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Joining hard drives

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March 17, 2005 9:57:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Hi
Heres some background info:
I have i 80 gb hard drive (the one that came with my computer) and it has 2
partiotions on it the 1st the c drive has windows on it and is ntfs. (the D
drive the recovery drive) is formatted to fat 32. I now bought a 200gb Hard
drive Formmated it to Ntfs and it is the E.

The question:

Is there a way to join my C and E hard drive to think it is one large hard
drive with software or can windows do it and how?

If i want to install windows xp pro as an upgrade from xp home while C and E
hard drives are joined (if i can join them) can i do that.


Thnx
Much appreciated
-Greg

More about : joining hard drives

Anonymous
March 17, 2005 11:36:54 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

The only way to "join" two drives is to use a RAID controller that supports
JBOD.

Matt Gibson - GSEC

"GREG" <GREG@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:D 239BC39-757F-4B42-8C0E-B734DF3514A7@microsoft.com...
> Hi
> Heres some background info:
> I have i 80 gb hard drive (the one that came with my computer) and it has
> 2
> partiotions on it the 1st the c drive has windows on it and is ntfs. (the
> D
> drive the recovery drive) is formatted to fat 32. I now bought a 200gb
> Hard
> drive Formmated it to Ntfs and it is the E.
>
> The question:
>
> Is there a way to join my C and E hard drive to think it is one large hard
> drive with software or can windows do it and how?
>
> If i want to install windows xp pro as an upgrade from xp home while C and
> E
> hard drives are joined (if i can join them) can i do that.
>
>
> Thnx
> Much appreciated
> -Greg
>
>
Anonymous
March 17, 2005 11:37:26 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Carey Frisch [MVP]" <cnfrisch@nospamgmail.com> wrote in message
news:uCeGgr2KFHA.3132@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> Q. "Is there a way to join my C and E hard drive to think it is one large
> hard
> drive with software or can windows do it and how?"
>
> A. No. They are two distinct and separate drives.
>
> Q. "If i want to install windows xp pro as an upgrade from xp home while C
> and E
> hard drives are joined (if i can join them) can i do that."
>
> A. Since you cannot "join" two distinct drives, you can only upgrade
> to Windows XP Pro on the drive that currently has Windows XP Home
> Edition installed on.
>

Although you can't extend the system volume I thought using dynamic volumes
you could span other volumes across more than one drive.

Kerry
Related resources
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 2:16:47 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Vanguard" <use_ReplyTo_header> wrote in message
news:uSHlwo3KFHA.2764@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>
>
> Microsoft calls the partition with the boot sector and NTLDR program the
> system volume and the partition with the kernel and rest of the OS the
> boot volume. See http://support.microsoft.com/?id=100525. This is
> opposite of how typical users would name those partitions.
>
> Since one of the partitions is both the boot and system volume, the OP
> cannot include it in a dynamic volume. The OS has to load to then load
> the drivers to support the software supported dynamic volume (and manage
> the database for it). Also, creating dynamic volumes destroys whatever
> was there before so you would end up wiping out the OS that is trying to
> creating the dynamic volume if it were even allow to proceed.
>

Changing a basic volume to a dynamic volume does not destroy the data. It
can be done to the system volume. Go into the disk management console, right
click on Disk0 (usually C:)  and pick Convert to Dynamic disk. You cannot
install XP to a dynamic volume but once it's installed it can be converted.
I was pointing out that disks can be spanned in XP, just not from the volume
that XP was installed on. In the OP his D: partition could be converted to
dynamic and extended to span his new disk. Not the answer to his question
exactly but a possibility he might want to explore.

Kerry
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 2:19:33 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Matt Gibson" <mattg@blueedgetech.ca> wrote in message
news:euq$dQ3KFHA.4028@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> The only way to "join" two drives is to use a RAID controller that
> supports JBOD.
>

Dynamic volumes can span disks in XP.

http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/window...

Kerry
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 12:03:55 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

*grin*

Two ways. I sit corrected :) 

Matt Gibson - GSEC

"Kerry Brown" <kerry@kdbNOSPAMsystems.c*o*m> wrote in message
news:o FJzoq4KFHA.2604@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> "Matt Gibson" <mattg@blueedgetech.ca> wrote in message
> news:euq$dQ3KFHA.4028@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>> The only way to "join" two drives is to use a RAID controller that
>> supports JBOD.
>>
>
> Dynamic volumes can span disks in XP.
>
> http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/window...
>
> Kerry
>
>
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 8:21:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Vanguard" <use_ReplyTo_header> wrote in message
news:edPox2BLFHA.2796@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>
> Sorry, it is the other way around that destroys data (converting from
> dynamic to basic volumes). I've not been able to install on dynamic
> volumes but you say Windows could be installed on a basic volume and then
> converted to a dynamic volume. Good to know. I had read "A spanned
> volume is made from free disk space that is linked together from multiple
> disks (up to a maximum of 32 disks)." Well, if only free space were used
> then you'd have to wipe the boot and/or system partition(s) for Windows to
> get the free space. I guess the process would be to convert the basic
> disk and its basic volume to a dynamic disk and a simple volume and then
> adjoing that simple volume with others created from free space available
> elsewhere, like the new drive, to then create a spanned volume.
>
> I have to wonder what is on the *outside* of the dynamic volume to support
> it. The BIOS obviously doesn't support software-managed dynamic volumes
> (i.e., software RAID). All it does is find the first physical hard disk
> and load the code stored in the bootstrap area (first 460 bytes) of its
> MBR (Master Boot Record, which is sector 0). From what I've gleaned from
> various articles, defining a dynamic volume blows away the content of the
> MBR's bootstrap area. Indeed, the entire MBR gets usurped since the
> partition table isn't there anymore (and instead a 1MB database area is
> used on the disk). That would eliminate using multi-boot managers and any
> other product that usurp's the MBR bootstrap area, like GoBack.
>
> Since "Upgrading a disk to dynamic storage will render the entire disk
> unreadable to operating systems other than Windows 2000/XP", that would
> preclude using PartitionMagic or any other 3rd party partitioning software
> for managing your drives. The volumes within the dynamic volume are
> managed by Microsoft's software RAID. DriveImage, and probably other
> drive image software, doesn't support dynamic disks. Ghost 2003's support
> pages says it will support dynamic disks but only for simple volumes
> (those where its one, or more parts, are all on one physical disk) and not
> spanned, mirrored, or RAID-5 volumes - and that was before Symantec bought
> Powerquest and renamed DriveImage to Ghost. You're also screwed if you
> multiboot (where you retain a basic disk) and you used Windows XP Pro to
> create/convert basic volumes to dynamic volumes (on other disks) because
> the other operating systems don't support dynamic volumes; see KB article
> #308424.
>

You make some good points. The only time I actually use dynamic volumes is
on servers. They make it easier to make changes on the fly and then fix
things properly when the server is scheduled for maintenance. You can leave
some free unallocated space and then temporarily extend volumes if needed.
I've always been nervous about extending volumes across disks anyway. Every
time you add space from another volume you are increasing your chances of
losing the volume to hardware failure.

Kerry
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 8:42:02 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Vanguard" <use_ReplyTo_header> wrote in message
news:eGAERHCLFHA.3552@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>I just read in some help article regarding dynamic disk that, like you
>said, you cannot install Windows XP to a dynamic volume. Wouldn't that
>preclude doing a Repair of Windows XP (aka in-place install)? The help
>article said, "If a dynamic volume is created from unallocated space on a
>dynamic disk, you cannot install Windows XP Professional on that volume."
>So if setup.exe cannot recognize and install to dynamic volumes then you
>cannot do a Repair of your Windows install.
>

Never tried it, would be an interesting experiment. I'm guessing you are
right.

Kerry
!