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New hard drive maximum size.

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Anonymous
April 3, 2005 3:15:02 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I have just installed a new 200GB hard drive and Windows XP Pro keeps telling
me that it is only 127Gb in size!
When I enter Setup on booting that tells me it is a 207GB drive, why does
Windows tell me it is only 127GB and how do I get around this?
I hope someone can help me with this problem, Thanks ;) 
Anonymous
April 3, 2005 6:44:28 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Which version of XP are you using? (You need SP1 or later.)

http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;303013

"How to enable 48-bit Logical Block Addressing support for ATAPI disk drives
in Windows XP"

Address scrambled. Replace nkbob with bobkn.

"John Parry" <JohnParry@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:9DDA472B-8CEC-4251-A1DF-ED59C389BF1F@microsoft.com...
>I have just installed a new 200GB hard drive and Windows XP Pro keeps
>telling
> me that it is only 127Gb in size!
> When I enter Setup on booting that tells me it is a 207GB drive, why does
> Windows tell me it is only 127GB and how do I get around this?
> I hope someone can help me with this problem, Thanks ;) 
Anonymous
April 3, 2005 6:44:29 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Thanks Bob,
I am running SP2, with all Auto Updates as of today so Im not sure why it is
not working as it should.

"Bob Knowlden" wrote:

> Which version of XP are you using? (You need SP1 or later.)
>
> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;303013
>
> "How to enable 48-bit Logical Block Addressing support for ATAPI disk drives
> in Windows XP"
>
> Address scrambled. Replace nkbob with bobkn.
>
> "John Parry" <JohnParry@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:9DDA472B-8CEC-4251-A1DF-ED59C389BF1F@microsoft.com...
> >I have just installed a new 200GB hard drive and Windows XP Pro keeps
> >telling
> > me that it is only 127Gb in size!
> > When I enter Setup on booting that tells me it is a 207GB drive, why does
> > Windows tell me it is only 127GB and how do I get around this?
> > I hope someone can help me with this problem, Thanks ;) 
>
>
>
Related resources
April 3, 2005 9:13:33 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

>> "John Parry" <JohnParry@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>> news:9DDA472B-8CEC-4251-A1DF-ED59C389BF1F@microsoft.com...
>> >I have just installed a new 200GB hard drive and Windows XP Pro keeps
>> >telling
>> > me that it is only 127Gb in size!
>> > When I enter Setup on booting that tells me it is a 207GB drive, why
>> > does
>> > Windows tell me it is only 127GB and how do I get around this?
>> > I hope someone can help me with this problem, Thanks ;) 


> "Bob Knowlden" wrote:
>
>> Which version of XP are you using? (You need SP1 or later.)
>>
>> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;303013
>>
>> "How to enable 48-bit Logical Block Addressing support for ATAPI disk
>> drives
>> in Windows XP"


"John Parry" <JohnParry@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:8F46179B-EA56-4755-9FEF-A11360C48751@microsoft.com...
> Thanks Bob,
> I am running SP2, with all Auto Updates as of today so Im not sure why it
> is
> not working as it should.


John:
There are two basic requirements for the XP operating system to recognize
the full capacity of hard disks greater than 137 GB.

1. The motherboard's BIOS must support large-capacity disks, i.e., disks
whose capacity is greater than 137 GB; and,
2. SP1 and/or SP2 has been installed as an upgrade to the XP OS.

So it's conceivable that your motherboard's BIOS does not support
large-capacity drives. Virtually all motherboards that have been
manufactured during the last three years (approx) have this capability based
upon my experience with a fairly large number of them. Many of the older
boards that didn't originally have this capability have BIOS upgrades to
include this capability.

I'm assuming that you installed your 200 GB drive *after* SP1 and/or SP2 was
installed. If you installed that disk at the time your XP OS did
*not* contain SP1 and/or SP2, then the system would recognize *only* 137 GB
(approx.) of that disk (we'll assume in this situation the BIOS recognizes
large-capacity disks). When you subsequently install SP1 and/or SP2, the
full capacity of that disk will be recognized, *but* the remaining capacity
beyond 137 GB (approx) will be "unallocated space" which, of course, you can
partition/format using XP's Disk Management utility.

Understand that If your motherboard's BIOS does not support large-capacity
drives and no BIOS upgrade for your motherboard exists to achieve this
capability, you can gain this capability by purchasing a controller card
such as the Promise Ultra133 TX2 and installing it
in your machine. They're simple to install and they do their job well.

So, to summarize...
First determine if the problem is that your motherboard's BIOS does not
support large-capacity disks. If that's so, consult your motherboard's
manufacturer's website to see if a BIOS upgrade to provide this capability
is available.

One other thing. Make sure you've correctly jumpered your 200 GB HD in that
you haven't inadvertently imposed some disk-capacity-limitation by
incorrectly jumpering the device.
Anna
April 3, 2005 9:29:54 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"John Parry" <JohnParry@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:9DDA472B-8CEC-4251-A1DF-ED59C389BF1F@microsoft.com...
>I have just installed a new 200GB hard drive and Windows XP Pro keeps
>telling
> me that it is only 127Gb in size!
> When I enter Setup on booting that tells me it is a 207GB drive, why does
> Windows tell me it is only 127GB and how do I get around this?
> I hope someone can help me with this problem, Thanks ;) 

Download and run big drive enabler from maxtor. That should fix it. You can
get it here,
http://tinyurl.com/4fl2r
Anonymous
April 3, 2005 9:29:55 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Thanks everyone,
Found out the problem myself (isnt it usually the way...lol). It was the
BIOS I was using, been updated now,always fun updating your BIOS!
Will need to reformat the drive again to use the full size though.
Thanks,
John.
April 4, 2005 2:23:41 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

>
> "John Parry" <JohnParry@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:9DDA472B-8CEC-4251-A1DF-ED59C389BF1F@microsoft.com...
>>I have just installed a new 200GB hard drive and Windows XP Pro keeps
>>telling
>> me that it is only 127Gb in size!
>> When I enter Setup on booting that tells me it is a 207GB drive, why does
>> Windows tell me it is only 127GB and how do I get around this?
>> I hope someone can help me with this problem, Thanks ;) 



"bud" <budman@nomail.com> wrote in message
news:o 6NsDRJOFHA.2144@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Download and run big drive enabler from maxtor. That should fix it. You
> can get it here,
> http://tinyurl.com/4fl2r


First of all, John's former problem is moot, since in a later posting he
reports that he was able to update his motherboard's BIOS in order to
achieve large-capacity disk capability.

However, for others experiencing a similar problem involving the OS not
recognizing large-capacity HDs, i.e., disks > 137 GB, I would strongly
advise *against" bud's recommendation to use the so-called Big Drive Enabler
from Maxtor. This "drive overlay" program and similar ones from other
third-party sources make proprietary and non-standard modifications to the
MBR of one's HD, and nearly always seem to cause future problems. While in
the distant past these type of programs were "last resort" measures to be
used when the OS did not recognize the full capacity of the HD, they are no
longer needed with modern OSs such as XP, and indeed are mischief-makers as
any computer repair technician will tell you. My advice is to avoid them.

As I stated in a previous posting re this issue, there are two basic
requirements for XP to recognize the full capacity of a HD, i.e., disks >
137 GB:
1. The motherboard's BIOS recognizes large-capacity disks; and,
2. XP includes SP1 and/or SP2.

If the motherboard's BIOS does not recognize large-capacity disks, determine
if a BIOS upgrade is available to do so. If no BIOS upgrade is available to
achieve this capability, then purchase a controller card such as the Promise
Ultra 133 TX2. Relatively cheap and simple to install.
Anna
Anonymous
April 4, 2005 2:57:31 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Well, in this case it is not a overlay program, it just makes the needed
registry settings for LBA

"Maxtor's Big Drive Enabler is a one step executable that enables support
for drives larger than 137 Gigabytes in Windows 2000 Service Pack 3 and XP
Service Pack 1. This utility takes the guess work out of editing the Windows
registry. The Big Drive Enabler fixes an operating system limitation. This
utility is needed anytime a Hard Disk Drive larger than 137 GB is connected
to the motherboard's ATA bus, regardless of any system BIOS that supports
48-bit LBA."


--
Tumppi
Reply to group
=================================================
Most learned on nntp://news.mircosoft.com
Helsinki, Finland (remove _NOSPAM)
(translations from FI/SE not always accurate)
=================================================



"Anna" <myname@myisp.net> kirjoitti viestissä
news:%23hfDP1LOFHA.1948@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>
> >
> > "John Parry" <JohnParry@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> > news:9DDA472B-8CEC-4251-A1DF-ED59C389BF1F@microsoft.com...
> >>I have just installed a new 200GB hard drive and Windows XP Pro keeps
> >>telling
> >> me that it is only 127Gb in size!
> >> When I enter Setup on booting that tells me it is a 207GB drive, why
does
> >> Windows tell me it is only 127GB and how do I get around this?
> >> I hope someone can help me with this problem, Thanks ;) 
>
>
>
> "bud" <budman@nomail.com> wrote in message
> news:o 6NsDRJOFHA.2144@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > Download and run big drive enabler from maxtor. That should fix it. You
> > can get it here,
> > http://tinyurl.com/4fl2r
>
>
> First of all, John's former problem is moot, since in a later posting he
> reports that he was able to update his motherboard's BIOS in order to
> achieve large-capacity disk capability.
>
> However, for others experiencing a similar problem involving the OS not
> recognizing large-capacity HDs, i.e., disks > 137 GB, I would strongly
> advise *against" bud's recommendation to use the so-called Big Drive
Enabler
> from Maxtor. This "drive overlay" program and similar ones from other
> third-party sources make proprietary and non-standard modifications to the
> MBR of one's HD, and nearly always seem to cause future problems. While in
> the distant past these type of programs were "last resort" measures to be
> used when the OS did not recognize the full capacity of the HD, they are
no
> longer needed with modern OSs such as XP, and indeed are mischief-makers
as
> any computer repair technician will tell you. My advice is to avoid them.
>
> As I stated in a previous posting re this issue, there are two basic
> requirements for XP to recognize the full capacity of a HD, i.e., disks >
> 137 GB:
> 1. The motherboard's BIOS recognizes large-capacity disks; and,
> 2. XP includes SP1 and/or SP2.
>
> If the motherboard's BIOS does not recognize large-capacity disks,
determine
> if a BIOS upgrade is available to do so. If no BIOS upgrade is available
to
> achieve this capability, then purchase a controller card such as the
Promise
> Ultra 133 TX2. Relatively cheap and simple to install.
> Anna
>
>
April 4, 2005 2:57:32 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Why use a third party application to solve a basic hardware issue? Not a
recommended proceedure.

Always check BIOS compatibility. If BIOS is happy, then Windows will use
the hardware correctly. Plain and Simple.

No need to overcomplicate.



"Thomas Wendell" wrote:

> Well, in this case it is not a overlay program, it just makes the needed
> registry settings for LBA
>
> "Maxtor's Big Drive Enabler is a one step executable that enables support
> for drives larger than 137 Gigabytes in Windows 2000 Service Pack 3 and XP
> Service Pack 1. This utility takes the guess work out of editing the Windows
> registry. The Big Drive Enabler fixes an operating system limitation. This
> utility is needed anytime a Hard Disk Drive larger than 137 GB is connected
> to the motherboard's ATA bus, regardless of any system BIOS that supports
> 48-bit LBA."
>
>
> --
> Tumppi
> Reply to group
> =================================================
> Most learned on nntp://news.mircosoft.com
> Helsinki, Finland (remove _NOSPAM)
> (translations from FI/SE not always accurate)
> =================================================
>
>
>
> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> kirjoitti viestissä
> news:%23hfDP1LOFHA.1948@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> >
> > >
> > > "John Parry" <JohnParry@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> > > news:9DDA472B-8CEC-4251-A1DF-ED59C389BF1F@microsoft.com...
> > >>I have just installed a new 200GB hard drive and Windows XP Pro keeps
> > >>telling
> > >> me that it is only 127Gb in size!
> > >> When I enter Setup on booting that tells me it is a 207GB drive, why
> does
> > >> Windows tell me it is only 127GB and how do I get around this?
> > >> I hope someone can help me with this problem, Thanks ;) 
> >
> >
> >
> > "bud" <budman@nomail.com> wrote in message
> > news:o 6NsDRJOFHA.2144@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > > Download and run big drive enabler from maxtor. That should fix it. You
> > > can get it here,
> > > http://tinyurl.com/4fl2r
> >
> >
> > First of all, John's former problem is moot, since in a later posting he
> > reports that he was able to update his motherboard's BIOS in order to
> > achieve large-capacity disk capability.
> >
> > However, for others experiencing a similar problem involving the OS not
> > recognizing large-capacity HDs, i.e., disks > 137 GB, I would strongly
> > advise *against" bud's recommendation to use the so-called Big Drive
> Enabler
> > from Maxtor. This "drive overlay" program and similar ones from other
> > third-party sources make proprietary and non-standard modifications to the
> > MBR of one's HD, and nearly always seem to cause future problems. While in
> > the distant past these type of programs were "last resort" measures to be
> > used when the OS did not recognize the full capacity of the HD, they are
> no
> > longer needed with modern OSs such as XP, and indeed are mischief-makers
> as
> > any computer repair technician will tell you. My advice is to avoid them.
> >
> > As I stated in a previous posting re this issue, there are two basic
> > requirements for XP to recognize the full capacity of a HD, i.e., disks >
> > 137 GB:
> > 1. The motherboard's BIOS recognizes large-capacity disks; and,
> > 2. XP includes SP1 and/or SP2.
> >
> > If the motherboard's BIOS does not recognize large-capacity disks,
> determine
> > if a BIOS upgrade is available to do so. If no BIOS upgrade is available
> to
> > achieve this capability, then purchase a controller card such as the
> Promise
> > Ultra 133 TX2. Relatively cheap and simple to install.
> > Anna
> >
> >
>
>
>
Anonymous
April 4, 2005 2:57:33 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

To be honest I would agree with the advice of where ever possible, sticking
with a BIOS upgrade. Obviously the simpler things are kept then (usually) the
better they are, I understand a BIOS upgrade is not always possible so a
Registry altering program like the one mentioned would be preferable to
changing the Registry yourself for the vast majority of users. Of course all
these procedures do contain a certain amount of risk but having said that,
doing ANYTHING within Windows carries a certain amount of danger however
simple the task is.
April 4, 2005 6:57:30 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"John Parry" <JohnParry@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:875A7BC1-0FC6-4A1E-BBC7-A84D69AC9DFA@microsoft.com...
> To be honest I would agree with the advice of where ever possible,
> sticking
> with a BIOS upgrade. Obviously the simpler things are kept then (usually)
> the
> better they are, I understand a BIOS upgrade is not always possible so a
> Registry altering program like the one mentioned would be preferable to
> changing the Registry yourself for the vast majority of users. Of course
> all
> these procedures do contain a certain amount of risk but having said that,
> doing ANYTHING within Windows carries a certain amount of danger however
> simple the task is.


John:
My advice still stands. I strongly advise against using the Maxtor Big Drive
Enabler in an XP environment. I can virtually guarantee this program (and
similar third-party programs from the HD manufacturers) will cause you grief
down the road. And the problem will be (as many computer repair technicians
such as myself have learned) that it's difficult, if not impossible, to
diagnose that the problem has arisen because of the installation of these
types of programs and nothing short of zapping the drive will correct the
situation. It was true enough with the OSs prior to XP, and even more so
with the advent of XP. Simply stated, there is no place for these types of
programs within an XP environment.

If a BIOS upgrade is not available, purchase a controller card such as the
Promise one I previously mentioned. They're cheap enough and they do what
they're supposed to do. And frankly, if your motherboard's BIOS doesn't
support large-capacity disks, i.e., disks > 137 GB, it's really time to
purchase a "modern" motherboard, especially since you're going to be using
in your system drives that are 160 GB and larger.
Anna
Anonymous
April 4, 2005 7:33:02 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I have much the same problem as was originally started in this thread.
However, I do have a MB that supports the neccessary BIOS level so I've
passed that milestone.

My problem is that I want the 200g Maxtor drive I've just purchased to be my
boot drive and have all space to be continuous (however, maybe I should
rethink my "old" approach to having space as large as possible and consdier
some other "virtual" disk?) but the Windows XP Pro CD I have doesn't yet
support greater than 137G. That requires SP2 (maybe SP1 but a moot point)
which I odn't have until after I've completed the native XP install and can
apply the update from the web.

I don't see how to create an "updated" installation CD from XP that includes
the updated large disk drive support.

Suggestions?

"Anna" wrote:

> "John Parry" <JohnParry@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:875A7BC1-0FC6-4A1E-BBC7-A84D69AC9DFA@microsoft.com...
> > To be honest I would agree with the advice of where ever possible,
> > sticking
> > with a BIOS upgrade. Obviously the simpler things are kept then (usually)
> > the
> > better they are, I understand a BIOS upgrade is not always possible so a
> > Registry altering program like the one mentioned would be preferable to
> > changing the Registry yourself for the vast majority of users. Of course
> > all
> > these procedures do contain a certain amount of risk but having said that,
> > doing ANYTHING within Windows carries a certain amount of danger however
> > simple the task is.
>
>
> John:
> My advice still stands. I strongly advise against using the Maxtor Big Drive
> Enabler in an XP environment. I can virtually guarantee this program (and
> similar third-party programs from the HD manufacturers) will cause you grief
> down the road. And the problem will be (as many computer repair technicians
> such as myself have learned) that it's difficult, if not impossible, to
> diagnose that the problem has arisen because of the installation of these
> types of programs and nothing short of zapping the drive will correct the
> situation. It was true enough with the OSs prior to XP, and even more so
> with the advent of XP. Simply stated, there is no place for these types of
> programs within an XP environment.
>
> If a BIOS upgrade is not available, purchase a controller card such as the
> Promise one I previously mentioned. They're cheap enough and they do what
> they're supposed to do. And frankly, if your motherboard's BIOS doesn't
> support large-capacity disks, i.e., disks > 137 GB, it's really time to
> purchase a "modern" motherboard, especially since you're going to be using
> in your system drives that are 160 GB and larger.
> Anna
>
>
>
Anonymous
April 4, 2005 10:58:48 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"BAR" <BAR@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:B4EC97AB-1FA4-4B67-B5B6-16ED7C147A48@microsoft.com...
> Why use a third party application to solve a basic hardware issue? Not a
> recommended proceedure.
>
> Always check BIOS compatibility. If BIOS is happy, then Windows will use
> the hardware correctly. Plain and Simple.
>
> No need to overcomplicate.
>
>
>
> "Thomas Wendell" wrote:
>
> > Well, in this case it is not a overlay program, it just makes the needed
> > registry settings for LBA
> >
> > "Maxtor's Big Drive Enabler is a one step executable that enables
support
> > for drives larger than 137 Gigabytes in Windows 2000 Service Pack 3 and
XP
> > Service Pack 1. This utility takes the guess work out of editing the
Windows
> > registry. The Big Drive Enabler fixes an operating system limitation.
This
> > utility is needed anytime a Hard Disk Drive larger than 137 GB is
connected
> > to the motherboard's ATA bus, regardless of any system BIOS that
supports
> > 48-bit LBA."
> >
> >
> > --
> > Tumppi
> > Reply to group
> > =================================================
> > Most learned on nntp://news.mircosoft.com
> > Helsinki, Finland (remove _NOSPAM)
> > (translations from FI/SE not always accurate)
> > =================================================
> >
> >
> >
> > "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> kirjoitti viestissä
> > news:%23hfDP1LOFHA.1948@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> > >
> > > >
> > > > "John Parry" <JohnParry@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> > > > news:9DDA472B-8CEC-4251-A1DF-ED59C389BF1F@microsoft.com...
> > > >>I have just installed a new 200GB hard drive and Windows XP Pro
keeps
> > > >>telling
> > > >> me that it is only 127Gb in size!
> > > >> When I enter Setup on booting that tells me it is a 207GB drive,
why
> > does
> > > >> Windows tell me it is only 127GB and how do I get around this?
> > > >> I hope someone can help me with this problem, Thanks ;) 
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > "bud" <budman@nomail.com> wrote in message
> > > news:o 6NsDRJOFHA.2144@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > > > Download and run big drive enabler from maxtor. That should fix it.
You
> > > > can get it here,
> > > > http://tinyurl.com/4fl2r
> > >
> > >
> > > First of all, John's former problem is moot, since in a later posting
he
> > > reports that he was able to update his motherboard's BIOS in order to
> > > achieve large-capacity disk capability.
> > >
> > > However, for others experiencing a similar problem involving the OS
not
> > > recognizing large-capacity HDs, i.e., disks > 137 GB, I would strongly
> > > advise *against" bud's recommendation to use the so-called Big Drive
> > Enabler
> > > from Maxtor. This "drive overlay" program and similar ones from other
> > > third-party sources make proprietary and non-standard modifications to
the
> > > MBR of one's HD, and nearly always seem to cause future problems.
While in
> > > the distant past these type of programs were "last resort" measures to
be
> > > used when the OS did not recognize the full capacity of the HD, they
are
> > no
> > > longer needed with modern OSs such as XP, and indeed are
mischief-makers
> > as
> > > any computer repair technician will tell you. My advice is to avoid
them.
> > >
> > > As I stated in a previous posting re this issue, there are two basic
> > > requirements for XP to recognize the full capacity of a HD, i.e.,
disks >
> > > 137 GB:
> > > 1. The motherboard's BIOS recognizes large-capacity disks; and,
> > > 2. XP includes SP1 and/or SP2.
> > >
> > > If the motherboard's BIOS does not recognize large-capacity disks,
> > determine
> > > if a BIOS upgrade is available to do so. If no BIOS upgrade is
available
> > to
> > > achieve this capability, then purchase a controller card such as the
> > Promise
> > > Ultra 133 TX2. Relatively cheap and simple to install.
> > > Anna
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
> >

To all:

BAR: Sorry, not correct, one needs the registry key to enable 48bit LBA or
let Maxtor's
BigDriveEnabler fix the registry for you. Plain and Simple.
Anna: Maxtor's BigDriveEnabler is just a registry fix tool, not a drive
overlay (PowerMax is).


Summary and fixes of all 137GB+ issues (afaik) :

1. Does BIOS support 137GB+ drives? Check by Auto Detecting drive.
If just 137GB (128 GB bin.), apply suitable BIOS update if available.
If NO BIOS update available BUT Intel Chipset present, install Intel's
latest IAA-drivers.
(they support 137GB+ natively).
If NO BIOS update available and NO Intel chipset present BUT onboard
Promise/Highpoint/ITE/... controller present, hook 200GB to that
controller (booting
from this drive requires driver floppy after pressing F6 during early
Win2K/XP install).
If NO BIOS update, NO Intel Chipset, NO onboard controllers, buy a
Promise/Highpoint/ITE/...
PCI harddisk controller card (usually support 137GB+ but check first).
2. WinXP + SP1 (or better) is required to get 200GB fully accessible.
3. When intending to boot from this drive keep 1st partition smaller than
137GB.
4. Run Maxtor's BigDriveEnabler.
5. To avoid:
- Data corruption after entering Standby or Hybernation mode
- Data corruption after memory dump due to serious Windows Failure
- Reboot instead of resuming from hybernation mode.
read MS KB article 331958 and follow instructions.

Note: not sure wether SP2 takes care of steps 3-4-5 but they can't hurt.

This should be all.
John7
April 4, 2005 11:16:56 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

>> "John Parry" <JohnParry@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>> news:875A7BC1-0FC6-4A1E-BBC7-A84D69AC9DFA@microsoft.com...
>> > To be honest I would agree with the advice of where ever possible,
>> > sticking
>> > with a BIOS upgrade. Obviously the simpler things are kept then
>> > (usually)
>> > the
>> > better they are, I understand a BIOS upgrade is not always possible so
>> > a
>> > Registry altering program like the one mentioned would be preferable to
>> > changing the Registry yourself for the vast majority of users. Of
>> > course
>> > all
>> > these procedures do contain a certain amount of risk but having said
>> > that,
>> > doing ANYTHING within Windows carries a certain amount of danger
>> > however
>> > simple the task is.


> "Anna" wrote:
>> John:
>> My advice still stands. I strongly advise against using the Maxtor Big
>> Drive
>> Enabler in an XP environment. I can virtually guarantee this program (and
>> similar third-party programs from the HD manufacturers) will cause you
>> grief
>> down the road. And the problem will be (as many computer repair
>> technicians
>> such as myself have learned) that it's difficult, if not impossible, to
>> diagnose that the problem has arisen because of the installation of these
>> types of programs and nothing short of zapping the drive will correct the
>> situation. It was true enough with the OSs prior to XP, and even more so
>> with the advent of XP. Simply stated, there is no place for these types
>> of
>> programs within an XP environment.
>>
>> If a BIOS upgrade is not available, purchase a controller card such as
>> the
>> Promise one I previously mentioned. They're cheap enough and they do what
>> they're supposed to do. And frankly, if your motherboard's BIOS doesn't
>> support large-capacity disks, i.e., disks > 137 GB, it's really time to
>> purchase a "modern" motherboard, especially since you're going to be
>> using
>> in your system drives that are 160 GB and larger.
>> Anna


"Gary Gratton" <GaryGratton@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:D 56641DD-78F6-4C2E-9A8C-EF2E3A9A5D9B@microsoft.com...
>I have much the same problem as was originally started in this thread.
> However, I do have a MB that supports the neccessary BIOS level so I've
> passed that milestone.
>
> My problem is that I want the 200g Maxtor drive I've just purchased to be
> my
> boot drive and have all space to be continuous (however, maybe I should
> rethink my "old" approach to having space as large as possible and
> consdier
> some other "virtual" disk?) but the Windows XP Pro CD I have doesn't yet
> support greater than 137G. That requires SP2 (maybe SP1 but a moot point)
> which I odn't have until after I've completed the native XP install and
> can
> apply the update from the web.
>
> I don't see how to create an "updated" installation CD from XP that
> includes
> the updated large disk drive support.
>
> Suggestions?


Gary:
When you install SP1 or SP2 the full capacity of your 200 GB HD will be
recognized; *however*, the remaining disk space beyond the 137 GB (approx.)
will be reflected as "unallocated space". (I'm assuming that you've
previously partitioned/formatted the drive before installing SP1 and/or
SP2). You will, of course, be able to partition/format that unallocated
space using XP's Disk Management utility; however, this means you will have
two partitions at a minimum. Many users prefer to multi-partition their
large drives anyway, so this might not be a problem for you.

However, if you are bent on having a single partition for your 200 GB disk
(the system will actually reflect about 186 GB), the only ways you could do
this is 1. repartition/reformat the disk after installing SP1 and/or SP2, or
2. employ a third-party program such as Partition Magic that would merge the
partitions into a single partition.
Anna
April 5, 2005 8:54:48 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

On Mon, 4 Apr 2005 15:33:02 -0700, Gary Gratton
<GaryGratton@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

>I have much the same problem as was originally started in this thread.
>However, I do have a MB that supports the neccessary BIOS level so I've
>passed that milestone.
>
>My problem is that I want the 200g Maxtor drive I've just purchased to be my
>boot drive and have all space to be continuous (however, maybe I should
>rethink my "old" approach to having space as large as possible and consdier
>some other "virtual" disk?) but the Windows XP Pro CD I have doesn't yet
>support greater than 137G. That requires SP2 (maybe SP1 but a moot point)
>which I odn't have until after I've completed the native XP install and can
>apply the update from the web.
>
>I don't see how to create an "updated" installation CD from XP that includes
>the updated large disk drive support.
>
>Suggestions?

Yes. Google 'slipstream windows'.

>"Anna" wrote:
>
>> "John Parry" <JohnParry@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>> news:875A7BC1-0FC6-4A1E-BBC7-A84D69AC9DFA@microsoft.com...
>> > To be honest I would agree with the advice of where ever possible,
>> > sticking
>> > with a BIOS upgrade. Obviously the simpler things are kept then (usually)
>> > the
>> > better they are, I understand a BIOS upgrade is not always possible so a
>> > Registry altering program like the one mentioned would be preferable to
>> > changing the Registry yourself for the vast majority of users. Of course
>> > all
>> > these procedures do contain a certain amount of risk but having said that,
>> > doing ANYTHING within Windows carries a certain amount of danger however
>> > simple the task is.
>>
>>
>> John:
>> My advice still stands. I strongly advise against using the Maxtor Big Drive
>> Enabler in an XP environment. I can virtually guarantee this program (and
>> similar third-party programs from the HD manufacturers) will cause you grief
>> down the road. And the problem will be (as many computer repair technicians
>> such as myself have learned) that it's difficult, if not impossible, to
>> diagnose that the problem has arisen because of the installation of these
>> types of programs and nothing short of zapping the drive will correct the
>> situation. It was true enough with the OSs prior to XP, and even more so
>> with the advent of XP. Simply stated, there is no place for these types of
>> programs within an XP environment.
>>
>> If a BIOS upgrade is not available, purchase a controller card such as the
>> Promise one I previously mentioned. They're cheap enough and they do what
>> they're supposed to do. And frankly, if your motherboard's BIOS doesn't
>> support large-capacity disks, i.e., disks > 137 GB, it's really time to
>> purchase a "modern" motherboard, especially since you're going to be using
>> in your system drives that are 160 GB and larger.
>> Anna
>>
>>
>>
Anonymous
April 6, 2005 11:47:18 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Gary Gratton" <GaryGratton@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:D 56641DD-78F6-4C2E-9A8C-EF2E3A9A5D9B@microsoft.com...
>I have much the same problem as was originally started in this thread.
> However, I do have a MB that supports the neccessary BIOS level so I've
> passed that milestone.
>
> My problem is that I want the 200g Maxtor drive I've just purchased to be
> my
> boot drive and have all space to be continuous (however, maybe I should
> rethink my "old" approach to having space as large as possible and
> consdier
> some other "virtual" disk?) but the Windows XP Pro CD I have doesn't yet
> support greater than 137G. That requires SP2 (maybe SP1 but a moot point)
> which I odn't have until after I've completed the native XP install and
> can
> apply the update from the web.
>
> I don't see how to create an "updated" installation CD from XP that
> includes
> the updated large disk drive support.
>
> Suggestions?
>

Here is info on to SlipStream SP 2 into XP and create a new CD. It works
great.

http://www.theeldergeek.com/slipstreamed_xpsp2_cd.htm
!