PC Dust buildup

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I have your basic ATX form setup with one side fan, 1 rear. I don't have any
additional fans beyond this.

I've noticed my side fan is a culprit for quick dust buildup.

Anyone have any suggestions for cutting the dust buildup?
43 answers Last reply
More about dust buildup
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Newbie

    Dust is not generated by the computer.. it is collected by the computer..
    locate the source of the dust.. tops of doors and picture frames are a good
    start..

    --
    Mike Hall
    MVP - Windows Shell/user

    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm


    "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:%23Be7jkjPFHA.2252@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >I have your basic ATX form setup with one side fan, 1 rear. I don't have
    >any additional fans beyond this.
    >
    > I've noticed my side fan is a culprit for quick dust buildup.
    >
    > Anyone have any suggestions for cutting the dust buildup?
    >
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    So there's no special fans or tools I can install in my computer to cut some
    of the buildup?

    "Mike Hall (MS-MVP)" <mike.hall.mail@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
    news:eM4KpsjPFHA.3408@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    > Newbie
    >
    > Dust is not generated by the computer.. it is collected by the computer..
    > locate the source of the dust.. tops of doors and picture frames are a
    > good start..
    >
    > --
    > Mike Hall
    > MVP - Windows Shell/user
    >
    > http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:%23Be7jkjPFHA.2252@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >>I have your basic ATX form setup with one side fan, 1 rear. I don't have
    >>any additional fans beyond this.
    >>
    >> I've noticed my side fan is a culprit for quick dust buildup.
    >>
    >> Anyone have any suggestions for cutting the dust buildup?
    >>
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    In article <usVnpxjPFHA.1088@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl>,
    Newbie <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
    >So there's no special fans or tools I can install in my computer to cut some
    >of the buildup?
    >
    >"Mike Hall (MS-MVP)" <mike.hall.mail@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
    >news:eM4KpsjPFHA.3408@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    >> Newbie
    >>
    >> Dust is not generated by the computer.. it is collected by the computer..
    >> locate the source of the dust.. tops of doors and picture frames are a
    >> good start..
    >>
    >> --
    >> Mike Hall
    >> MVP - Windows Shell/user
    >>
    >> http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> news:%23Be7jkjPFHA.2252@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >>>I have your basic ATX form setup with one side fan, 1 rear. I don't have
    >>>any additional fans beyond this.
    >>>
    >>> I've noticed my side fan is a culprit for quick dust buildup.
    >>>
    >>> Anyone have any suggestions for cutting the dust buildup?


    I buy a fiberglass air conditioner filter and cut squares out of it
    that match the INTAKE openings and use grey tape to stick it
    place. Cover the biggest of the holes on the from panel with the same
    tape. (this mess is hidden by the pop-off plastic panel. Remember to
    change the filters once in a while.

    Every time you open up the system use a can of compressed air to blow
    the dust out of all the fans, including the PSU. Don't use a vacuum
    cleaner.

    --
    a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m

    Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Newbie

    Assuming that your fans blow 'out', filters over the fans will be of little
    value.. dust will enter the vents behind the front panel and through the
    small gaps between optical and diskette drives and the case.. dust being
    pulled through optical drives and diskette drives is one of the reasons that
    these units fail prematurely.. your best bet is to keep the atmosphere in
    the room as dust free as possible..

    --
    Mike Hall
    MVP - Windows Shell/user

    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm


    "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:usVnpxjPFHA.1088@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    > So there's no special fans or tools I can install in my computer to cut
    > some of the buildup?
    >
    > "Mike Hall (MS-MVP)" <mike.hall.mail@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
    > news:eM4KpsjPFHA.3408@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    >> Newbie
    >>
    >> Dust is not generated by the computer.. it is collected by the computer..
    >> locate the source of the dust.. tops of doors and picture frames are a
    >> good start..
    >>
    >> --
    >> Mike Hall
    >> MVP - Windows Shell/user
    >>
    >> http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> news:%23Be7jkjPFHA.2252@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >>>I have your basic ATX form setup with one side fan, 1 rear. I don't have
    >>>any additional fans beyond this.
    >>>
    >>> I've noticed my side fan is a culprit for quick dust buildup.
    >>>
    >>> Anyone have any suggestions for cutting the dust buildup?
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    About every 6 months or so, I use the following to blow out my cases:
    http://www.cyberguys.com/templates/searchdetail.asp?T1=114+0570&dept=&search=&child=

    You don't need to use the concentrator, it's fairly powerful and will blow
    out fans and cases without leaving any residue.

    --
    In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.

    Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    Windows Shell/User
    https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx
    Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/


    "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:%23Be7jkjPFHA.2252@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >I have your basic ATX form setup with one side fan, 1 rear. I don't have
    >any additional fans beyond this.
    >
    > I've noticed my side fan is a culprit for quick dust buildup.
    >
    > Anyone have any suggestions for cutting the dust buildup?
    >
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    This is great. I take it use blow out the dust that resides on CPU coolers
    and mobo's and other hard to get places, right?

    "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP)" <user@#notme.com> wrote in message
    news:OSn1%23rtPFHA.2724@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > About every 6 months or so, I use the following to blow out my cases:
    > http://www.cyberguys.com/templates/searchdetail.asp?T1=114+0570&dept=&search=&child=
    >
    > You don't need to use the concentrator, it's fairly powerful and will blow
    > out fans and cases without leaving any residue.
    >
    > --
    > In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.
    >
    > Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    > Windows Shell/User
    > https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx
    > Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    > DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >
    >
    > "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:%23Be7jkjPFHA.2252@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >>I have your basic ATX form setup with one side fan, 1 rear. I don't have
    >>any additional fans beyond this.
    >>
    >> I've noticed my side fan is a culprit for quick dust buildup.
    >>
    >> Anyone have any suggestions for cutting the dust buildup?
    >>
    >
    >
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    The blower is pretty strong so I don't really have to move it too far into
    the case and trust me, it will get to all the nooks and crannies!:-)

    --
    In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.

    Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    Windows Shell/User
    https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx
    Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/


    "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:eA79DHvPFHA.4012@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > This is great. I take it use blow out the dust that resides on CPU coolers
    > and mobo's and other hard to get places, right?
    >
    > "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP)" <user@#notme.com> wrote in message
    > news:OSn1%23rtPFHA.2724@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    >> About every 6 months or so, I use the following to blow out my cases:
    >> http://www.cyberguys.com/templates/searchdetail.asp?T1=114+0570&dept=&search=&child=
    >>
    >> You don't need to use the concentrator, it's fairly powerful and will
    >> blow out fans and cases without leaving any residue.
    >>
    >> --
    >> In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.
    >>
    >> Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    >> Windows Shell/User
    >> https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx
    >> Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    >> DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >>
    >>
    >> "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> news:%23Be7jkjPFHA.2252@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >>>I have your basic ATX form setup with one side fan, 1 rear. I don't have
    >>>any additional fans beyond this.
    >>>
    >>> I've noticed my side fan is a culprit for quick dust buildup.
    >>>
    >>> Anyone have any suggestions for cutting the dust buildup?
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    In article <uMOy3TvPFHA.2136@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl>,
    Michael Solomon \(MS-MVP\) <user@#notme.com> wrote:
    >The blower is pretty strong so I don't really have to move it too far into
    >the case and trust me, it will get to all the nooks and crannies!:-)
    >
    >--
    >In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.
    >
    >Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    >Windows Shell/User
    >https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx
    >Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    >DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >
    >
    >"Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >news:eA79DHvPFHA.4012@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    >> This is great. I take it use blow out the dust that resides on CPU coolers
    >> and mobo's and other hard to get places, right?
    >>
    >> "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP)" <user@#notme.com> wrote in message
    >> news:OSn1%23rtPFHA.2724@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    >>> About every 6 months or so, I use the following to blow out my cases:
    >>> http://www.cyberguys.com/templates/searchdetail.asp?T1=114+0570&dept=&search=&child=
    >>>
    >>> You don't need to use the concentrator, it's fairly powerful and will
    >>> blow out fans and cases without leaving any residue.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.
    >>>
    >>> Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    >>> Windows Shell/User
    >>> https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx
    >>> Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    >>> DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >>> news:%23Be7jkjPFHA.2252@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >>>>I have your basic ATX form setup with one side fan, 1 rear. I don't have
    >>>>any additional fans beyond this.
    >>>>
    >>>> I've noticed my side fan is a culprit for quick dust buildup.
    >>>>
    >>>> Anyone have any suggestions for cutting the dust buildup?
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >


    Using a VAC on electronics can cause static
    discharge and damageq. Canned air is the right thing to use.


    --
    a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m

    Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    This is a blower and this blower has no exposed metal parts including the
    nozzles, no brush nozzle attachment either. Canned air can leave a residue
    which over time can build up.

    If users take proper precautions, ground themselves by touching something
    metal before they open the case and wear a static discharge band as well,
    they should not have a problem. The danger should be no greater than the
    simple process of opening the case to use canned air or to install a
    soundcard, graphics card or anything else that requires the user to open the
    case.

    --
    In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.

    Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    Windows Shell/User
    https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx
    Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/


    "Al Dykes" <adykes@panix.com> wrote in message
    news:d3f4gm$c2q$1@panix5.panix.com...
    > In article <uMOy3TvPFHA.2136@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl>,
    > Michael Solomon \(MS-MVP\) <user@#notme.com> wrote:
    >>The blower is pretty strong so I don't really have to move it too far into
    >>the case and trust me, it will get to all the nooks and crannies!:-)
    >>
    >>--
    >>In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.
    >>
    >>Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    >>Windows Shell/User
    >>https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx
    >>Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    >>DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >>
    >>
    >>"Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >>news:eA79DHvPFHA.4012@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    >>> This is great. I take it use blow out the dust that resides on CPU
    >>> coolers
    >>> and mobo's and other hard to get places, right?
    >>>
    >>> "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP)" <user@#notme.com> wrote in message
    >>> news:OSn1%23rtPFHA.2724@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    >>>> About every 6 months or so, I use the following to blow out my cases:
    >>>> http://www.cyberguys.com/templates/searchdetail.asp?T1=114+0570&dept=&search=&child=
    >>>>
    >>>> You don't need to use the concentrator, it's fairly powerful and will
    >>>> blow out fans and cases without leaving any residue.
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.
    >>>>
    >>>> Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    >>>> Windows Shell/User
    >>>> https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx
    >>>> Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    >>>> DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >>>> news:%23Be7jkjPFHA.2252@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >>>>>I have your basic ATX form setup with one side fan, 1 rear. I don't
    >>>>>have
    >>>>>any additional fans beyond this.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I've noticed my side fan is a culprit for quick dust buildup.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Anyone have any suggestions for cutting the dust buildup?
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    > Using a VAC on electronics can cause static
    > discharge and damageq. Canned air is the right thing to use.
    >
    >
    > --
    > a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
    >
    > Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    On Tue, 12 Apr 2005 00:07:04 -0700, Michael Solomon (MS-MVP) wrote:
    >
    > This is a blower and this blower has no exposed metal parts including
    > the nozzles, no brush nozzle attachment either. Canned air can leave a
    > residue which over time can build up.

    Any vac, used in any mode (blower/vac), which has a ungrounded hose to
    provide the air, can and almost always does, generate static of some
    level. The simple physics are that a wand like they provide in those cheap
    units is going to give a much higher chance of a bad experience.

    I used compressed, dry, air, from a compressor set to 50PSI, when I clean
    cases. In a pinch I will use a normal compressor if the air appears to be
    clean and water free.

    If you are grounded, and holding a nozzle (even a vac hose) at the end, it
    would discharge any static, but most people unplug their computer, move
    it, open it, and clean it.

    > If users take proper precautions, ground themselves by touching
    > something metal before they open the case and wear a static discharge
    > band as well, they should not have a problem. The danger should be no
    > greater than the simple process of opening the case to use canned air or
    > to install a soundcard, graphics card or anything else that requires the
    > user to open the case.

    While I own two static bands, I've never seen anyone else that owns even
    one, not in 40 years. The only people I know that own them are people that
    have been through ESD training, and not many residential users have :-)

    --
    spam999free@rrohio.com
    remove 999 in order to email me
  11. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    In article <ijP6e.1747$Rd.1398@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com>,
    Leythos <void@nowhere.lan> wrote:
    >On Tue, 12 Apr 2005 00:07:04 -0700, Michael Solomon (MS-MVP) wrote:
    >>
    >> This is a blower and this blower has no exposed metal parts including
    >> the nozzles, no brush nozzle attachment either. Canned air can leave a
    >> residue which over time can build up.
    >
    >Any vac, used in any mode (blower/vac), which has a ungrounded hose to
    >provide the air, can and almost always does, generate static of some
    >level. The simple physics are that a wand like they provide in those cheap
    >units is going to give a much higher chance of a bad experience.
    >
    >I used compressed, dry, air, from a compressor set to 50PSI, when I clean
    >cases. In a pinch I will use a normal compressor if the air appears to be
    >clean and water free.
    >
    >If you are grounded, and holding a nozzle (even a vac hose) at the end, it
    >would discharge any static, but most people unplug their computer, move
    >it, open it, and clean it.
    >
    >> If users take proper precautions, ground themselves by touching
    >> something metal before they open the case and wear a static discharge
    >> band as well, they should not have a problem. The danger should be no
    >> greater than the simple process of opening the case to use canned air or
    >> to install a soundcard, graphics card or anything else that requires the
    >> user to open the case.
    >
    >While I own two static bands, I've never seen anyone else that owns even
    >one, not in 40 years. The only people I know that own them are people that
    >have been through ESD training, and not many residential users have :-)
    >

    Good advice, above.

    I own a static strap and use it if:

    I'm working inside on a server with parts cost a week's wage, or
    spares are not on hand and I'll be fired if I can't get the system I'm
    working on back online by deadline when the dawn comes up.

    If the customer is watching me and I don't want any coulda or
    hindsight if the server dies a day later. The strap is just for show.

    If the part I'm handling costs more than I feel like paying for out of
    pocket.

    Remeber; Static discharge below the level of perceptability can damage
    a component, and the effect can be delayed.


    --
    a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m

    Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.
  12. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    I agree fully. I should have made that point about properly grounding
    yourself in my original post.

    --
    In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.

    Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    Windows Shell/User
    https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx
    Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/


    "Leythos" <void@nowhere.lan> wrote in message
    news:ijP6e.1747$Rd.1398@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com...
    > On Tue, 12 Apr 2005 00:07:04 -0700, Michael Solomon (MS-MVP) wrote:
    >>
    >> This is a blower and this blower has no exposed metal parts including
    >> the nozzles, no brush nozzle attachment either. Canned air can leave a
    >> residue which over time can build up.
    >
    > Any vac, used in any mode (blower/vac), which has a ungrounded hose to
    > provide the air, can and almost always does, generate static of some
    > level. The simple physics are that a wand like they provide in those cheap
    > units is going to give a much higher chance of a bad experience.
    >
    > I used compressed, dry, air, from a compressor set to 50PSI, when I clean
    > cases. In a pinch I will use a normal compressor if the air appears to be
    > clean and water free.
    >
    > If you are grounded, and holding a nozzle (even a vac hose) at the end, it
    > would discharge any static, but most people unplug their computer, move
    > it, open it, and clean it.
    >
    >> If users take proper precautions, ground themselves by touching
    >> something metal before they open the case and wear a static discharge
    >> band as well, they should not have a problem. The danger should be no
    >> greater than the simple process of opening the case to use canned air or
    >> to install a soundcard, graphics card or anything else that requires the
    >> user to open the case.
    >
    > While I own two static bands, I've never seen anyone else that owns even
    > one, not in 40 years. The only people I know that own them are people that
    > have been through ESD training, and not many residential users have :-)
    >
    > --
    > spam999free@rrohio.com
    > remove 999 in order to email me
    >
  13. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    We have serious dust problems in our area. There's never a time when I can
    go beyond 2 or 3 weeks max. without cleaning all the computers in the house.
    I built the computers we use and 1 has 5 cooling fans, 1 has 6 cooling fans
    and mine has 8. So there is a huge amount of air movement in these
    computers. Hence, dust buildup is very frequent. In my opinion dust is rated
    as one of the top enemies of technology. It is a great friend to heat and
    the heat is a great enemey to computers.

    I've tried every method I can imagine to find the best solution to clean
    them out. Canned air....try using around 6 cans for 3 computers every 2 or 3
    weeks....way expensive. So I bought a 2 or 3 gallon air tank at WalMart for
    around $17. It takes a quarter to fill it and with some serious brushing
    with a good auto parts brush, the tank will do 2 computers. There has never
    been an issue with moisture using this method.

    But.....I've finally found the best solution I believe possible for cleaning
    the dust and dirt out. I remove both side panels, take it outside on the
    workbench or picnic table and blow it out with my leaf blower. Go ahead and
    laugh, everyone that I've told gets a good laugh about it.....but believe me
    it works beautifully.

    Always check to make sure you don't have any loose components or such before
    you start. I have my wife hold the cooling fan blades with the handle of my
    cleaning brush to prevent them from spinning.....I'm afraid they may spin so
    fast it could create possible damage. After cleaning the area around the fan
    blade she is holding, she moves her brush handle on to the next cooling fan,
    etc.

    You have zero moisture to worry about. You have zero brushing to do and
    every spec of dust and dirt is removed. Even from those areas like inside
    the cd trays, etc. that you had a hard time getting to before.

    YES.....let me be perfectly clear, YOU MUST USE CAUTION! Make no mistake
    about it, if you're not careful you can do some very serious damage. It's
    much like going to the car wash and using a very high pressure sprayer, any
    knucklehead knows you don't put the tip of the wand right up to the car
    surface....doh...you'll be removing paint, not the dirt and mud. Just
    remember you have total control over the leaf blower and you don't have to
    stick it right against the graphics card or power supply to remove the
    debris. And you don't have to rev it up like you're getting ready to race,
    just take your time and get the feel of it and you'll quickly realize how
    and where to use that trigger finger. Oh, with this method it takes longer
    to remove and replace the sides than the actual cleaning job.

    Take care and good luck, Rob.
  14. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    On Tue, 12 Apr 2005 12:51:21 -0500, Rob wrote:
    >
    > We have serious dust problems in our area. There's never a time when I can
    > go beyond 2 or 3 weeks max. without cleaning all the computers in the house.
    > I built the computers we use and 1 has 5 cooling fans, 1 has 6 cooling fans
    > and mine has 8. So there is a huge amount of air movement in these
    > computers. Hence, dust buildup is very frequent. In my opinion dust is rated
    > as one of the top enemies of technology. It is a great friend to heat and
    > the heat is a great enemey to computers.

    Unless you live in a desert area, you've got some serious problems. If the
    dust is that bad, it's also a medical threat. Heck, you would have to
    change the filters on the House AC unit every couple weeks too.

    > I've tried every method I can imagine to find the best solution to clean
    > them out. Canned air....try using around 6 cans for 3 computers every 2 or 3
    > weeks....way expensive. So I bought a 2 or 3 gallon air tank at WalMart for
    > around $17. It takes a quarter to fill it and with some serious brushing
    > with a good auto parts brush, the tank will do 2 computers. There has never
    > been an issue with moisture using this method.

    I call those POOF cans since they make your money go POOF in no time at
    all. A cheap air compressor, from walmart or home-depot, will more that do
    the job properly, and you can use it to blow up balloons for parties :)

    > But.....I've finally found the best solution I believe possible for cleaning
    > the dust and dirt out. I remove both side panels, take it outside on the
    > workbench or picnic table and blow it out with my leaf blower. Go ahead and
    > laugh, everyone that I've told gets a good laugh about it.....but believe me
    > it works beautifully.

    Now that's the funniest thing I've seen today.

    One bit of advice - never use a BRUSH to clean computer parts.

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  15. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Ahhhhhh......wow, you are so right. I never even thought about all the
    potential static electricity all the brushing creates.

    Great point and thank you very much for that post. That's the great part
    about these forums, you can learn something new no matter what level of
    experience you have.

    Take care, Rob.
  16. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Piece of air conditioner foam filter taped over the fan hole! Works great.

    --
    Regards,

    Richard Urban

    aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)

    If you knew as much as you thought you know,
    You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!


    "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:%23Be7jkjPFHA.2252@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >I have your basic ATX form setup with one side fan, 1 rear. I don't have
    >any additional fans beyond this.
    >
    > I've noticed my side fan is a culprit for quick dust buildup.
    >
    > Anyone have any suggestions for cutting the dust buildup?
    >
  17. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Leythos wrote:

    > While I own two static bands, I've never seen anyone else that owns even
    > one, not in 40 years. The only people I know that own them are people that
    > have been through ESD training, and not many residential users have :-)

    We can still try - I sell PC components on ebay, and all ship with a
    disposable strap and a note saying the DOA warranty is void if the buyer
    fails to use it.
  18. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Rob wrote:

    > But.....I've finally found the best solution I believe possible for cleaning
    > the dust and dirt out. I remove both side panels, take it outside on the
    > workbench or picnic table and blow it out with my leaf blower. Go ahead and
    > laugh, everyone that I've told gets a good laugh about it.....but believe me
    > it works beautifully.

    I take them outside and use the shop-vac on blow - same idea, works
    great, but I wear an anti-static strap and hold the end of the nozzle
    just in case.

    > Always check to make sure you don't have any loose components or such before
    > you start. I have my wife hold the cooling fan blades with the handle of my
    > cleaning brush to prevent them from spinning.....I'm afraid they may spin so
    > fast it could create possible damage. After cleaning the area around the fan
    > blade she is holding, she moves her brush handle on to the next cooling fan,
    > etc.

    I deliberately spin the fans as fast as possible as it gets the crud off
    the underside of the blades without using a brush. I've been doing it
    for years, never had a problem with fan damage.
  19. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Well, based on everything that was said, I can see there is much a
    difference of opinions on this issue.

    I do feel that I will try Mr. Michael Solomon's idea of blowing out the case
    from the product at Cyberguys.

    "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:%23Be7jkjPFHA.2252@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >I have your basic ATX form setup with one side fan, 1 rear. I don't have
    >any additional fans beyond this.
    >
    > I've noticed my side fan is a culprit for quick dust buildup.
    >
    > Anyone have any suggestions for cutting the dust buildup?
    >
  20. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 20:51:53 -0700, Newbie wrote:
    >
    > Well, based on everything that was said, I can see there is much a
    > difference of opinions on this issue.

    the only difference of opinion is really if static is a threat or not and
    how it's introduced during cleaning. In all cases, using a plastic hose
    will generate static unless the hose is part of a grounded system with a
    conductive plastic designed to discharge static.

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  21. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Newbie, be sure to make note of and pay heed to the issue of static
    electricity as mentioned in this thread. Cyberguys also sells antistatic
    wrist straps and they are relatively inexpensive. They sell both cord and
    cordless. The corded type uses a ground wire that must be attached to
    something metal, the cordless type must be put on about 15 minutes prior to
    doing any work in order for it to properly discharge static electricity:
    http://www.cyberguys.com/templates/SearchAll.asp?s=SA

    --
    In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.

    Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    Windows Shell/User
    https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx
    Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/


    "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:OhdDLVKQFHA.3496@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    > Well, based on everything that was said, I can see there is much a
    > difference of opinions on this issue.
    >
    > I do feel that I will try Mr. Michael Solomon's idea of blowing out the
    > case from the product at Cyberguys.
    >
    > "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:%23Be7jkjPFHA.2252@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >>I have your basic ATX form setup with one side fan, 1 rear. I don't have
    >>any additional fans beyond this.
    >>
    >> I've noticed my side fan is a culprit for quick dust buildup.
    >>
    >> Anyone have any suggestions for cutting the dust buildup?
    >>
    >
    >
  22. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2005 12:33:23 -0700, Michael Solomon (MS-MVP) wrote:
    >
    > the cordless type must be put on about 15 minutes prior to doing any
    > work in order for it to properly discharge static electricity:

    I read the description of it on their site, the only place I would use
    something like that is sitting at a bench, not leaving the bench, and in a
    room that is designed to be static free - in other words, I would not
    trust it to protect anyone in a home/soho setting.


    --
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  23. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Good point. Unfortunately, there's not always something around to which you
    can attach the ground wire but I agree, the corded type is better.

    --
    In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.

    Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    Windows Shell/User
    https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx
    Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/


    "Leythos" <void@nowhere.lan> wrote in message
    news:HwB7e.888$Qu2.545@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com...
    > On Thu, 14 Apr 2005 12:33:23 -0700, Michael Solomon (MS-MVP) wrote:
    >>
    >> the cordless type must be put on about 15 minutes prior to doing any
    >> work in order for it to properly discharge static electricity:
    >
    > I read the description of it on their site, the only place I would use
    > something like that is sitting at a bench, not leaving the bench, and in a
    > room that is designed to be static free - in other words, I would not
    > trust it to protect anyone in a home/soho setting.
    >
    >
    > --
    > spam999free@rrohio.com
    > remove 999 in order to email me
    >
  24. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Michael,

    So, would this be a good corded antistatic strap?

    http://www.cyberguys.com/templates/searchdetail.asp?T1=116+0120&dept=&search=&child=

    "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP)" <user@#notme.com> wrote in message
    news:%23mQPTjSQFHA.2136@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    > Newbie, be sure to make note of and pay heed to the issue of static
    > electricity as mentioned in this thread. Cyberguys also sells antistatic
    > wrist straps and they are relatively inexpensive. They sell both cord and
    > cordless. The corded type uses a ground wire that must be attached to
    > something metal, the cordless type must be put on about 15 minutes prior
    > to doing any work in order for it to properly discharge static
    > electricity:
    > http://www.cyberguys.com/templates/SearchAll.asp?s=SA
    >
    > --
    > In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.
    >
    > Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    > Windows Shell/User
    > https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx
    > Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    > DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >
    >
    > "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:OhdDLVKQFHA.3496@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    >> Well, based on everything that was said, I can see there is much a
    >> difference of opinions on this issue.
    >>
    >> I do feel that I will try Mr. Michael Solomon's idea of blowing out the
    >> case from the product at Cyberguys.
    >>
    >> "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> news:%23Be7jkjPFHA.2252@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >>>I have your basic ATX form setup with one side fan, 1 rear. I don't have
    >>>any additional fans beyond this.
    >>>
    >>> I've noticed my side fan is a culprit for quick dust buildup.
    >>>
    >>> Anyone have any suggestions for cutting the dust buildup?
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  25. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2005 16:10:30 -0700, Michael Solomon (MS-MVP) wrote:
    >
    > Good point. Unfortunately, there's not always something around to which
    > you can attach the ground wire but I agree, the corded type is better.

    If you leave the computer plugged into the wall outlet, with a proper
    grounded plug/outlet, the case/PSU should be grounded - touching it will
    discharge the static.

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  26. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    On Thu, 14 Apr 2005 23:43:45 -0700, Newbie wrote:
    >
    > Michael,
    >
    > So, would this be a good corded antistatic strap?
    >
    > http://www.cyberguys.com/templates/searchdetail.asp?T1=116+0120&dept=&search=&child=

    There is no mention of the resistance used - if this unit doesn't have a
    resister then you could be setting yourself up for electrocution. As I
    recall, the resister should be on the order of 10meg/ohms or something
    like that - low enough to discharge the static, high enough to keep you
    from being killed if you contact 120VAC power.


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    remove 999 in order to email me
  27. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Yes it would, I thought about that after I pressed send. I was thinking in
    terms of most home offices having mostly composite materials which can make
    finding a proper ground problematic. Personally, I tend to prefer not to
    leave the computer plugged in when opening the system. That said, the case
    being metal, could you not attach ground wire to the part of the case you
    remove to open it?

    --
    In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.

    Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    Windows Shell/User
    https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx
    Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/


    "Leythos" <void@nowhere.lan> wrote in message
    news:iwF7e.3431$0V2.500@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com...
    > On Thu, 14 Apr 2005 16:10:30 -0700, Michael Solomon (MS-MVP) wrote:
    >>
    >> Good point. Unfortunately, there's not always something around to which
    >> you can attach the ground wire but I agree, the corded type is better.
    >
    > If you leave the computer plugged into the wall outlet, with a proper
    > grounded plug/outlet, the case/PSU should be grounded - touching it will
    > discharge the static.
    >
    > --
    > spam999free@rrohio.com
    > remove 999 in order to email me
    >
  28. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    It should be all right but you probably should call cyberguys, I believe
    they have a toll free number listed at their website and check with them
    about the concerns raised by Leythos.

    --
    In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.

    Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    Windows Shell/User
    https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx
    Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/


    "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:uZDQ3ZYQFHA.1528@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    > Michael,
    >
    > So, would this be a good corded antistatic strap?
    >
    > http://www.cyberguys.com/templates/searchdetail.asp?T1=116+0120&dept=&search=&child=
    >
    > "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP)" <user@#notme.com> wrote in message
    > news:%23mQPTjSQFHA.2136@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    >> Newbie, be sure to make note of and pay heed to the issue of static
    >> electricity as mentioned in this thread. Cyberguys also sells antistatic
    >> wrist straps and they are relatively inexpensive. They sell both cord
    >> and cordless. The corded type uses a ground wire that must be attached
    >> to something metal, the cordless type must be put on about 15 minutes
    >> prior to doing any work in order for it to properly discharge static
    >> electricity:
    >> http://www.cyberguys.com/templates/SearchAll.asp?s=SA
    >>
    >> --
    >> In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.
    >>
    >> Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    >> Windows Shell/User
    >> https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx
    >> Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    >> DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >>
    >>
    >> "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> news:OhdDLVKQFHA.3496@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    >>> Well, based on everything that was said, I can see there is much a
    >>> difference of opinions on this issue.
    >>>
    >>> I do feel that I will try Mr. Michael Solomon's idea of blowing out the
    >>> case from the product at Cyberguys.
    >>>
    >>> "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >>> news:%23Be7jkjPFHA.2252@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >>>>I have your basic ATX form setup with one side fan, 1 rear. I don't have
    >>>>any additional fans beyond this.
    >>>>
    >>>> I've noticed my side fan is a culprit for quick dust buildup.
    >>>>
    >>>> Anyone have any suggestions for cutting the dust buildup?
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  29. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    On Fri, 15 Apr 2005 13:08:59 -0700, Michael Solomon (MS-MVP) wrote:
    >
    > Yes it would, I thought about that after I pressed send. I was thinking
    > in terms of most home offices having mostly composite materials which
    > can make finding a proper ground problematic. Personally, I tend to
    > prefer not to leave the computer plugged in when opening the system.
    > That said, the case being metal, could you not attach ground wire to the
    > part of the case you remove to open it?

    You can leave the computer plugged into the wall, turn off the power
    switch on the PSU itself (there is almost always a switch on the PSU on
    quality units) or disconnect the power connections from the MB if you
    want, but the safest method is to just allow the electrical ground
    provided by the PSU to the case, to remain in place so that you don't have
    to purchase/do anything, it's already grounded.

    In almost 30 years of working with electronics I've never fried anything
    with static, and with computers being left connected to the power (with
    power off) I've never damaged one yet.

    --
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    remove 999 in order to email me
  30. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Thanks Leythos and thank you for your contributions to this thread, most
    enlightening.

    --
    In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.

    Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    Windows Shell/User
    https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx
    Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/


    "Leythos" <void@nowhere.lan> wrote in message
    news:xDW7e.3715$0V2.1403@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com...
    > On Fri, 15 Apr 2005 13:08:59 -0700, Michael Solomon (MS-MVP) wrote:
    >>
    >> Yes it would, I thought about that after I pressed send. I was thinking
    >> in terms of most home offices having mostly composite materials which
    >> can make finding a proper ground problematic. Personally, I tend to
    >> prefer not to leave the computer plugged in when opening the system.
    >> That said, the case being metal, could you not attach ground wire to the
    >> part of the case you remove to open it?
    >
    > You can leave the computer plugged into the wall, turn off the power
    > switch on the PSU itself (there is almost always a switch on the PSU on
    > quality units) or disconnect the power connections from the MB if you
    > want, but the safest method is to just allow the electrical ground
    > provided by the PSU to the case, to remain in place so that you don't have
    > to purchase/do anything, it's already grounded.
    >
    > In almost 30 years of working with electronics I've never fried anything
    > with static, and with computers being left connected to the power (with
    > power off) I've never damaged one yet.
    >
    > --
    > spam999free@rrohio.com
    > remove 999 in order to email me
    >
  31. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    On Fri, 15 Apr 2005 15:00:03 -0700, Michael Solomon (MS-MVP) wrote:
    >
    > Thanks Leythos and thank you for your contributions to this thread, most
    > enlightening.

    Thank you, I just like to give back as I've learned a lot from Usenet over
    the last 20 years.

    --
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    remove 999 in order to email me
  32. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    I got an email about using one of those little computer vac's and blower
    units to clean systems, here is what I responded - in case anyone is
    interested.

    The question was about this device:
    Can you recommend the best antistatic products and steps I should use when
    I use this product below?

    http://www.cyberguys.com/templates/searchdetail.asp?T1=114+0570&dept=&search=&child


    Here is my reply:

    There isn't enough information available for the product you selected for
    me to know if the unit it going to generate static. What I can see is that
    it uses a standard 2 prong electrical cord, which means that it does not
    have the "earth ground" prong (the third one), so that also means that it
    might not properly discharge any static if it were to create it.

    When it comes to static and cleaning, I use a poof-can or a real air
    compressor - the cans are metal and if I'm grounded I know that the can is
    too (since it conducts through my body). With the compressor, it has a
    metal fitting at the end of the hose, so the same applies, if I'm grounded
    so is the air exiting the nozzle.

    When it comes to cleaning a computer, via air (inside or out) or via rag
    (only on the outside of the case), I just leave the electrical cord
    connected, turn the power off at the PSU and on the front - remember, the
    new P4 units almost always have power to the motherboard unless you can
    turn off the power on the PSU (the switch I was talking about)

    If you look at this power supply, just below the AV power connector there
    is a small black flip-switch, this would turn off the power and stop the
    supply to the motherboard:
    http://images.tigerdirect.com/skuimages/large/P456-4000-main.jpg at the
    same time, it leaves the computer properly grounded so you can use it as a
    good static discharge point (the case).

    When I hand ANYONE an electronic part, even if they have an ESD strap, I
    always touch them with my finger first - this puts us at the same charge
    level, so the part I'm handing them doesn't get zapped.

    When I put a new motherboard in a computer, I take the box (unopened) to
    the computer, touch the case frequently while opening the box and the ESD
    bag containing the motherboard, then only handle the motherboard directly
    once I've touched the case while also holding the ESD bag right before
    removing the motherboard. I touch the case frequently while working with
    the motherboard in order to maintain a static free install.
  33. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    In article <dp88e.3985$0V2.1131@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com>,
    Leythos <void@nowhere.lan> wrote:
    >I got an email about using one of those little computer vac's and blower
    >units to clean systems, here is what I responded - in case anyone is
    >interested.
    >
    >The question was about this device:
    >Can you recommend the best antistatic products and steps I should use when
    >I use this product below?
    >
    >http://www.cyberguys.com/templates/searchdetail.asp?T1=114+0570&dept=&search=&child
    >
    >
    >Here is my reply:
    >
    >There isn't enough information available for the product you selected for
    >me to know if the unit it going to generate static. What I can see is that
    >it uses a standard 2 prong electrical cord, which means that it does not
    >have the "earth ground" prong (the third one), so that also means that it
    >might not properly discharge any static if it were to create it.
    >
    >When it comes to static and cleaning, I use a poof-can or a real air
    >compressor - the cans are metal and if I'm grounded I know that the can is
    >too (since it conducts through my body). With the compressor, it has a
    >metal fitting at the end of the hose, so the same applies, if I'm grounded
    >so is the air exiting the nozzle.
    >
    >When it comes to cleaning a computer, via air (inside or out) or via rag
    >(only on the outside of the case), I just leave the electrical cord
    >connected, turn the power off at the PSU and on the front - remember, the
    >new P4 units almost always have power to the motherboard unless you can
    >turn off the power on the PSU (the switch I was talking about)
    >
    >If you look at this power supply, just below the AV power connector there
    >is a small black flip-switch, this would turn off the power and stop the
    >supply to the motherboard:
    >http://images.tigerdirect.com/skuimages/large/P456-4000-main.jpg at the
    >same time, it leaves the computer properly grounded so you can use it as a
    >good static discharge point (the case).
    >
    >When I hand ANYONE an electronic part, even if they have an ESD strap, I
    >always touch them with my finger first - this puts us at the same charge
    >level, so the part I'm handing them doesn't get zapped.
    >
    >When I put a new motherboard in a computer, I take the box (unopened) to
    >the computer, touch the case frequently while opening the box and the ESD
    >bag containing the motherboard, then only handle the motherboard directly
    >once I've touched the case while also holding the ESD bag right before
    >removing the motherboard. I touch the case frequently while working with
    >the motherboard in order to maintain a static free install.


    Moving air, by definition, creates electrostatic buildup. Grounding
    the vac doesn't prevent it and grounding the vac and the PC just
    provides an easy path for the discharge. Static below the threshold of
    perception can damage IC components and the effects of damage may not
    be immediate. An all-metal vac and a wire between the nozzle and the
    chassis would probbaly be safe but I've never seen that.

    I use a can of air instead of a power vac and use a wrist strap on any
    part or system when I may get fired if it ceases to function.

    I can't say with any expertese why a can of compressed air is safer
    but I'll guess it's because (a) it's used intermittantly and
    accumulates very little charge (b) there is no electric motor with
    arcing commutator brushes that generate lots of lose electrons and (c)
    It's cold and these is enough local humidity to dissapate the
    charge. Maybe all three.

    I agree that static damage is unlikely, but why take chances.


    --
    a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m

    Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.
  34. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Michael,

    What do you think of this product compared to the one you mentioned?

    http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=1032126&CatId=41

    It seems a bit stronger (5HP vs .5HP the cyberguys product).

    What do you do to prepare yourself when you blow out your case? I want to
    make sure I am prepared. I know there was a lot of strong opinion about this
    and I would like to know what you do.

    Thanks

    Can you list specific products
    "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP)" <user@#notme.com> wrote in message
    news:OSn1%23rtPFHA.2724@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > About every 6 months or so, I use the following to blow out my cases:
    > http://www.cyberguys.com/templates/searchdetail.asp?T1=114+0570&dept=&search=&child=
    >
    > You don't need to use the concentrator, it's fairly powerful and will blow
    > out fans and cases without leaving any residue.
    >
    > --
    > In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.
    >
    > Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    > Windows Shell/User
    > https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx
    > Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    > DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >
    >
    > "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:%23Be7jkjPFHA.2252@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >>I have your basic ATX form setup with one side fan, 1 rear. I don't have
    >>any additional fans beyond this.
    >>
    >> I've noticed my side fan is a culprit for quick dust buildup.
    >>
    >> Anyone have any suggestions for cutting the dust buildup?
    >>
    >
    >
  35. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    As Richard has pointed out, the two vac units are equivalent and frankly,
    you don't really need much more "blow" power than that. Also, I use a
    nozzle with a nice round opening instead of one that is concentrated. You
    don't want to use a concentrated stream that might actually damage something
    delicate. You just want decent air flow through the box. You don't even
    have to move it into the case, just hover above the open case and I
    guarantee it will blow it out. This blower is pretty powerful, powerful
    enough to blow the nozzle right off the blower so I'm careful to hold the
    blower by the handle and where the nozzle is affixed to the blower and I
    just hover it in a more or less circular motion above the case.

    I take standard precautions, much as I would any time I open the case to
    change an add-in card and even if I'm wearing a wristband, I always touch
    some metal before touching the case in order to make sure I've discharged
    any static charge I might be carrying at the time.

    --
    In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.

    Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    Windows Shell/User
    https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx
    Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/


    "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:%23Hel7ouRFHA.1236@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    > Michael,
    >
    > What do you think of this product compared to the one you mentioned?
    >
    > http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=1032126&CatId=41
    >
    > It seems a bit stronger (5HP vs .5HP the cyberguys product).
    >
    > What do you do to prepare yourself when you blow out your case? I want to
    > make sure I am prepared. I know there was a lot of strong opinion about
    > this and I would like to know what you do.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Can you list specific products
    > "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP)" <user@#notme.com> wrote in message
    > news:OSn1%23rtPFHA.2724@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    >> About every 6 months or so, I use the following to blow out my cases:
    >> http://www.cyberguys.com/templates/searchdetail.asp?T1=114+0570&dept=&search=&child=
    >>
    >> You don't need to use the concentrator, it's fairly powerful and will
    >> blow out fans and cases without leaving any residue.
    >>
    >> --
    >> In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.
    >>
    >> Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    >> Windows Shell/User
    >> https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx
    >> Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    >> DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >>
    >>
    >> "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> news:%23Be7jkjPFHA.2252@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >>>I have your basic ATX form setup with one side fan, 1 rear. I don't have
    >>>any additional fans beyond this.
    >>>
    >>> I've noticed my side fan is a culprit for quick dust buildup.
    >>>
    >>> Anyone have any suggestions for cutting the dust buildup?
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  36. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Newbie wrote:

    > Michael,
    >
    > What do you think of this product compared to the one you mentioned?
    >
    > http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=1032126&CatId=41
    >
    > It seems a bit stronger (5HP vs .5HP the cyberguys product).

    5HP in the heading is a misprint. Scroll down to Specifications and you
    will find it is also .5HP
  37. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Look closely. It is .5 HP. A 5 HP motor would need 220-440 volts to run.

    --
    Regards,

    Richard Urban

    aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)

    If you knew as much as you think you know,
    You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!


    "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:%23Hel7ouRFHA.1236@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    > Michael,
    >
    > What do you think of this product compared to the one you mentioned?
    >
    > http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=1032126&CatId=41
    >
    > It seems a bit stronger (5HP vs .5HP the cyberguys product).
    >
    > What do you do to prepare yourself when you blow out your case? I want to
    > make sure I am prepared. I know there was a lot of strong opinion about
    > this and I would like to know what you do.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Can you list specific products
    > "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP)" <user@#notme.com> wrote in message
    > news:OSn1%23rtPFHA.2724@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    >> About every 6 months or so, I use the following to blow out my cases:
    >> http://www.cyberguys.com/templates/searchdetail.asp?T1=114+0570&dept=&search=&child=
    >>
    >> You don't need to use the concentrator, it's fairly powerful and will
    >> blow out fans and cases without leaving any residue.
    >>
    >> --
    >> In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.
    >>
    >> Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    >> Windows Shell/User
    >> https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx
    >> Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    >> DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >>
    >>
    >> "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> news:%23Be7jkjPFHA.2252@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >>>I have your basic ATX form setup with one side fan, 1 rear. I don't have
    >>>any additional fans beyond this.
    >>>
    >>> I've noticed my side fan is a culprit for quick dust buildup.
    >>>
    >>> Anyone have any suggestions for cutting the dust buildup?
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  38. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    On Thu, 21 Apr 2005 20:20:33 -0700, Newbie wrote:
    >
    > Michael,
    >
    > What do you think of this product compared to the one you mentioned?
    >
    > http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=1032126&CatId=41
    >
    > It seems a bit stronger (5HP vs .5HP the cyberguys product).

    I like this one:

    http://www.chpower.com/chimages/catalog/active/comp_WL6117_216x500.gif

    Just kidding :)

    --
    spam999free@rrohio.com
    remove 999 in order to email me
  39. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    If you look closely they are the same product with different labelling.
    Cyberguys has more (and maybe useless??!) attachments.

    r.

    "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:%23Hel7ouRFHA.1236@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    > Michael,
    >
    > What do you think of this product compared to the one you mentioned?
    >
    > http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=1032126&CatId=41
    >
    > It seems a bit stronger (5HP vs .5HP the cyberguys product).
    >
    > What do you do to prepare yourself when you blow out your case? I want to
    > make sure I am prepared. I know there was a lot of strong opinion about
    > this and I would like to know what you do.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Can you list specific products
    > "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP)" <user@#notme.com> wrote in message
    > news:OSn1%23rtPFHA.2724@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    >> About every 6 months or so, I use the following to blow out my cases:
    >> http://www.cyberguys.com/templates/searchdetail.asp?T1=114+0570&dept=&search=&child=
    >>
    >> You don't need to use the concentrator, it's fairly powerful and will
    >> blow out fans and cases without leaving any residue.
    >>
    >> --
    >> In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.
    >>
    >> Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    >> Windows Shell/User
    >> https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx
    >> Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    >> DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >>
    >>
    >> "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> news:%23Be7jkjPFHA.2252@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >>>I have your basic ATX form setup with one side fan, 1 rear. I don't have
    >>>any additional fans beyond this.
    >>>
    >>> I've noticed my side fan is a culprit for quick dust buildup.
    >>>
    >>> Anyone have any suggestions for cutting the dust buildup?
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  40. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Correct, as they pertain to blowing dust out of a PC case, the other
    attachments are useless. At least I find all but the primary attachment
    with circular opening to be useless in that regard. However, you may find
    other uses for this blower and some of those attachments are useful in other
    areas in which you might use some of the other attachments.

    --
    In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.

    Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    Windows Shell/User
    https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx
    Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/


    "namniar" <this@that> wrote in message
    news:uz%23bLU0RFHA.3356@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    > If you look closely they are the same product with different labelling.
    > Cyberguys has more (and maybe useless??!) attachments.
    >
    > r.
    >
    > "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:%23Hel7ouRFHA.1236@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    >> Michael,
    >>
    >> What do you think of this product compared to the one you mentioned?
    >>
    >> http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=1032126&CatId=41
    >>
    >> It seems a bit stronger (5HP vs .5HP the cyberguys product).
    >>
    >> What do you do to prepare yourself when you blow out your case? I want to
    >> make sure I am prepared. I know there was a lot of strong opinion about
    >> this and I would like to know what you do.
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >>
    >> Can you list specific products
    >> "Michael Solomon (MS-MVP)" <user@#notme.com> wrote in message
    >> news:OSn1%23rtPFHA.2724@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    >>> About every 6 months or so, I use the following to blow out my cases:
    >>> http://www.cyberguys.com/templates/searchdetail.asp?T1=114+0570&dept=&search=&child=
    >>>
    >>> You don't need to use the concentrator, it's fairly powerful and will
    >>> blow out fans and cases without leaving any residue.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> In memory of our dear friend, MVP Alex Nichol.
    >>>
    >>> Michael Solomon MS-MVP
    >>> Windows Shell/User
    >>> https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx
    >>> Backup is a PC User's Best Friend
    >>> DTS-L.Org: http://www.dts-l.org/
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Newbie" <microsoft@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >>> news:%23Be7jkjPFHA.2252@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >>>>I have your basic ATX form setup with one side fan, 1 rear. I don't have
    >>>>any additional fans beyond this.
    >>>>
    >>>> I've noticed my side fan is a culprit for quick dust buildup.
    >>>>
    >>>> Anyone have any suggestions for cutting the dust buildup?
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  41. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    >
    > >>>> Anyone have any suggestions for cutting the dust buildup?
    > >

    I'm experimenting with this and it seems most existing cases are proper
    "rattlers" (poor fit of side panels etc) & colanders (extraneous holes &
    slots in every concevable panel).

    My first step was to cut a 120mm hole in the plastic front bezel at the
    bottom front face of the case and fit a removable 120mm dust filter.
    Same on an 80mm side panel. Both holes have fans fitted behind them, to
    "encourage dust into the filters". That wasn't enough.

    I then taped a j-cloth to cover (but not block) the 3-400 tiny
    side-panel ventilation holes on the motherboard side of the case. This
    can be removed & cleaned very easily. That wasn't enough.

    So I put thin plastic tape over every slot/hole/grill in the case
    (Note: do NOT use sellotape-like material, which gets brittle over time
    - I used a tough, sticky flexible tape, much like electrical insulating
    tape but stickier). I also added a 6-inch long dust "landing pad" in the
    bottom of the case. It's double-sided tape just trimmed to tack on the
    case, the other side has all the sticky surface exposet to trap
    dust/hair & anything else that settles on it. Quite good, but something
    else was letting in dust.

    As I mentioned the case sides aren't airtight. I will look into that
    soon but it's not a big problem.

    What I found was that the open ports let in dust. (And when not cleaned
    prior to use the ports can become erratic, causing error messages etc!).
    So I found some USB dust caps and that's pretty much all I need to do.
    Do a search on Ebay ... they're for sale in the UK now (June 2005)

    HTH, Ray


    --
    Ray_GTIRPosted from http://www.pcreview.co.uk/ newsgroup access
  42. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    #1 way of keeping dust out of your computer...

    KEEP IT OFF THE FLOOR AND KEEP IT UP HIGH!

    All the dust settles to the bottom of your house. If you keep it up in
    a space that doesnt get too dusty and off the floor then you won't have
    that prob. I keep my comp up on my desk in a spot where it wont get too
    much dust and i only half to clean it like 1 every 2 months...even then
    i only half to clean it a lil bit...


    --
    Tweak
  43. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Tweak Wrote:
    >
    > KEEP IT OFF THE FLOOR AND KEEP IT UP HIGH!
    > Tweak I know what you mean, Tweak ;) ... but there are always compromises to
    be made. Here are a few things to consider;-

    * the higher the box, the warmer the ambient air. Apparently, the worst
    place is on a desk in a top-floor bedroom
    * stretching whilst seated is an ergonomic no-no. Whether it's the
    on/off swtich, CD and/or diskette drive.
    * noise! I cannot imagine having a set of fans at ear level - it'd
    drive me mad!

    Better advice;- cold air is at the lowest level in a room, normally.
    So, keep the box low for the best ambient temperature conditions. (The
    top of my desk is currently at 23.2C, the (lower) desk shelf that my
    box is sitting on is at 21.6C. That's where the main inlet fan/filter
    is situated.) Also, keep the frequently-used buttons close and at waist
    level.

    All of my boxes are about 2"/50mm off ground level and all the buttons
    are within arm's reach of my mouse.


    Tweak Wrote:
    >
    > All the dust settles to the bottom of your house.
    > Tweak Apparently, "all" the dust settles mainly on flat surfaces. At whatever
    level the flat surface is at! Otherwise, it settles on surfaces that
    have static electricity buildup like screens, filters, fan blades etc.
    Note: moving air causes static buildup.

    Finally, the point about filters, dust caps and whatever is to trap or
    prevent "in-flight" dust from getting into your box, i.e., before it
    has settled.


    --
    Ray_GTIRPosted from http://www.pcreview.co.uk/ newsgroup access
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