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Dust inside computer

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March 10, 2005 5:47:08 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Anyone know of a good effective way of ridding dust build up from heatsink
fans and components without damaging anything?

More about : dust inside computer

Anonymous
March 10, 2005 6:03:27 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

We use a 3M static-free vac.

Wonderful thingy.

Matt Gibson - GSEC

"Ryan" <Ryan@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:A8B526A6-0CB8-4709-BD3F-88537DB44247@microsoft.com...
> Anyone know of a good effective way of ridding dust build up from heatsink
> fans and components without damaging anything?
Anonymous
March 10, 2005 7:40:22 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Leythos" <void@nowhere.lan> wrote...
>>
>> Small vacuum cleaner with a small a crevice tool as you can find.
>
> Bad idea - any non-computer vacuum will cause a severe static build-up
> that could easily damage computer parts, I've seen it happen. Clean/Dry
> air is the best method (as long as you don't use 100PSI).

Simply blowing the dust out doesn't eliminate/contain it -- it will simply
settle elsewhere...


>> Though there are REALLY small "micro" vacs sold, you can use any vacuum that
>> has
>> a reasonable (not "maximum") suction.
>
> Those computer vac's are designed to eliminate static caused by the
> airflow across the plastic tools/hose.

That's fine. I've never had a problem with the portable Oreck we have.
Related resources
Anonymous
March 10, 2005 9:09:57 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Ryan wrote:
| Anyone know of a good effective way of ridding dust build up from
| heatsink fans and components without damaging anything?

Vacuum cleaner, Styrofoam cup, 5/16 plastic hose.
March 10, 2005 9:09:58 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

If one is careful, then anything can be donw with reasonable results.

If one uses an artists paint brush in one hand to 'loosen' the dust, and
then holds a vacuum nozzle nearby with the other, there'll be sufficient
vacuum to draw the dust away from the components as it is loosened.

Some parts can easily be removed from the PC, such as case fans, that will
enable more thorough cleaning of the fan and give better access to the
internal surfaces.

It is possible to buy dust filters to palce over any fan that draws air into
a PC which will help to a degree.

The best solution is to keep the PC off a floor especially if it is
carpeted, using a small stand.

"BBUNNY" wrote:

> Ryan wrote:
> | Anyone know of a good effective way of ridding dust build up from
> | heatsink fans and components without damaging anything?
>
> Vacuum cleaner, Styrofoam cup, 5/16 plastic hose.
>
>
>
March 10, 2005 10:50:49 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Take a look at Fred Langa's column

http://www.informationweek.com/story/showArticle.jhtml?...
Ted

"Ryan" <Ryan@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:A8B526A6-0CB8-4709-BD3F-88537DB44247@microsoft.com...
> Anyone know of a good effective way of ridding dust build up from heatsink
> fans and components without damaging anything?
Anonymous
March 11, 2005 1:47:26 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 14:47:08 -0800, Ryan wrote:
>
> Anyone know of a good effective way of ridding dust build up from heatsink
> fans and components without damaging anything?

You will get dust on internal items no matter how clean your computer area
is. I like the poof-can's you can purchase at most office supply and
computer stores, but if you have an air compressor with clean/dry air, set
the pressure to about 40 PSI and go at it.

Once you get it clean, a typical home, the computer should be cleaned at
least once a year. I've been in some clients offices (cement factories)
where they needed cleaned once every 2 months, about the same as one
neighbor we have :) 

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Anonymous
March 11, 2005 3:30:53 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 17:23:17 -0700, V Green wrote:
>
> Don't use a compressed air hose to do the same
> thing, pressure's too high and there can be oil in the air.

That's why I said to lower the pressure to about 40 PSI.

> And now, anticipating the inevitable bashing of this
> method from "those who know better", this has been my method
> of choice for 15+ years and 20+ systems, and I have NEVER
> had ANY problems arise from doing it, if done with care
> and common sense.

Actually, I've done it many times too and it works quite well, but I
always open all removable drives slots and blow clean air through them
too, never had a problem doing it. I forgot about the Shop-Vac method when
I brought up this method, it's less prone to getting static actually
touching the parts since it's a blow rather than a vac. Good job
mentioning this one.

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Anonymous
March 11, 2005 3:40:32 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 16:40:22 -0800, John R Weiss wrote:
>
> "Leythos" <void@nowhere.lan> wrote...
>>>
>>> Small vacuum cleaner with a small a crevice tool as you can find.
>>
>> Bad idea - any non-computer vacuum will cause a severe static build-up
>> that could easily damage computer parts, I've seen it happen. Clean/Dry
>> air is the best method (as long as you don't use 100PSI).
>
> Simply blowing the dust out doesn't eliminate/contain it -- it will simply
> settle elsewhere...

Oh, come on now - any reasonable person is not going to blow the dust out
inside a room, they will take it outside or in the garage with the door
open.

>>> Though there are REALLY small "micro" vacs sold, you can use any vacuum that
>>> has a reasonable (not "maximum") suction.
>>
>> Those computer vac's are designed to eliminate static caused by the
>> airflow across the plastic tools/hose.
>
> That's fine. I've never had a problem with the portable Oreck we have.

That's good - and the same can be said about many actions. Some people
will never experience a problem, but someone, without warnings, will do it
and trash their computer because of static. I use to manage the ESD
program for our shop when I was in the service, I've seen very interesting
damage to electronics from many devices that provided a static build-up -
and air movement in a vac is one easy way to build static.


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Anonymous
March 11, 2005 3:40:33 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

As the other posters have stated - Never use a vacuum cleaner because they
do create static charges.


"Leythos" <void@nowhere.lan> wrote in message
news:p an.2005.03.11.00.49.43.584259@nowhere.lan...
> On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 16:40:22 -0800, John R Weiss wrote:
>>
>> "Leythos" <void@nowhere.lan> wrote...
>>>>
>>>> Small vacuum cleaner with a small a crevice tool as you can find.
>>>
>>> Bad idea - any non-computer vacuum will cause a severe static build-up
>>> that could easily damage computer parts, I've seen it happen. Clean/Dry
>>> air is the best method (as long as you don't use 100PSI).
>>
>> Simply blowing the dust out doesn't eliminate/contain it -- it will
>> simply
>> settle elsewhere...
>
> Oh, come on now - any reasonable person is not going to blow the dust out
> inside a room, they will take it outside or in the garage with the door
> open.
>
>>>> Though there are REALLY small "micro" vacs sold, you can use any vacuum
>>>> that
>>>> has a reasonable (not "maximum") suction.
>>>
>>> Those computer vac's are designed to eliminate static caused by the
>>> airflow across the plastic tools/hose.
>>
>> That's fine. I've never had a problem with the portable Oreck we have.
>
> That's good - and the same can be said about many actions. Some people
> will never experience a problem, but someone, without warnings, will do it
> and trash their computer because of static. I use to manage the ESD
> program for our shop when I was in the service, I've seen very interesting
> damage to electronics from many devices that provided a static build-up -
> and air movement in a vac is one easy way to build static.
>
>
> --
> spam999free@rrohio.com
> remove 999 in order to email me
>
Anonymous
March 11, 2005 4:55:19 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 19:50:49 -0600, Ted wrote:
>
> Take a look at Fred Langa's column
>
> http://www.informationweek.com/story/showArticle.jhtml?...

I just looked through the article, the biggest flaw is that he's asking
people to remove the CPU and other parts - which is a serious risk for
home users. I don't see him wearing an ESD strap, so he's giving bad
advise to people that are going to be doing this in a typical
home/uncontrolled environment. I don't really like the idea of telling
people to use Q-Tips inside a computer after pulling parts.

It was good to see that he didn't use a vacuum and picked a poof-can, it's
good to see him using air pressure and not a vacuum tool.

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Anonymous
March 11, 2005 9:38:19 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Plug it in, power it up, dunk vigorously 3-6 times in a bucket of cold water

--
"Display tolerance & kindness to those with less
knowledge than you because there is ALWAYS
someone with more"


"Ryan" <Ryan@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:A8B526A6-0CB8-4709-BD3F-88537DB44247@microsoft.com...
> Anyone know of a good effective way of ridding dust build up from heatsink
> fans and components without damaging anything?
Anonymous
March 11, 2005 3:24:35 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

1.Take 1 pint of good whiskey.
2. 1 large glass.
3. fill glass with whiskey
4. drink till glass is empty.
5. try to remove cover on computer.
6. if you manage to get the cover removed
7. close both eyes and you will discover that there is no duxt in the
computer to worry about
If you think the dust is still there, repeat steps 3 - 7



"Ryan" <Ryan@discussions.microsoft.co
m> wrote in message
news:A8B526A6-0CB8-4709-BD3F-88537DB44247@microsoft.com...
> Anyone know of a good effective way of ridding dust build up from heatsink
> fans and components without damaging anything?
March 12, 2005 4:23:14 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Matt,

Where can one get one of these online? I tried looking but couldn't yield
any results.

Thanks.

"Matt Gibson" <mattg@blueedgetech.ca> wrote in message
news:uL4PgVcJFHA.2956@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> We use a 3M static-free vac.
>
> Wonderful thingy.
>
> Matt Gibson - GSEC
>
> "Ryan" <Ryan@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:A8B526A6-0CB8-4709-BD3F-88537DB44247@microsoft.com...
>> Anyone know of a good effective way of ridding dust build up from
>> heatsink
>> fans and components without damaging anything?
>
>
March 13, 2005 3:20:42 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

One question I have is, will the condensation from an office can sprayed on
the mobo ruin it?

"Ryan" <Ryan@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:A8B526A6-0CB8-4709-BD3F-88537DB44247@microsoft.com...
> Anyone know of a good effective way of ridding dust build up from heatsink
> fans and components without damaging anything?
March 13, 2005 9:26:02 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

http://dkc3.digikey.com/PDF/T051/1314.pdf
http://www.jensentools.com/product/category.asp?parent_...

On Sat, 12 Mar 2005 01:23:14 -0800, "Bradley"
<brad@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

>Matt,
>
>Where can one get one of these online? I tried looking but couldn't yield
>any results.
>
>Thanks.
>
>"Matt Gibson" <mattg@blueedgetech.ca> wrote in message
>news:uL4PgVcJFHA.2956@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>> We use a 3M static-free vac.
>>
>> Wonderful thingy.
>>
>> Matt Gibson - GSEC
>>
>> "Ryan" <Ryan@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>> news:A8B526A6-0CB8-4709-BD3F-88537DB44247@microsoft.com...
>>> Anyone know of a good effective way of ridding dust build up from
>>> heatsink
>>> fans and components without damaging anything?
>>
>>
>
Anonymous
March 13, 2005 4:26:54 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

On Sun, 13 Mar 2005 00:20:42 -0800, Ryan wrote:
>
> One question I have is, will the condensation from an office can sprayed on
> the mobo ruin it?

You should not be getting any LIQUID out of the can, if you are, you're
not holding it properly. The Liquid in most of those poof-can's should not
be a problem as you should have already turned the computer OFF. Let it
dry if you see condensation.

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