minutes time, and then do a (the) full install.

FYI, you don't ALWAYS have to get all the post sp service packs again.
I installed SP2 the day it came out - and there were several
hotfixes/updates released since then. Two weeks ago I put in a new
mainboard/processor/memory/hard drive upgrade, and did a repair
install using my XP SP2 slipstream CD I made right after SP2 was
released.

Guess how many updates I had to reinstall afterwards: NONE. Every
post SP2 update was still there and functioning.
February 22, 2005 6:38:13 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

>> On Mon, 21 Feb 2005 23:20:17 -0500, Tom wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> "Marty" <martin.burger@pobox.com> wrote in message
>>> news:1109044255.126408.215460@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>>>> But how would I recover all my programs and data files? Example, my
>>>> outlook express emails etc... Would Windows XP backup/restore survive a
>>>> motherboard change? Or is there some third party backup/restore tool
>>>> allow a cleaner migration between systems.
>>>>
>>>> Marty
>>>>
>>>

"Tom" <noway@nothere.com> wrote in message
news:o UHCaYQGFHA.1836@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>>> In the situation you describe, a repair install would save all your
>>> things anyway. But, anything can go wrong (like a power outage during a
>>> repair). Back up anything important to you on CDR(W)s, or to an external
>>> drive.
>>> As for Lamethos stating that a full install is better, that is hogwash,
>>> and only reality, if the repair doesn't go correctly. You can always do
>>> a repair install, and if it works, then you are good (except, you will
>>> have to get
>>> updates from Windows again, depending on what Service Pack you have with
>>> the install disk). If the repair doesn't work, then you'll have lost
>>> only around 15-20 minutes time, and then do a (the) full install.
>>

> "Leythos" <void@nowhere.lan> wrote in message
> news:p an.2005.02.22.12.28.43.616977@nowhere.lan...
>> A change in motherboard, while it can be done with a repair/reinstall as
>> I
>> clearly stated, is best done with a full reinstall due to the number of
>> changes in drivers and other functions.

Tom responds to the above...
> HUH? You make a comment about my "limited scope of installations", that
> remark shows that it should pertain to you. A MOBO has nothing to do with
> the OS and drivers, only posting, loading the hardware before Windows
> comes > into play. There are NO drivers that Windows uses for a MOBO, as
> it can't!
>
> You need to read up what a repair install actually does to the OS when
> performed.

And now Leythos...
> I got news for you, but the motherboard does indeed matter to Windows and
> how it's accessed - ever hear of Chipset drivers, how about SCSI drivers,
> how about IDE/SATA chipset drivers, how about Video (integrated) drivers,
> how about USB drivers.... It has a lot to do with Windows OS.
> You should really read up on how Windows talks to components and
> chip-sets.

Tom responds...
(Snip)XP doesn't REMOVE those drivers during a repair install,
you idiot! That is why I made the comment about the MOBO. XP redectects
everything that is needed, like an install, only preserving personal
settings and other installed programs. IT WILL NOT REMOVE DRIVERS ALREADY
INSTALLED. One only has to update the system again from WINDOWS UPDATES. I
gave you the effin' link to read what a repair install entails, but (as
usual) you fail to avail yourself to such documentation.


Marty:
I hope you're not too terribly confused by all this but you would do well to
hearken unto Tom. He's right on the mark with the advice he's given you (and
I trust, others). There's absolutely no reason why you shouldn't attempt a
Repair install of XP following a motherboard change (or for that matter, any
major component change that results in a failure to boot following the
change). As a matter of fact in a significant number of cases (based upon my
experience) there is a possibility that notwithstanding the fact that a user
has installed a different make/model motherboard from your current one, your
computer *will* boot, thus avoiding the necessity of a Repair install.
There's no telling beforehand. In a fair minority of cases, our experience
has been that the computer booted after a motherboard change and no Repair
install was necessary.

But the likely scenario is that the computer will *not* boot following a
motherboard change and a Repair install of XP will be necessary. As Tom (and
perhaps one or two others responding to your query) has pointed out, there
is simply no absolute need to (in effect) reformat your HD and make a fresh
install of XP merely because of a change in motherboards. In our experience,
the Repair install works fine in this case.

A Google search of "xp repair install" or some such will point you to a
wealth of information as to performing a Repair install.
Anna
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
February 22, 2005 6:38:14 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
news:%23eljw5RGFHA.2932@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>
> But the likely scenario is that the computer will *not* boot following a
> motherboard change and a Repair install of XP will be necessary. As Tom
> (and perhaps one or two others responding to your query) has pointed out,
> there is simply no absolute need to (in effect) reformat your HD and make
> a fresh install of XP merely because of a change in motherboards. In our
> experience, the Repair install works fine in this case.
>

Does anyone read the OP? :-) He said he had tried a repair install. It
didn't work. Before the repair it would reboot itself. After the repair he
got the BSOD. If the repair install doesn't work it may be worthwhile trying
it once more but then a full clean install is the next option. I don't think
anyone recommended a full install as the first step after installing a
motherboard.

Kerry Brown
KDB Systems
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
February 22, 2005 8:44:53 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

On Tue, 22 Feb 2005 12:44:02 -0500, Tom wrote:

> HUH? You make a comment about my "limited scope of installations", that
> remark shows that it should pertain to you. A MOBO has nothing to do with
> the OS and drivers, only posting, loading the hardware before Windows comes
> into play. There are NO drivers that Windows uses for a MOBO, as it can't!

I got news for you, but the motherboard does indeed matter to Windows and
how it's accessed - ever hear of Chipset drivers, how about SCSI drivers,
how about IDE/SATA chipset drivers, how about Video (integrated) drivers,
how about USB drivers.... It has a lot to do with Windows OS.

> You need to read up what a repair install actually does to the OS when
> performed.

You should really read up on how Windows talks to components and chip-sets.

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February 22, 2005 8:44:54 PM

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"Leythos" <void@nowhere.lan> wrote in message
news:p an.2005.02.22.17.49.12.4817@nowhere.lan...
> On Tue, 22 Feb 2005 12:44:02 -0500, Tom wrote:
>
>> HUH? You make a comment about my "limited scope of installations", that
>> remark shows that it should pertain to you. A MOBO has nothing to do with
>> the OS and drivers, only posting, loading the hardware before Windows
>> comes
>> into play. There are NO drivers that Windows uses for a MOBO, as it
>> can't!
>
> I got news for you, but the motherboard does indeed matter to Windows and
> how it's accessed - ever hear of Chipset drivers, how about SCSI drivers,
> how about IDE/SATA chipset drivers, how about Video (integrated) drivers,
> how about USB drivers.... It has a lot to do with Windows OS.
>
>> You need to read up what a repair install actually does to the OS when
>> performed.
>
> You should really read up on how Windows talks to components and
> chip-sets.
>

Bwahahahahahahaha! XP doesn't REMOVE those drivers during a repair install,
you idiot! That is why I made the comment about the MOBO. XP redectects
everything that is needed, like an install, only preserving personal
settings and other installed programs. IT WILL NOT REMOVE DRIVERS ALREADY
INSTALLED. One only has to update the system again from WINDOWS UPDATES. I
gave you the effin' link to read what a repair install entails, but (as
usual) you fail to avail yourself to such documentation.
February 22, 2005 8:55:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
> news:%23eljw5RGFHA.2932@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>>
>> But the likely scenario is that the computer will *not* boot following a
>> motherboard change and a Repair install of XP will be necessary. As Tom
>> (and perhaps one or two others responding to your query) has pointed out,
>> there is simply no absolute need to (in effect) reformat your HD and make
>> a fresh install of XP merely because of a change in motherboards. In our
>> experience, the Repair install works fine in this case.


"Kerry Brown" <kerry@kdbNOSPAMsystems.c*o*m> wrote in message
news:o fpRtcSGFHA.2032@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> Does anyone read the OP? :-) He said he had tried a repair install. It
> didn't work. Before the repair it would reboot itself. After the repair he
> got the BSOD. If the repair install doesn't work it may be worthwhile
> trying it once more but then a full clean install is the next option. I
> don't think anyone recommended a full install as the first step after
> installing a motherboard.
>
> Kerry Brown
> KDB Systems


Kerry:
You're absolutely correct about the OP's statement concerning the failed
Repair attempt. But the thread had subsequently evolved into a rather
contentious argument over the question as to whether a fresh install of the
XP OS was necessary following a motherboard change or whether a Repair
install was the desired route at that point. And that's what we were
discussing (arguing about?). And it is indeed a topic worth discussing
because of the misinformation and outright distortion one frequently comes
across in this and other newsgroups concerning this subject.
Anna
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
February 23, 2005 12:45:17 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

On Tue, 22 Feb 2005 13:29:05 -0500, Tom wrote:

> Bwahahahahahahaha! XP doesn't REMOVE those drivers during a repair install,
> you idiot! That is why I made the comment about the MOBO. XP redectects

Nowhere did I suggest that XP removed the drivers.

> everything that is needed, like an install, only preserving personal
> settings and other installed programs. IT WILL NOT REMOVE DRIVERS ALREADY
> INSTALLED. One only has to update the system again from WINDOWS UPDATES. I
> gave you the effin' link to read what a repair install entails, but (as
> usual) you fail to avail yourself to such documentation.

And the reinstall may not always work due to issues of drivers that are
not available for the NEW motherboard, which means that there are times
when a full reinstall is needed. You appear to think that the NEW
motherboard was exactly the same as the old one, and if it was it would
have just been a simple swap without the need for repair/reinstall, but it
does not appear to be exactly the same board.

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February 23, 2005 12:45:18 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Leythos" <void@nowhere.lan> wrote in message
news:p an.2005.02.22.21.48.18.143817@nowhere.lan...
> On Tue, 22 Feb 2005 13:29:05 -0500, Tom wrote:
>
>> Bwahahahahahahaha! XP doesn't REMOVE those drivers during a repair
>> install,
>> you idiot! That is why I made the comment about the MOBO. XP redectects
>
> Nowhere did I suggest that XP removed the drivers.

Oh dear! density meter almost hits a 10 on the hardness scale on this one,
but I am going to give you benefit of an education here.


>
>> everything that is needed, like an install, only preserving personal
>> settings and other installed programs. IT WILL NOT REMOVE DRIVERS ALREADY
>> INSTALLED. One only has to update the system again from WINDOWS UPDATES.
>> I
>> gave you the effin' link to read what a repair install entails, but (as
>> usual) you fail to avail yourself to such documentation.
>
> And the reinstall may not always work due to issues of drivers that are
> not available for the NEW motherboard, which means that there are times
> when a full reinstall is needed. You appear to think that the NEW
> motherboard was exactly the same as the old one, and if it was it would
> have just been a simple swap without the need for repair/reinstall, but it
> does not appear to be exactly the same board.
>

Wow, your logic is terrible!! But here goes---

You say he may need new drivers, and hint, that installing a new MOBO may
require that for the chipset, OK. Do you think XP will not run, if the
updated drivers are not there? If so, then one absolutely cannot run
Windows, right? OK!

NO matter what the MOBO, Windows will install default drivers for the
chipset, it is then up to the PC person to install updated drivers for it,
and YOU CAN ONLY DO THAT WHILE IN WINDOWS! get it? So, regardless of whether
one does an inplace install (repair, or fresh install, the proper drivers
are used, to then be updated accordingly)

In the OPs case, he doesn't need new drivers since he was able to retain the
original MOBO, but that doesn't mean one cannot do a repair install (or any
install) with the updated drivers, or one couldn't get into any kind of
install of Windows. If you cannot see the total fallacy of your argument,
then that is again how you think things work, regardless of how they do in
the real world.
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
February 23, 2005 12:46:28 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

On Tue, 22 Feb 2005 15:38:13 -0500, Anna wrote:
>
> But the likely scenario is that the computer will *not* boot following a
> motherboard change and a Repair install of XP will be necessary. As Tom (and
> perhaps one or two others responding to your query) has pointed out, there
> is simply no absolute need to (in effect) reformat your HD and make a fresh
> install of XP merely because of a change in motherboards. In our experience,
> the Repair install works fine in this case.

Did you miss the part where the OP already stated that the repair didn't
work?

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Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
February 23, 2005 1:24:31 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

On Tue, 22 Feb 2005 17:28:12 -0500, Tom wrote:

> So what! This does not address your contention that drivers are needed for
> Windows to work with the new chipsets that come on another MOBO. I addressed
> your logic as totally fallacy, and as usual, you avoid it!

Since the motherboard has chipsets for SATA and/or Promise devices, and
since those are not supported in the shipped XP CD, where do you think XP
Repair/Reinstall is going to get them?

It clearly addresses that there are some hardware built into motherboards
that is not directly supported by XP and that can even keep the system
from booting without additional drivers.

My guess is that you're use to working with older computers and not
anything in the last years production and absolutely not servers.


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February 23, 2005 1:24:32 AM

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"Leythos" <void@nowhere.lan> wrote in message
news:p an.2005.02.22.22.33.41.328201@nowhere.lan...
> On Tue, 22 Feb 2005 17:28:12 -0500, Tom wrote:
>
>> So what! This does not address your contention that drivers are needed
>> for
>> Windows to work with the new chipsets that come on another MOBO. I
>> addressed
>> your logic as totally fallacy, and as usual, you avoid it!
>
> Since the motherboard has chipsets for SATA and/or Promise devices, and
> since those are not supported in the shipped XP CD, where do you think XP
> Repair/Reinstall is going to get them?
>
> It clearly addresses that there are some hardware built into motherboards
> that is not directly supported by XP and that can even keep the system
> from booting without additional drivers.

Again, HITF does one install the drivers without being in Windows, this is
the point your dense effin skull cannot absorb!

> My guess is that you're use to working with older computers and not
> anything in the last years production and absolutely not servers.

Your guess is totally wrong, and servers have nothing to do with drivers in
the case here. get a life, and get off your high horse, that one who doesn't
run a server, doesn't know operating systems. But my guess is that you are
liar when it comes to how workstations and servers you say you actually use
for home use, considering your inability to address your contradiction, or
your avoidance to find fault in your thinking.
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
February 23, 2005 1:40:16 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

On Tue, 22 Feb 2005 17:40:20 -0500, Tom wrote:
>
> Again, HITF does one install the drivers without being in Windows, this is
> the point your dense effin skull cannot absorb!

You're really showing your ignorance - you are not in "Windows" when you
press F6 to install drivers during the initial setup, before Windows
launches.

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Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
February 23, 2005 1:54:07 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

On Tue, 22 Feb 2005 17:55:03 -0500, Anna wrote:
>
> And it is indeed a topic worth discussing
> because of the misinformation and outright distortion one frequently comes
> across in this and other newsgroups concerning this subject.

Anna - have you ever experienced a repair that didn't get the computer
back up and running? I have.

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February 23, 2005 1:54:08 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Leythos" <void@nowhere.lan> wrote in message
news:p an.2005.02.22.22.58.26.194886@nowhere.lan...
> On Tue, 22 Feb 2005 17:55:03 -0500, Anna wrote:
>>
>> And it is indeed a topic worth discussing
>> because of the misinformation and outright distortion one frequently
>> comes
>> across in this and other newsgroups concerning this subject.
>
> Anna - have you ever experienced a repair that didn't get the computer
> back up and running? I have.
>
> --
> spam999free@rrohio.com
> remove 999 in order to email me

Leythos:
This is fast becoming (nay, it already has become!) "the theatre of the
absurd". Of course I've experienced a Repair installation that failed. No
doubt thousands upon thousands of XP users have also experienced a failed
Repair install. That's not the question and I suspect you know that. The
point is that you try it, I say try it!, before going through the trauma of
a fresh install of the OS on a reformatted hard drive. In most cases the
Repair install will work, i.e., you'll be able to boot to a working drive.
What in heaven's name is the harm of trying this? If it doesn't work, we go
to Plan B, no?
Anna
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
February 23, 2005 1:54:09 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
news:%23vKA7kTGFHA.3732@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> This is fast becoming (nay, it already has become!) "the theatre of the
> absurd". Of course I've experienced a Repair installation that failed. No
> doubt thousands upon thousands of XP users have also experienced a failed
> Repair install.

LOL it is becoming absurd. A simple question turns into a bunch of experts
aguing over who has done the most motherboard upgrades while agreeing on the
fact that a repair install doesn't always work. Maybe we should all be out
installing motherboards :-)

Cheers,
Kerry Brown
KDB Systems
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
February 23, 2005 3:33:38 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

On Tue, 22 Feb 2005 18:50:00 -0500, Anna wrote:
>
> This is fast becoming (nay, it already has become!) "the theatre of the
> absurd". Of course I've experienced a Repair installation that failed. No
> doubt thousands upon thousands of XP users have also experienced a failed
> Repair install. That's not the question and I suspect you know that. The
> point is that you try it, I say try it!, before going through the trauma of
> a fresh install of the OS on a reformatted hard drive. In most cases the
> Repair install will work, i.e., you'll be able to boot to a working drive.
> What in heaven's name is the harm of trying this? If it doesn't work, we go
> to Plan B, no?

Anna, I never advocated doing a wipe/reinstall as the first step, in fact,
I read the users post where he stated that he had already tried it and
failed. I also said that in many cases where a motherboard is changed the
only way to get it working is to wipe/reinstall. Notice that I still don't
and didn't advocate doing a wipe/reinstall as a first step, not even a
second, I just stated that it sometimes happens that you have to do it
that way.

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Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
February 23, 2005 2:59:23 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

On Tue, 22 Feb 2005 23:05:14 -0500, Tom wrote:
>
> I am not going to go over the fact that is what you said, and now you
> change it up to cover the gormless person that you are.

That's because what I said wasn't wrong, I' have not changed anything I
said, you just assumed more than what I said. You know, if you were not
such as ass you might be easier to follow.

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February 23, 2005 4:09:26 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Before I did the repair I did a fresh install of XP on my new
motherboard to make sure that XP did recognize my configuration and it
did. I at a loss as to why repair did not work. If I had more time to
play I would do as follows -

1) Ghost my current configuration
2) "Uninstall" all my devices via device manager
3) Shutdown and Ghost configuration (I have 2 spare drives that I use
for Ghost (backup) purposes which I alternate)
3) Swap motherboards
4) Do a repair instalation

If that works then my backup stratergy would be as follows -

1) Ghost current configuration
2) "Uninstall" all my devices via device manager
3) Shutdown and Ghost configuration
4) Reload via Ghost configuration from step #1

This way I have two backups - one for a restore of current
configuration - and another in case of a motherboard failure or system
upgrade
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
March 4, 2005 5:16:17 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Marty wrote:
> My new DVD burner would not read or recognize CDs so I removed it from
> my system for replacement. My system would not boot or even recognize
> my hard drives. I removed one of my hard drives and put it into an
> external USB case and was able to read it on my laptop. My conclusion
> was that I had a motherboard failure. I replaced my Asrock K7S8X with
> the Asrock K7VT6 (closest shipping model) and still had the boot
> problem. Turned out that my drive was jumpered for Master w/ Slave
> present and since I removed the DVD system would not recognize HD so I
> jumpered HD to Master w/ no slave present. Now since I has the newer
> motherboard installed I figured I would use it.
>
> I ran Ghost to restore my last backup and system would not come up but
> continue to reboot. After checking on Google I found out one cannot
> expect XP to run after a major hardware change so I did a XP repair
> from the XP CDs. The result - BSOD (Blue screen) on boot.
>
> I went back to my old motherboard, ran Ghost and all is well. My
> question is. If I want to, in the future, upgrade my system, what steps
> should I do? What backup program would allow a restore to another
> install of windows XP without me having to reinstall all my programs? I
> was so content with Ghost until I had to use it (granted it worked in
> the long run with the reinstallation of my motherboard).
>

I always use major HW updates as a good reason to reinstall windows.
It's unbelievable how much swill one accumulates over just one year.

I keep all my data (even MyDocuments) on another partition. Before I
reinstall I make an empty space on my disk big enough for XP (10-20GB)
using Partition Magic. I install XP and SP2 AND then connect to the internet.
Then I install and update just the apps I really need. Since my data
is in another partition I ready to go as soon as I reboot.

/dan
March 4, 2005 11:08:51 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Daniel Ganek" <ganek@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:D 0ac61$snf$1@pcls4.std.com...
> Marty wrote:
>> My new DVD burner would not read or recognize CDs so I removed it from
>> my system for replacement. My system would not boot or even recognize
>> my hard drives. I removed one of my hard drives and put it into an
>> external USB case and was able to read it on my laptop. My conclusion
>> was that I had a motherboard failure. I replaced my Asrock K7S8X with
>> the Asrock K7VT6 (closest shipping model) and still had the boot
>> problem. Turned out that my drive was jumpered for Master w/ Slave
>> present and since I removed the DVD system would not recognize HD so I
>> jumpered HD to Master w/ no slave present. Now since I has the newer
>> motherboard installed I figured I would use it.
>>
>> I ran Ghost to restore my last backup and system would not come up but
>> continue to reboot. After checking on Google I found out one cannot
>> expect XP to run after a major hardware change so I did a XP repair
>> from the XP CDs. The result - BSOD (Blue screen) on boot.
>>
>> I went back to my old motherboard, ran Ghost and all is well. My
>> question is. If I want to, in the future, upgrade my system, what steps
>> should I do? What backup program would allow a restore to another
>> install of windows XP without me having to reinstall all my programs? I
>> was so content with Ghost until I had to use it (granted it worked in
>> the long run with the reinstallation of my motherboard).

Daniel:
If I understand your query correctly, you changed your motherboard thinking
it was defective (it turns out it wasn't as you later discovered) and after
the original change you performed a Repair install that didn't work in that
the system wouldn't boot. From the information you provided it's practically
impossible to determine why the Repair install failed. There are so many
reasons why it *could* fail, that it's just about impossible to tell at this
distance without knowing a great deal more about your system (including user
input) than we have now.

Anyway, you installed your old motherboard and the system boots. Now you're
asking how to backup your system so that if it ever goes down in the future
you can restore it. Obviously that means having a "cloned" copy of your
system at your disposal. The most practical approach in my view is to use a
disk imaging program such as Ghost to clone the contents of your working HD
to another HD. In your case you have two internal HDs so it's practical to
use the second HD as your backup. I know you say you used Ghost at one point
and for one reason or another the "system would not come up but continue to
reboot". Who can tell what happened? All I can tell you is that I've used
Ghost to clone HDs countless times and it's been virtually flawless in its
operation. Whenever I've come upon a user's problem with the Ghost program
it's been invariably due to either a corrupt source disk (cloning
"garbage"), a defective disk, or user error. In my experience it's been a
rare occurrence that the Ghost program failed. I assume you're using the
Ghost 2003 (or Ghost 9) version.

If you're still unhappy with the Ghost program, try another disk imaging
program such as Acronis True Image. I've had no meaningful experience with
that program but I have noticed that it gets very favorable reviews in the
PC magazines and from posters to the XP newsgroups.
Anna
March 8, 2005 8:19:42 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I am very happy with Ghost. It does exactly what it was intended to do.
My problem was Windows XP inability to handle the motherboard change -
a change from the SIS chipset to the VIA chipset. All the other
hardware was identical. The repair install process went through and the
system "blue screened" upon reboot. Since my problem turned out not to
be motherboard related my reinstallation of my old motherboard and the
restoration of my system via Ghost saved the day.

My current solution was to go on ebay (since the manufacture
discontinued production of my motherboard) and purchase another
motherboard. For $14 I now have a backup motherboard in case I do
indeed have a motherboard failure!

> If I understand your query correctly, you changed your motherboard
thinking
> it was defective (it turns out it wasn't as you later discovered) and
after
> the original change you performed a Repair install that didn't work
in that
> the system wouldn't boot. From the information you provided it's
practically
> impossible to determine why the Repair install failed. There are so
many
> reasons why it *could* fail, that it's just about impossible to tell
at this
> distance without knowing a great deal more about your system
(including user
> input) than we have now.
>
> Anyway, you installed your old motherboard and the system boots. Now
you're
> asking how to backup your system so that if it ever goes down in the
future
> you can restore it. Obviously that means having a "cloned" copy of
your
> system at your disposal. The most practical approach in my view is to
use a
> disk imaging program such as Ghost to clone the contents of your
working HD
> to another HD. In your case you have two internal HDs so it's
practical to
> use the second HD as your backup. I know you say you used Ghost at
one point
> and for one reason or another the "system would not come up but
continue to
> reboot". Who can tell what happened? All I can tell you is that I've
used
> Ghost to clone HDs countless times and it's been virtually flawless
in its
> operation. Whenever I've come upon a user's problem with the Ghost
program
> it's been invariably due to either a corrupt source disk (cloning
> "garbage"), a defective disk, or user error. In my experience it's
been a
> rare occurrence that the Ghost program failed. I assume you're using
the
> Ghost 2003 (or Ghost 9) version.
>
> If you're still unhappy with the Ghost program, try another disk
imaging
> program such as Acronis True Image. I've had no meaningful experience
with
> that program but I have noticed that it gets very favorable reviews
in the
> PC magazines and from posters to the XP newsgroups.
> Anna
March 8, 2005 7:25:48 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Hi,

Not familiar with Ghost but thinking about to purchase one and using for a
new installation of XP. Appreciate if you can advises.

Is it possible for Ghost to clone not the entire HD but certain applications
and then put it back into the newly installed Windows?

Also, is it possible just to clone some parts of Windows but not all?

The reason for my question is that I wish to have a clean installation of
Windows since the current one is quite mixed up with all the service packs,
patches, program installations and removal. Although it still works fine
but there are minor problems here and there once a while.

But on the other hand, I do not wish to reinstall "all" applications and go
through all of the program configurations and set up again because I do have
many applications installed.

If I clone the entire CD, it will be the same as the existing one which
makes no sense for the clean installation again. So I just wish to clone
some applications and settings and wondering if that's possible.

Thanks in advance.


"Anna" <myname@myisp.net> ???????:o ymCo$RIFHA.1392@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> "Daniel Ganek" <ganek@comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:D 0ac61$snf$1@pcls4.std.com...
>> Marty wrote:
>>> My new DVD burner would not read or recognize CDs so I removed it from
>>> my system for replacement. My system would not boot or even recognize
>>> my hard drives. I removed one of my hard drives and put it into an
>>> external USB case and was able to read it on my laptop. My conclusion
>>> was that I had a motherboard failure. I replaced my Asrock K7S8X with
>>> the Asrock K7VT6 (closest shipping model) and still had the boot
>>> problem. Turned out that my drive was jumpered for Master w/ Slave
>>> present and since I removed the DVD system would not recognize HD so I
>>> jumpered HD to Master w/ no slave present. Now since I has the newer
>>> motherboard installed I figured I would use it.
>>>
>>> I ran Ghost to restore my last backup and system would not come up but
>>> continue to reboot. After checking on Google I found out one cannot
>>> expect XP to run after a major hardware change so I did a XP repair
>>> from the XP CDs. The result - BSOD (Blue screen) on boot.
>>>
>>> I went back to my old motherboard, ran Ghost and all is well. My
>>> question is. If I want to, in the future, upgrade my system, what steps
>>> should I do? What backup program would allow a restore to another
>>> install of windows XP without me having to reinstall all my programs? I
>>> was so content with Ghost until I had to use it (granted it worked in
>>> the long run with the reinstallation of my motherboard).
>
> Daniel:
> If I understand your query correctly, you changed your motherboard
> thinking it was defective (it turns out it wasn't as you later discovered)
> and after the original change you performed a Repair install that didn't
> work in that the system wouldn't boot. From the information you provided
> it's practically impossible to determine why the Repair install failed.
> There are so many reasons why it *could* fail, that it's just about
> impossible to tell at this distance without knowing a great deal more
> about your system (including user input) than we have now.
>
> Anyway, you installed your old motherboard and the system boots. Now
> you're asking how to backup your system so that if it ever goes down in
> the future you can restore it. Obviously that means having a "cloned" copy
> of your system at your disposal. The most practical approach in my view is
> to use a disk imaging program such as Ghost to clone the contents of your
> working HD to another HD. In your case you have two internal HDs so it's
> practical to use the second HD as your backup. I know you say you used
> Ghost at one point and for one reason or another the "system would not
> come up but continue to reboot". Who can tell what happened? All I can
> tell you is that I've used Ghost to clone HDs countless times and it's
> been virtually flawless in its operation. Whenever I've come upon a user's
> problem with the Ghost program it's been invariably due to either a
> corrupt source disk (cloning "garbage"), a defective disk, or user error.
> In my experience it's been a rare occurrence that the Ghost program
> failed. I assume you're using the Ghost 2003 (or Ghost 9) version.
>
> If you're still unhappy with the Ghost program, try another disk imaging
> program such as Acronis True Image. I've had no meaningful experience with
> that program but I have noticed that it gets very favorable reviews in the
> PC magazines and from posters to the XP newsgroups.
> Anna
>
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
March 8, 2005 7:46:32 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Ghost can copy disks or partitions just well.
It can NOT (neither can any other program) copy ("clone") only an installed
program (with registry settings etc) or only parts of Windows.


--
Tumppi
Reply to group
=================================================
Most learned on nntp://news.mircosoft.com
Helsinki, Finland (remove _NOSPAM)
(translations from FI/SE not always accurate)
=================================================



"xfile" <cou-cou@remove.nospam.com> kirjoitti viestissä
news:eLxN0b7IFHA.2132@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Hi,
>
> Not familiar with Ghost but thinking about to purchase one and using for a
> new installation of XP. Appreciate if you can advises.
>
> Is it possible for Ghost to clone not the entire HD but certain
applications
> and then put it back into the newly installed Windows?
>
> Also, is it possible just to clone some parts of Windows but not all?
>
> The reason for my question is that I wish to have a clean installation of
> Windows since the current one is quite mixed up with all the service
packs,
> patches, program installations and removal. Although it still works fine
> but there are minor problems here and there once a while.
>
> But on the other hand, I do not wish to reinstall "all" applications and
go
> through all of the program configurations and set up again because I do
have
> many applications installed.
>
> If I clone the entire CD, it will be the same as the existing one which
> makes no sense for the clean installation again. So I just wish to clone
> some applications and settings and wondering if that's possible.
>
> Thanks in advance.
>
>
> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> ???????:o ymCo$RIFHA.1392@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> > "Daniel Ganek" <ganek@comcast.net> wrote in message
> > news:D 0ac61$snf$1@pcls4.std.com...
> >> Marty wrote:
> >>> My new DVD burner would not read or recognize CDs so I removed it from
> >>> my system for replacement. My system would not boot or even recognize
> >>> my hard drives. I removed one of my hard drives and put it into an
> >>> external USB case and was able to read it on my laptop. My conclusion
> >>> was that I had a motherboard failure. I replaced my Asrock K7S8X with
> >>> the Asrock K7VT6 (closest shipping model) and still had the boot
> >>> problem. Turned out that my drive was jumpered for Master w/ Slave
> >>> present and since I removed the DVD system would not recognize HD so I
> >>> jumpered HD to Master w/ no slave present. Now since I has the newer
> >>> motherboard installed I figured I would use it.
> >>>
> >>> I ran Ghost to restore my last backup and system would not come up but
> >>> continue to reboot. After checking on Google I found out one cannot
> >>> expect XP to run after a major hardware change so I did a XP repair
> >>> from the XP CDs. The result - BSOD (Blue screen) on boot.
> >>>
> >>> I went back to my old motherboard, ran Ghost and all is well. My
> >>> question is. If I want to, in the future, upgrade my system, what
steps
> >>> should I do? What backup program would allow a restore to another
> >>> install of windows XP without me having to reinstall all my programs?
I
> >>> was so content with Ghost until I had to use it (granted it worked in
> >>> the long run with the reinstallation of my motherboard).
> >
> > Daniel:
> > If I understand your query correctly, you changed your motherboard
> > thinking it was defective (it turns out it wasn't as you later
discovered)
> > and after the original change you performed a Repair install that didn't
> > work in that the system wouldn't boot. From the information you provided
> > it's practically impossible to determine why the Repair install failed.
> > There are so many reasons why it *could* fail, that it's just about
> > impossible to tell at this distance without knowing a great deal more
> > about your system (including user input) than we have now.
> >
> > Anyway, you installed your old motherboard and the system boots. Now
> > you're asking how to backup your system so that if it ever goes down in
> > the future you can restore it. Obviously that means having a "cloned"
copy
> > of your system at your disposal. The most practical approach in my view
is
> > to use a disk imaging program such as Ghost to clone the contents of
your
> > working HD to another HD. In your case you have two internal HDs so it's
> > practical to use the second HD as your backup. I know you say you used
> > Ghost at one point and for one reason or another the "system would not
> > come up but continue to reboot". Who can tell what happened? All I can
> > tell you is that I've used Ghost to clone HDs countless times and it's
> > been virtually flawless in its operation. Whenever I've come upon a
user's
> > problem with the Ghost program it's been invariably due to either a
> > corrupt source disk (cloning "garbage"), a defective disk, or user
error.
> > In my experience it's been a rare occurrence that the Ghost program
> > failed. I assume you're using the Ghost 2003 (or Ghost 9) version.
> >
> > If you're still unhappy with the Ghost program, try another disk imaging
> > program such as Acronis True Image. I've had no meaningful experience
with
> > that program but I have noticed that it gets very favorable reviews in
the
> > PC magazines and from posters to the XP newsgroups.
> > Anna
> >
>
>
March 9, 2005 11:45:38 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Hi,

Thanks and I guess it's an "either or" situation - either I clone the entire
disk or install one by one. That solves my puzzle :) 

"Thomas Wendell" <tumppiw_NOSPAM@hotmail.com>
???????:uaDai2%23IFHA.588@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> Ghost can copy disks or partitions just well.
> It can NOT (neither can any other program) copy ("clone") only an
> installed
> program (with registry settings etc) or only parts of Windows.
>
>
> --
> Tumppi
> Reply to group
> =================================================
> Most learned on nntp://news.mircosoft.com
> Helsinki, Finland (remove _NOSPAM)
> (translations from FI/SE not always accurate)
> =================================================
>
>
>
> "xfile" <cou-cou@remove.nospam.com> kirjoitti viestiss?
> news:eLxN0b7IFHA.2132@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>> Hi,
>>
>> Not familiar with Ghost but thinking about to purchase one and using for
>> a
>> new installation of XP. Appreciate if you can advises.
>>
>> Is it possible for Ghost to clone not the entire HD but certain
> applications
>> and then put it back into the newly installed Windows?
>>
>> Also, is it possible just to clone some parts of Windows but not all?
>>
>> The reason for my question is that I wish to have a clean installation of
>> Windows since the current one is quite mixed up with all the service
> packs,
>> patches, program installations and removal. Although it still works fine
>> but there are minor problems here and there once a while.
>>
>> But on the other hand, I do not wish to reinstall "all" applications and
> go
>> through all of the program configurations and set up again because I do
> have
>> many applications installed.
>>
>> If I clone the entire CD, it will be the same as the existing one which
>> makes no sense for the clean installation again. So I just wish to clone
>> some applications and settings and wondering if that's possible.
>>
>> Thanks in advance.
>>
>>
>> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net>
>> ???????:o ymCo$RIFHA.1392@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> > "Daniel Ganek" <ganek@comcast.net> wrote in message
>> > news:D 0ac61$snf$1@pcls4.std.com...
>> >> Marty wrote:
>> >>> My new DVD burner would not read or recognize CDs so I removed it
>> >>> from
>> >>> my system for replacement. My system would not boot or even recognize
>> >>> my hard drives. I removed one of my hard drives and put it into an
>> >>> external USB case and was able to read it on my laptop. My conclusion
>> >>> was that I had a motherboard failure. I replaced my Asrock K7S8X with
>> >>> the Asrock K7VT6 (closest shipping model) and still had the boot
>> >>> problem. Turned out that my drive was jumpered for Master w/ Slave
>> >>> present and since I removed the DVD system would not recognize HD so
>> >>> I
>> >>> jumpered HD to Master w/ no slave present. Now since I has the newer
>> >>> motherboard installed I figured I would use it.
>> >>>
>> >>> I ran Ghost to restore my last backup and system would not come up
>> >>> but
>> >>> continue to reboot. After checking on Google I found out one cannot
>> >>> expect XP to run after a major hardware change so I did a XP repair
>> >>> from the XP CDs. The result - BSOD (Blue screen) on boot.
>> >>>
>> >>> I went back to my old motherboard, ran Ghost and all is well. My
>> >>> question is. If I want to, in the future, upgrade my system, what
> steps
>> >>> should I do? What backup program would allow a restore to another
>> >>> install of windows XP without me having to reinstall all my programs?
> I
>> >>> was so content with Ghost until I had to use it (granted it worked in
>> >>> the long run with the reinstallation of my motherboard).
>> >
>> > Daniel:
>> > If I understand your query correctly, you changed your motherboard
>> > thinking it was defective (it turns out it wasn't as you later
> discovered)
>> > and after the original change you performed a Repair install that
>> > didn't
>> > work in that the system wouldn't boot. From the information you
>> > provided
>> > it's practically impossible to determine why the Repair install failed.
>> > There are so many reasons why it *could* fail, that it's just about
>> > impossible to tell at this distance without knowing a great deal more
>> > about your system (including user input) than we have now.
>> >
>> > Anyway, you installed your old motherboard and the system boots. Now
>> > you're asking how to backup your system so that if it ever goes down in
>> > the future you can restore it. Obviously that means having a "cloned"
> copy
>> > of your system at your disposal. The most practical approach in my view
> is
>> > to use a disk imaging program such as Ghost to clone the contents of
> your
>> > working HD to another HD. In your case you have two internal HDs so
>> > it's
>> > practical to use the second HD as your backup. I know you say you used
>> > Ghost at one point and for one reason or another the "system would not
>> > come up but continue to reboot". Who can tell what happened? All I can
>> > tell you is that I've used Ghost to clone HDs countless times and it's
>> > been virtually flawless in its operation. Whenever I've come upon a
> user's
>> > problem with the Ghost program it's been invariably due to either a
>> > corrupt source disk (cloning "garbage"), a defective disk, or user
> error.
>> > In my experience it's been a rare occurrence that the Ghost program
>> > failed. I assume you're using the Ghost 2003 (or Ghost 9) version.
>> >
>> > If you're still unhappy with the Ghost program, try another disk
>> > imaging
>> > program such as Acronis True Image. I've had no meaningful experience
> with
>> > that program but I have noticed that it gets very favorable reviews in
> the
>> > PC magazines and from posters to the XP newsgroups.
>> > Anna
>> >
>>
>>
>
>
March 9, 2005 11:51:35 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

It is said that the reason for Windows to require repair installation and
sometime re-activation for major hardware changes is because it holds the
original hardware configurations information during installation and by
doing so, its performance and reliability are better. Other people say, it
does this just part of preventing pirated installation.

If I remember correctly (from reading some articles previously), Windows
will attempt to read some unique MB information to determine if it's the
"original one" and I forgot how many or what exact types of information it
will read. I do know that it will read BIOS information, and sometime,
change BIOS itself will require a repair installation - it happened to me
and others.

So you may wish to update your backup MB BIOS before you put it to rescue
your system in the future.


"Marty" <martin.burger@pobox.com>
???????:1110287982.471816.160620@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>I am very happy with Ghost. It does exactly what it was intended to do.
> My problem was Windows XP inability to handle the motherboard change -
> a change from the SIS chipset to the VIA chipset. All the other
> hardware was identical. The repair install process went through and the
> system "blue screened" upon reboot. Since my problem turned out not to
> be motherboard related my reinstallation of my old motherboard and the
> restoration of my system via Ghost saved the day.
>
> My current solution was to go on ebay (since the manufacture
> discontinued production of my motherboard) and purchase another
> motherboard. For $14 I now have a backup motherboard in case I do
> indeed have a motherboard failure!
>
>> If I understand your query correctly, you changed your motherboard
> thinking
>> it was defective (it turns out it wasn't as you later discovered) and
> after
>> the original change you performed a Repair install that didn't work
> in that
>> the system wouldn't boot. From the information you provided it's
> practically
>> impossible to determine why the Repair install failed. There are so
> many
>> reasons why it *could* fail, that it's just about impossible to tell
> at this
>> distance without knowing a great deal more about your system
> (including user
>> input) than we have now.
>>
>> Anyway, you installed your old motherboard and the system boots. Now
> you're
>> asking how to backup your system so that if it ever goes down in the
> future
>> you can restore it. Obviously that means having a "cloned" copy of
> your
>> system at your disposal. The most practical approach in my view is to
> use a
>> disk imaging program such as Ghost to clone the contents of your
> working HD
>> to another HD. In your case you have two internal HDs so it's
> practical to
>> use the second HD as your backup. I know you say you used Ghost at
> one point
>> and for one reason or another the "system would not come up but
> continue to
>> reboot". Who can tell what happened? All I can tell you is that I've
> used
>> Ghost to clone HDs countless times and it's been virtually flawless
> in its
>> operation. Whenever I've come upon a user's problem with the Ghost
> program
>> it's been invariably due to either a corrupt source disk (cloning
>> "garbage"), a defective disk, or user error. In my experience it's
> been a
>> rare occurrence that the Ghost program failed. I assume you're using
> the
>> Ghost 2003 (or Ghost 9) version.
>>
>> If you're still unhappy with the Ghost program, try another disk
> imaging
>> program such as Acronis True Image. I've had no meaningful experience
> with
>> that program but I have noticed that it gets very favorable reviews
> in the
>> PC magazines and from posters to the XP newsgroups.
>> Anna
>
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
March 15, 2005 2:49:32 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

On Tue, 15 Mar 2005 05:12:03 -0500, Trent© wrote:
>
> On Wed, 09 Mar 2005 23:39:20 GMT, Leythos <void@nowhere.lan> wrote:
>
>>> MSFT is just plain stupid.
>>
>>Nope, it works fine based on the drivers it's installed with at the time
>>of hardware detection. Even Linux won't moved across chipset/platforms
>>without changing drivers. Same for HPUX, AIX, SCO, etc...
>
> I can regularly produce STOP errors in 2k and xp simply by changing
> the buss speed. Its simply a stupid idea.

If the bus speed is within spec of the parts, then it will have no impact
on the system. If the bus speed change causes parts to operate outside of
the spec, then it really has little to do with the OS. The OS will not
make improperly configured hardware work by some form of magic.

>>> Many OS's...including earlier version of Windows...work just fine
>>> without stop errors.
>>
>>So does XP, never had a STOP/BSOD on these stations since installation.
>
> Try going to a different mainboard...with a machine that has a phantom
> hard drive installed!! lol

As I already said, moving from one chipset to another or one motherboard
to another with a different platform, will cause problems. I'm not sure
what you're trying to say here.

> There's many other examples of this stupid concept.

The concept is not new and is not limited to Windows, what's your point?


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