Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Maxtor 6Y160P0 wont boot after Ghost attempt

Last response: in Windows XP
Share
April 25, 2005 3:27:12 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I've had XP Home running on a Sony Vaio for a couple of months. The
main hard drive is a 160 gig Maxtor 6Y160P0. I remember when I
initially struggled to install the OS, that XP didn't like this drive
because it was larger than 137 gig or 127 gig (I don't recall, off
hand). However, Maxtor's MaxBlast software installed bios that allowed
using the drive and booting to it.
Today, I tried using Ghost 2003 to do a backup to CD. This was a big
mistake and I'll never use Ghost again.
Ghost gave no indication of anything wrong. It's supposed to reboot
into DOS and run without windows so that it can properly backup the
primary boot drive. Well, it wouldn't boot at all. There was some
problem with Ghost, which I never figured out. I just tried rebooting
back to my hard drive, but the bios appears to have changed. It will
no longer boot to my hard drive either.
I've heard that other people have had this problem, but I've not seen a
detailed solution. I'm hoping I haven't lost the information on the
drive. I'd like to redo the bios, if possible and just reboot to the
hard drive. If I want to do a backup again, I'll try something
besides Ghost.


--
les_stockton
Anonymous
April 25, 2005 3:27:13 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Drive overlay programs (MaxBlast is one of them) cause many problems. They
are installed on an unusable (by the user) part of the hard drive. The
problem is that other programs that are set up to start on a reboot need
this space. Guess what? Something won't work.

I have never needed to use a drive overlay program on any computer that is
newer than 3 years old. There are ways around them - if you ask FIRST!

--
Regards,

Richard Urban

aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)

If you knew as much as you think you know,
You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!


"les_stockton" <les_stockton.1o0npm@pcbanter.net> wrote in message
news:les_stockton.1o0npm@pcbanter.net...
>
> I've had XP Home running on a Sony Vaio for a couple of months. The
> main hard drive is a 160 gig Maxtor 6Y160P0. I remember when I
> initially struggled to install the OS, that XP didn't like this drive
> because it was larger than 137 gig or 127 gig (I don't recall, off
> hand). However, Maxtor's MaxBlast software installed bios that allowed
> using the drive and booting to it.
> Today, I tried using Ghost 2003 to do a backup to CD. This was a big
> mistake and I'll never use Ghost again.
> Ghost gave no indication of anything wrong. It's supposed to reboot
> into DOS and run without windows so that it can properly backup the
> primary boot drive. Well, it wouldn't boot at all. There was some
> problem with Ghost, which I never figured out. I just tried rebooting
> back to my hard drive, but the bios appears to have changed. It will
> no longer boot to my hard drive either.
> I've heard that other people have had this problem, but I've not seen a
> detailed solution. I'm hoping I haven't lost the information on the
> drive. I'd like to redo the bios, if possible and just reboot to the
> hard drive. If I want to do a backup again, I'll try something
> besides Ghost.
>
>
> --
> les_stockton
April 25, 2005 3:47:45 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"les_stockton" <les_stockton.1o0npm@pcbanter.net> wrote in message
news:les_stockton.1o0npm@pcbanter.net...
>
> I've had XP Home running on a Sony Vaio for a couple of months. The
> main hard drive is a 160 gig Maxtor 6Y160P0. I remember when I
> initially struggled to install the OS, that XP didn't like this drive
> because it was larger than 137 gig or 127 gig (I don't recall, off
> hand). However, Maxtor's MaxBlast software installed bios that allowed
> using the drive and booting to it.
> Today, I tried using Ghost 2003 to do a backup to CD. This was a big
> mistake and I'll never use Ghost again.
> Ghost gave no indication of anything wrong. It's supposed to reboot
> into DOS and run without windows so that it can properly backup the
> primary boot drive. Well, it wouldn't boot at all. There was some
> problem with Ghost, which I never figured out. I just tried rebooting
> back to my hard drive, but the bios appears to have changed. It will
> no longer boot to my hard drive either.
> I've heard that other people have had this problem, but I've not seen a
> detailed solution. I'm hoping I haven't lost the information on the
> drive. I'd like to redo the bios, if possible and just reboot to the
> hard drive. If I want to do a backup again, I'll try something
> besides Ghost.
> --
> les_stockton


Les...
Unfortunately "the big mistake" you made (possibly among others) is that you
used that accursed MaxBlast overlay program when you installed your HD. As
any computer repair technician will tell you, these third-party "drive
overlay" programs are curses. They install proprietary non-standard
modifications to your system that will invariably "rise up and bite you" one
day (as might have happened in your situation). And this is even when the
program comes from the manufacturer of the HD you're installing.

Simply stated -- there is *no* place for these types of programs in an XP
environment. The XP partitioning/formatting process during the XP install or
subsequently using XP's Disk Management utility is all you will, or should,
ever need in this area. There are two basic requirements for the XP OS to
recognize large-capacity disks...
1. Your motherboard's BIOS must support large-capacity (> 137 GB) disks.
Your Sony motherboard most certainly does.
2. XP must include SP1 and/or SP2.

The reason "that XP didn't like this drive", meaning it didn't initially
recognize the full capacity of your 160 GB HD was surely because your XP OS
did not include SP1 and/or SP2 at the time of the installation. Had XP
included SP1 and/or SP2 at the time of the OS install, the full capacity of
your HD would have been recognized.

The Ghost 2003 program is a tried-and-true program to clone the contents of
one HD to another HD in order to create & maintain a near-failsafe backup
system. I've used this program with a wide variety of drives to perform more
than a thousand clones over the past few years and it's been a rare
occurrence that I encountered a problem that was due to a deficiency of the
Ghost program.
Whenever I've run into problems, it was invariably due to...
1. Defective disk(s)
2. Misconfigured disk(s)
3. System file corruption on the source disk, and, of course,
4. User error

I am at a complete loss to understand your comments that "the bios appears
to have changed" and "I'd like to redo the bios". At this point it's
impossible to tell how damaged your drive is in terms of system file
corruption and more importantly what process can be used to return it to a
bootable state. Hopefully, at the least, you'll be able to connect the drive
as a second drive on another machine and access its contents in order to
backup whatever critical files you need. Ultimately you may have to "zap"
the drive (in order to remove the traces of that drive overlay program)
using a program such as wipe.com or zap.com or similar programs and then
reinstall XP (with SP1 or SP2) on the drive.
Anna
Related resources
Anonymous
April 25, 2005 12:47:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
news:uG9tLmUSFHA.3336@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> "les_stockton" <les_stockton.1o0npm@pcbanter.net> wrote in message
> news:les_stockton.1o0npm@pcbanter.net...
> >
> > I've had XP Home running on a Sony Vaio for a couple of months. The
> > main hard drive is a 160 gig Maxtor 6Y160P0. I remember when I
> > initially struggled to install the OS, that XP didn't like this drive
> > because it was larger than 137 gig or 127 gig (I don't recall, off
> > hand). However, Maxtor's MaxBlast software installed bios that allowed
> > using the drive and booting to it.
> > Today, I tried using Ghost 2003 to do a backup to CD. This was a big
> > mistake and I'll never use Ghost again.
> > Ghost gave no indication of anything wrong. It's supposed to reboot
> > into DOS and run without windows so that it can properly backup the
> > primary boot drive. Well, it wouldn't boot at all. There was some
> > problem with Ghost, which I never figured out. I just tried rebooting
> > back to my hard drive, but the bios appears to have changed. It will
> > no longer boot to my hard drive either.
> > I've heard that other people have had this problem, but I've not seen a
> > detailed solution. I'm hoping I haven't lost the information on the
> > drive. I'd like to redo the bios, if possible and just reboot to the
> > hard drive. If I want to do a backup again, I'll try something
> > besides Ghost.
> > --
> > les_stockton
>
>
> Les...
> Unfortunately "the big mistake" you made (possibly among others) is that
you
> used that accursed MaxBlast overlay program when you installed your HD. As
> any computer repair technician will tell you, these third-party "drive
> overlay" programs are curses. They install proprietary non-standard
> modifications to your system that will invariably "rise up and bite you"
one
> day (as might have happened in your situation). And this is even when the
> program comes from the manufacturer of the HD you're installing.
>
> Simply stated -- there is *no* place for these types of programs in an XP
> environment. The XP partitioning/formatting process during the XP install
or
> subsequently using XP's Disk Management utility is all you will, or
should,
> ever need in this area. There are two basic requirements for the XP OS to
> recognize large-capacity disks...
> 1. Your motherboard's BIOS must support large-capacity (> 137 GB) disks.
> Your Sony motherboard most certainly does.
> 2. XP must include SP1 and/or SP2.
>
> The reason "that XP didn't like this drive", meaning it didn't initially
> recognize the full capacity of your 160 GB HD was surely because your XP
OS
> did not include SP1 and/or SP2 at the time of the installation. Had XP
> included SP1 and/or SP2 at the time of the OS install, the full capacity
of
> your HD would have been recognized.
>
> The Ghost 2003 program is a tried-and-true program to clone the contents
of
> one HD to another HD in order to create & maintain a near-failsafe backup
> system. I've used this program with a wide variety of drives to perform
more
> than a thousand clones over the past few years and it's been a rare
> occurrence that I encountered a problem that was due to a deficiency of
the
> Ghost program.
> Whenever I've run into problems, it was invariably due to...
> 1. Defective disk(s)
> 2. Misconfigured disk(s)
> 3. System file corruption on the source disk, and, of course,
> 4. User error
>
> I am at a complete loss to understand your comments that "the bios appears
> to have changed" and "I'd like to redo the bios". At this point it's
> impossible to tell how damaged your drive is in terms of system file
> corruption and more importantly what process can be used to return it to a
> bootable state. Hopefully, at the least, you'll be able to connect the
drive
> as a second drive on another machine and access its contents in order to
> backup whatever critical files you need. Ultimately you may have to "zap"
> the drive (in order to remove the traces of that drive overlay program)
> using a program such as wipe.com or zap.com or similar programs and then
> reinstall XP (with SP1 or SP2) on the drive.
> Anna
>
>


don't "zap" your drive like Anna suggests.

If data is critical, then try to recover it first.
Ontrack easy recovery will work great.
Get another HD and hook it up ad primary, and old HD as slave
(do it after you install windows, for your safety)
Use Easy Recovery to back-up your data to primary drive.

Once that's done do "low level format". Every HD manufacturer had this
utility on their website.
You will need to boot into DOS and use it. It will wipe out all "drive
overlay" garbage.

Then you can reinstall windows to your old drive (if you don't have
slipstreamed winxp w/sp1 or 2, then install windows with max size of 137Gb.
You can resize it later on after SP1 or 2 update)
April 25, 2005 2:07:55 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"zibby" <zibby@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:eHUPjTZSFHA.1972@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>
> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
> news:uG9tLmUSFHA.3336@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>> "les_stockton" <les_stockton.1o0npm@pcbanter.net> wrote in message
>> news:les_stockton.1o0npm@pcbanter.net...
>> >
>> > I've had XP Home running on a Sony Vaio for a couple of months. The
>> > main hard drive is a 160 gig Maxtor 6Y160P0. I remember when I
>> > initially struggled to install the OS, that XP didn't like this drive
>> > because it was larger than 137 gig or 127 gig (I don't recall, off
>> > hand). However, Maxtor's MaxBlast software installed bios that allowed
>> > using the drive and booting to it.
>> > Today, I tried using Ghost 2003 to do a backup to CD. This was a big
>> > mistake and I'll never use Ghost again.
>> > Ghost gave no indication of anything wrong. It's supposed to reboot
>> > into DOS and run without windows so that it can properly backup the
>> > primary boot drive. Well, it wouldn't boot at all. There was some
>> > problem with Ghost, which I never figured out. I just tried rebooting
>> > back to my hard drive, but the bios appears to have changed. It will
>> > no longer boot to my hard drive either.
>> > I've heard that other people have had this problem, but I've not seen a
>> > detailed solution. I'm hoping I haven't lost the information on the
>> > drive. I'd like to redo the bios, if possible and just reboot to the
>> > hard drive. If I want to do a backup again, I'll try something
>> > besides Ghost.
>> > --
>> > les_stockton
>>
>>
>> Les...
>> Unfortunately "the big mistake" you made (possibly among others) is that
> you
>> used that accursed MaxBlast overlay program when you installed your HD.
>> As
>> any computer repair technician will tell you, these third-party "drive
>> overlay" programs are curses. They install proprietary non-standard
>> modifications to your system that will invariably "rise up and bite you"
> one
>> day (as might have happened in your situation). And this is even when the
>> program comes from the manufacturer of the HD you're installing.
>>
>> Simply stated -- there is *no* place for these types of programs in an XP
>> environment. The XP partitioning/formatting process during the XP install
> or
>> subsequently using XP's Disk Management utility is all you will, or
> should,
>> ever need in this area. There are two basic requirements for the XP OS to
>> recognize large-capacity disks...
>> 1. Your motherboard's BIOS must support large-capacity (> 137 GB) disks.
>> Your Sony motherboard most certainly does.
>> 2. XP must include SP1 and/or SP2.
>>
>> The reason "that XP didn't like this drive", meaning it didn't initially
>> recognize the full capacity of your 160 GB HD was surely because your XP
> OS
>> did not include SP1 and/or SP2 at the time of the installation. Had XP
>> included SP1 and/or SP2 at the time of the OS install, the full capacity
> of
>> your HD would have been recognized.
>>
>> The Ghost 2003 program is a tried-and-true program to clone the contents
> of
>> one HD to another HD in order to create & maintain a near-failsafe backup
>> system. I've used this program with a wide variety of drives to perform
> more
>> than a thousand clones over the past few years and it's been a rare
>> occurrence that I encountered a problem that was due to a deficiency of
> the
>> Ghost program.
>> Whenever I've run into problems, it was invariably due to...
>> 1. Defective disk(s)
>> 2. Misconfigured disk(s)
>> 3. System file corruption on the source disk, and, of course,
>> 4. User error
>>
>> I am at a complete loss to understand your comments that "the bios
>> appears
>> to have changed" and "I'd like to redo the bios". At this point it's
>> impossible to tell how damaged your drive is in terms of system file
>> corruption and more importantly what process can be used to return it to
>> a
>> bootable state. Hopefully, at the least, you'll be able to connect the
> drive
>> as a second drive on another machine and access its contents in order to
>> backup whatever critical files you need. Ultimately you may have to "zap"
>> the drive (in order to remove the traces of that drive overlay program)
>> using a program such as wipe.com or zap.com or similar programs and then
>> reinstall XP (with SP1 or SP2) on the drive.
>> Anna
>>
>>
>
>
> don't "zap" your drive like Anna suggests.
>
> If data is critical, then try to recover it first.
> Ontrack easy recovery will work great.
> Get another HD and hook it up ad primary, and old HD as slave
> (do it after you install windows, for your safety)
> Use Easy Recovery to back-up your data to primary drive.
>
> Once that's done do "low level format". Every HD manufacturer had this
> utility on their website.
> You will need to boot into DOS and use it. It will wipe out all "drive
> overlay" garbage.
>
> Then you can reinstall windows to your old drive (if you don't have
> slipstreamed winxp w/sp1 or 2, then install windows with max size of
> 137Gb.
> You can resize it later on after SP1 or 2 update)


First of all, I did *not* recommend the OP *first* zap his or her drive. As
I stated, if the problem drive is unbootable, an effort should be made to
connect it as a second drive on another machine (or the same machine if the
OP has a bootable drive) and the contents of the problem drive can
(hopefully) be accessed and critical files backed up. There's no question
that an effort should be made to recover critical data. zibby's
recommendation of using a so-called recovery program such as the Ontrack one
is surely one to consider. Whether it will work "great" is another matter.
All these recovery programs are iffy at best in my experience but they're
certainly worth a try in this situation. In my opinion, at this stage, the
best course of action for the OP to take is to connect that unbootable drive
as a second drive on a booting machine and access the contents through that
means.

zibby's other recommendation to perform a "low level format" of the OP's HD
is nonsense. The days when a user could perform such a "format" are long
since gone. A true "low level format" can be done only by the HD
manufacturer under very controlled (read, "expensive") conditions. This
process is simply not available to the end user.

Assuming the user has done all that he or she can do to recover the data on
the HD and now wants to return the drive to a usable state so that a fresh
install of the OS can be made without experiencing further problems because
of the original installation of that drive overlay program, the drive *can*
be purged of that infamous program through a relatively simple & effective
means.

There are a number of programs available to do this. The one we have used to
good effect over the years is zap.com. It's a DOS software utility that
writes zeroes to the first 128 sectors on a HD, including the Master Boot
Record and the first Partition Boot Record. It's an effective tool for
eliminating those dreadful drive overlay programs offered by HD
manufacturers. It's also effective in purging the MBR of any virus
infestation.

zap.com was originally available from IBM; however, it is no longer offered
(AFAIK) by Hitachi-IBM. Fortunately, the Zap program (it's a freebie) can be
downloaded from http://www.tburke.net/info/utils/.

After running the executable file, two files will be created - zap.com and
zap.text, the latter file describing the program and its use. Since zap is
designed to work from a DOS environment, the two files (they total about 4
KB) are then copied to a bootable floppy, e.g., a Win9x/Me startup disk or
any DOS bootable floppy.

Using Zap is simplicity itself. At the A:\ prompt you invoke the zap command
together with the HD number, e.g., zap 0. After a confirmation message and
executing the command, the drive will be "zapped" in a moment or two. The
program works in a flash.

Understand that after using zap, all data on the hard drive is, for all
practical purposes UNRECOVERABLE. The drive is returned to a state ready to
be partitioned and formatted.
Anna
Anonymous
April 25, 2005 2:07:56 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"zibby" <zibby@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:%23DASkJaSFHA.3496@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...

< snip >

> There are a number of programs available to do this. The one we have used
> to
> good effect over the years is zap.com. It's a DOS software utility that
> writes zeroes to the first 128 sectors on a HD, including the Master Boot
> Record and the first Partition Boot Record. It's an effective tool for
> eliminating those dreadful drive overlay programs offered by HD
> manufacturers. It's also effective in purging the MBR of any virus
> infestation.

> that's what low level format is

> e.g. utility for maxtor ATA drives

> Lot's of times it's the only way to remove "drive overlay" software.

Overwriting the boot sectors is not in any way a low level format. As Anna
stated on modern drives a low level format cannot be performed by anyone
without very sophisticated equipment. A low level format would rearrange
where the tracks are located on the disk. Overwriting the boot sectors, by
any one of numerous programs, and then partitioning and high level
formatting the drive, again by any one of numerous programs, is what is
required to remove "drive overlay" programs.

Kerry
Anonymous
April 25, 2005 2:41:43 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"les_stockton" <les_stockton.1o0npm@pcbanter.net> wrote in message
news:les_stockton.1o0npm@pcbanter.net...
>
> I've had XP Home running on a Sony Vaio for a couple of months. The
> main hard drive is a 160 gig Maxtor 6Y160P0. I remember when I
> initially struggled to install the OS, that XP didn't like this drive
> because it was larger than 137 gig or 127 gig (I don't recall, off
> hand). However, Maxtor's MaxBlast software installed bios that allowed
> using the drive and booting to it.
> Today, I tried using Ghost 2003 to do a backup to CD. This was a big
> mistake and I'll never use Ghost again.
> Ghost gave no indication of anything wrong. It's supposed to reboot
> into DOS and run without windows so that it can properly backup the
> primary boot drive. Well, it wouldn't boot at all. There was some
> problem with Ghost, which I never figured out. I just tried rebooting
> back to my hard drive, but the bios appears to have changed. It will
> no longer boot to my hard drive either.
> I've heard that other people have had this problem, but I've not seen a
> detailed solution. I'm hoping I haven't lost the information on the
> drive. I'd like to redo the bios, if possible and just reboot to the
> hard drive. If I want to do a backup again, I'll try something
> besides Ghost.
>
>
> --
> les_stockton

You've described in detail the circumstances surrounding
your problem but you have told us nothing about your actual
boot problem. What happens during the boot process?
How far does it get? What messages (if any) do you see?
Anonymous
April 25, 2005 2:41:44 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

les_stockton Wrote:
> "... I've heard that other people have had this problem, but I've not
> seen a detailed solution..."I am not personally knowledgeable about the phenomenon, but on the Low
Rad Board of RADIFIED Forums (link below) I have read about folks
getting stuck in the -"Norton Ghost 2003 DOS Virtual Partition" -and
having to extricate themselves with the -"Ghreboot"- program to work
around BIOS problems - try posting over there:

*http://radified.com/cgi-bin/YaBB/YaBB.cgi*

My recollection is that the HDD contents are not in jeopardy, but that
the problem is incredibly maddening. BTW, CD burners can be at the root
of the problem and not Ghost 2003 -per se -(Am I correct in assuming
that you are not using Ghost 9.0?).

*-El Pescador-*


--
El Pescador
------------------------------------------------------------------------
El Pescador's Profile: http://forum.osnn.net/member.php?userid=8322
View this thread: http://forum.osnn.net/showthread.php?t=69723
Anonymous
April 25, 2005 3:48:18 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

It is NOT the same thing at all!

--
Regards,

Richard Urban

aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)

If you knew as much as you think you know,
You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!


"zibby" <zibby@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:%23DASkJaSFHA.3496@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...

"Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
news:e$RrvAaSFHA.1096@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>
> "zibby" <zibby@nospam.com> wrote in message
> news:eHUPjTZSFHA.1972@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> >
> > "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
> > news:uG9tLmUSFHA.3336@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> >> "les_stockton" <les_stockton.1o0npm@pcbanter.net> wrote in message
> >> news:les_stockton.1o0npm@pcbanter.net...
> >> >
> >> > I've had XP Home running on a Sony Vaio for a couple of months. The
> >> > main hard drive is a 160 gig Maxtor 6Y160P0. I remember when I
> >> > initially struggled to install the OS, that XP didn't like this drive
> >> > because it was larger than 137 gig or 127 gig (I don't recall, off
> >> > hand). However, Maxtor's MaxBlast software installed bios that
> >> > allowed
> >> > using the drive and booting to it.
> >> > Today, I tried using Ghost 2003 to do a backup to CD. This was a big
> >> > mistake and I'll never use Ghost again.
> >> > Ghost gave no indication of anything wrong. It's supposed to reboot
> >> > into DOS and run without windows so that it can properly backup the
> >> > primary boot drive. Well, it wouldn't boot at all. There was some
> >> > problem with Ghost, which I never figured out. I just tried
> >> > rebooting
> >> > back to my hard drive, but the bios appears to have changed. It will
> >> > no longer boot to my hard drive either.
> >> > I've heard that other people have had this problem, but I've not seen
> >> > a
> >> > detailed solution. I'm hoping I haven't lost the information on the
> >> > drive. I'd like to redo the bios, if possible and just reboot to the
> >> > hard drive. If I want to do a backup again, I'll try something
> >> > besides Ghost.
> >> > --
> >> > les_stockton
> >>
> >>
> >> Les...
> >> Unfortunately "the big mistake" you made (possibly among others) is
> >> that
> > you
> >> used that accursed MaxBlast overlay program when you installed your HD.
> >> As
> >> any computer repair technician will tell you, these third-party "drive
> >> overlay" programs are curses. They install proprietary non-standard
> >> modifications to your system that will invariably "rise up and bite
> >> you"
> > one
> >> day (as might have happened in your situation). And this is even when
> >> the
> >> program comes from the manufacturer of the HD you're installing.
> >>
> >> Simply stated -- there is *no* place for these types of programs in an
> >> XP
> >> environment. The XP partitioning/formatting process during the XP
> >> install
> > or
> >> subsequently using XP's Disk Management utility is all you will, or
> > should,
> >> ever need in this area. There are two basic requirements for the XP OS
> >> to
> >> recognize large-capacity disks...
> >> 1. Your motherboard's BIOS must support large-capacity (> 137 GB)
> >> disks.
> >> Your Sony motherboard most certainly does.
> >> 2. XP must include SP1 and/or SP2.
> >>
> >> The reason "that XP didn't like this drive", meaning it didn't
> >> initially
> >> recognize the full capacity of your 160 GB HD was surely because your
> >> XP
> > OS
> >> did not include SP1 and/or SP2 at the time of the installation. Had XP
> >> included SP1 and/or SP2 at the time of the OS install, the full
> >> capacity
> > of
> >> your HD would have been recognized.
> >>
> >> The Ghost 2003 program is a tried-and-true program to clone the
> >> contents
> > of
> >> one HD to another HD in order to create & maintain a near-failsafe
> >> backup
> >> system. I've used this program with a wide variety of drives to perform
> > more
> >> than a thousand clones over the past few years and it's been a rare
> >> occurrence that I encountered a problem that was due to a deficiency of
> > the
> >> Ghost program.
> >> Whenever I've run into problems, it was invariably due to...
> >> 1. Defective disk(s)
> >> 2. Misconfigured disk(s)
> >> 3. System file corruption on the source disk, and, of course,
> >> 4. User error
> >>
> >> I am at a complete loss to understand your comments that "the bios
> >> appears
> >> to have changed" and "I'd like to redo the bios". At this point it's
> >> impossible to tell how damaged your drive is in terms of system file
> >> corruption and more importantly what process can be used to return it
> >> to
> >> a
> >> bootable state. Hopefully, at the least, you'll be able to connect the
> > drive
> >> as a second drive on another machine and access its contents in order
> >> to
> >> backup whatever critical files you need. Ultimately you may have to
> >> "zap"
> >> the drive (in order to remove the traces of that drive overlay program)
> >> using a program such as wipe.com or zap.com or similar programs and
> >> then
> >> reinstall XP (with SP1 or SP2) on the drive.
> >> Anna
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
> > don't "zap" your drive like Anna suggests.
> >
> > If data is critical, then try to recover it first.
> > Ontrack easy recovery will work great.
> > Get another HD and hook it up ad primary, and old HD as slave
> > (do it after you install windows, for your safety)
> > Use Easy Recovery to back-up your data to primary drive.
> >
> > Once that's done do "low level format". Every HD manufacturer had this
> > utility on their website.
> > You will need to boot into DOS and use it. It will wipe out all "drive
> > overlay" garbage.
> >
> > Then you can reinstall windows to your old drive (if you don't have
> > slipstreamed winxp w/sp1 or 2, then install windows with max size of
> > 137Gb.
> > You can resize it later on after SP1 or 2 update)
>
>
> First of all, I did *not* recommend the OP *first* zap his or her drive.
> As
> I stated, if the problem drive is unbootable, an effort should be made to
> connect it as a second drive on another machine (or the same machine if
> the
> OP has a bootable drive) and the contents of the problem drive can
> (hopefully) be accessed and critical files backed up. There's no question
> that an effort should be made to recover critical data. zibby's
> recommendation of using a so-called recovery program such as the Ontrack
> one
> is surely one to consider. Whether it will work "great" is another matter.
> All these recovery programs are iffy at best in my experience but they're
> certainly worth a try in this situation. In my opinion, at this stage, the
> best course of action for the OP to take is to connect that unbootable
> drive
> as a second drive on a booting machine and access the contents through
> that
> means.
>

I used Ontrack easy recovery many times to recover unmounted, corrupted
partitions.
Trust me, this software works.


> zibby's other recommendation to perform a "low level format" of the OP's
> HD
> is nonsense. The days when a user could perform such a "format" are long
> since gone. A true "low level format" can be done only by the HD
> manufacturer under very controlled (read, "expensive") conditions. This
> process is simply not available to the end user.
>
> Assuming the user has done all that he or she can do to recover the data
> on
> the HD and now wants to return the drive to a usable state so that a fresh
> install of the OS can be made without experiencing further problems
> because
> of the original installation of that drive overlay program, the drive
> *can*
> be purged of that infamous program through a relatively simple & effective
> means.
>
> There are a number of programs available to do this. The one we have used
> to
> good effect over the years is zap.com. It's a DOS software utility that
> writes zeroes to the first 128 sectors on a HD, including the Master Boot
> Record and the first Partition Boot Record. It's an effective tool for
> eliminating those dreadful drive overlay programs offered by HD
> manufacturers. It's also effective in purging the MBR of any virus
> infestation.

that's what low level format is

e.g. utility for maxtor ATA drives

Lot's of times it's the only way to remove "drive overlay" software.

>
> zap.com was originally available from IBM; however, it is no longer
> offered
> (AFAIK) by Hitachi-IBM. Fortunately, the Zap program (it's a freebie) can
> be
> downloaded from http://www.tburke.net/info/utils/.
>
> After running the executable file, two files will be created - zap.com and
> zap.text, the latter file describing the program and its use. Since zap is
> designed to work from a DOS environment, the two files (they total about 4
> KB) are then copied to a bootable floppy, e.g., a Win9x/Me startup disk or
> any DOS bootable floppy.
>
> Using Zap is simplicity itself. At the A:\ prompt you invoke the zap
> command
> together with the HD number, e.g., zap 0. After a confirmation message and
> executing the command, the drive will be "zapped" in a moment or two. The
> program works in a flash.
>
> Understand that after using zap, all data on the hard drive is, for all
> practical purposes UNRECOVERABLE. The drive is returned to a state ready
> to
> be partitioned and formatted.
> Anna
>
>
Anonymous
April 25, 2005 3:58:33 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
news:e$RrvAaSFHA.1096@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
>
> After running the executable file, two files will be created - zap.com and
> zap.text, the latter file describing the program and its use. Since zap is
> designed to work from a DOS environment, the two files (they total about 4
> KB) are then copied to a bootable floppy, e.g., a Win9x/Me startup disk or
> any DOS bootable floppy.
>
> Using Zap is simplicity itself. At the A:\ prompt you invoke the zap
command
> together with the HD number, e.g., zap 0. After a confirmation message and
> executing the command, the drive will be "zapped" in a moment or two. The
> program works in a flash.
>
> Understand that after using zap, all data on the hard drive is, for all
> practical purposes UNRECOVERABLE. The drive is returned to a state ready
to
> be partitioned and formatted.
> Anna
>
>

And make sure to use stun gun. It will give HD best "zap" you ever can get.
After you "zap" HD all data along with hard drive itself will be
UNRECOVERABLE

LOL!!!
April 25, 2005 6:42:53 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

(Irrelevant portions of prior postings snipped...)

"Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message...
> First of all, I did *not* recommend the OP *first* zap his or her drive.
> As
> I stated, if the problem drive is unbootable, an effort should be made to
> connect it as a second drive on another machine (or the same machine if
> the
> OP has a bootable drive) and the contents of the problem drive can
> (hopefully) be accessed and critical files backed up. There's no question
> that an effort should be made to recover critical data. zibby's
> recommendation of using a so-called recovery program such as the Ontrack
> one
> is surely one to consider. Whether it will work "great" is another matter.
> All these recovery programs are iffy at best in my experience but they're
> certainly worth a try in this situation. In my opinion, at this stage, the
> best course of action for the OP to take is to connect that unbootable
> drive
> as a second drive on a booting machine and access the contents through
> that
> means.


> zibby's other recommendation to perform a "low level format" of the OP's
> HD
> is nonsense. The days when a user could perform such a "format" are long
> since gone. A true "low level format" can be done only by the HD
> manufacturer under very controlled (read, "expensive") conditions. This
> process is simply not available to the end user.
>
> Assuming the user has done all that he or she can do to recover the data
> on
> the HD and now wants to return the drive to a usable state so that a fresh
> install of the OS can be made without experiencing further problems
> because
> of the original installation of that drive overlay program, the drive
> *can*
> be purged of that infamous program through a relatively simple & effective
> means.
>
> There are a number of programs available to do this. The one we have used
> to
> good effect over the years is zap.com. It's a DOS software utility that
> writes zeroes to the first 128 sectors on a HD, including the Master Boot
> Record and the first Partition Boot Record. It's an effective tool for
> eliminating those dreadful drive overlay programs offered by HD
> manufacturers. It's also effective in purging the MBR of any virus
> infestation.

>
> zap.com was originally available from IBM; however, it is no longer
> offered
> (AFAIK) by Hitachi-IBM. Fortunately, the Zap program (it's a freebie) can
> be
> downloaded from http://www.tburke.net/info/utils/.
>
> After running the executable file, two files will be created - zap.com and
> zap.text, the latter file describing the program and its use. Since zap is
> designed to work from a DOS environment, the two files (they total about 4
> KB) are then copied to a bootable floppy, e.g., a Win9x/Me startup disk or
> any DOS bootable floppy.
>
> Using Zap is simplicity itself. At the A:\ prompt you invoke the zap
> command
> together with the HD number, e.g., zap 0. After a confirmation message and
> executing the command, the drive will be "zapped" in a moment or two. The
> program works in a flash.
>
> Understand that after using zap, all data on the hard drive is, for all
> practical purposes UNRECOVERABLE. The drive is returned to a state ready
> to
> be partitioned and formatted.
> Anna


zibby says...
that's what low level format is (Anna's note: referring to zap.com and
similar programs)

e.g. utility for maxtor ATA drives

Lot's of times it's the only way to remove "drive overlay" software.


zibby:
You're absolutely wrong about the program I mentioned (and similar ones)
being "low level formats". They are *not*, and your saying they are does not
make it so. I have directly witnessed low-level formats of hard drives
undertaken by HD manufacturers and it is a completely different (and
involved) process from simply using programs such as zap.com to (in effect)
overwrite the MBR. You should *not* use that terminology when discussing
these types of programs.

It is true that zap.com and similar programs can be useful in purging a HD
from a corrupted MBR and returning that HD to a state where the drive can
then be effectively re:p artitioned and re:formatted. But it is *not* a
low-level format by any means.

Correct terminology *is* important in the computer world. It's the way we
can effectively communicate with each other. This is *not* an "Alice in
Wonderland" world where a word "means just what I choose it to mean-neither
more nor less."
Anna
Anonymous
April 25, 2005 7:49:33 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message
news:%237lAWacSFHA.3176@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> (Irrelevant portions of prior postings snipped...)
>
> "Anna" <myname@myisp.net> wrote in message...
> > First of all, I did *not* recommend the OP *first* zap his or her drive.
> > As
> > I stated, if the problem drive is unbootable, an effort should be made
to
> > connect it as a second drive on another machine (or the same machine if
> > the
> > OP has a bootable drive) and the contents of the problem drive can
> > (hopefully) be accessed and critical files backed up. There's no
question
> > that an effort should be made to recover critical data. zibby's
> > recommendation of using a so-called recovery program such as the Ontrack
> > one
> > is surely one to consider. Whether it will work "great" is another
matter.
> > All these recovery programs are iffy at best in my experience but
they're
> > certainly worth a try in this situation. In my opinion, at this stage,
the
> > best course of action for the OP to take is to connect that unbootable
> > drive
> > as a second drive on a booting machine and access the contents through
> > that
> > means.
>
>
> > zibby's other recommendation to perform a "low level format" of the OP's
> > HD
> > is nonsense. The days when a user could perform such a "format" are long
> > since gone. A true "low level format" can be done only by the HD
> > manufacturer under very controlled (read, "expensive") conditions. This
> > process is simply not available to the end user.
> >
> > Assuming the user has done all that he or she can do to recover the data
> > on
> > the HD and now wants to return the drive to a usable state so that a
fresh
> > install of the OS can be made without experiencing further problems
> > because
> > of the original installation of that drive overlay program, the drive
> > *can*
> > be purged of that infamous program through a relatively simple &
effective
> > means.
> >
> > There are a number of programs available to do this. The one we have
used
> > to
> > good effect over the years is zap.com. It's a DOS software utility that
> > writes zeroes to the first 128 sectors on a HD, including the Master
Boot
> > Record and the first Partition Boot Record. It's an effective tool for
> > eliminating those dreadful drive overlay programs offered by HD
> > manufacturers. It's also effective in purging the MBR of any virus
> > infestation.
>
> >
> > zap.com was originally available from IBM; however, it is no longer
> > offered
> > (AFAIK) by Hitachi-IBM. Fortunately, the Zap program (it's a freebie)
can
> > be
> > downloaded from http://www.tburke.net/info/utils/.
> >
> > After running the executable file, two files will be created - zap.com
and
> > zap.text, the latter file describing the program and its use. Since zap
is
> > designed to work from a DOS environment, the two files (they total about
4
> > KB) are then copied to a bootable floppy, e.g., a Win9x/Me startup disk
or
> > any DOS bootable floppy.
> >
> > Using Zap is simplicity itself. At the A:\ prompt you invoke the zap
> > command
> > together with the HD number, e.g., zap 0. After a confirmation message
and
> > executing the command, the drive will be "zapped" in a moment or two.
The
> > program works in a flash.
> >
> > Understand that after using zap, all data on the hard drive is, for all
> > practical purposes UNRECOVERABLE. The drive is returned to a state ready
> > to
> > be partitioned and formatted.
> > Anna
>
>
> zibby says...
> that's what low level format is (Anna's note: referring to zap.com and
> similar programs)
>
> e.g. utility for maxtor ATA drives
>
> Lot's of times it's the only way to remove "drive overlay" software.
>
>
> zibby:
> You're absolutely wrong about the program I mentioned (and similar ones)
> being "low level formats". They are *not*, and your saying they are does
not
> make it so. I have directly witnessed low-level formats of hard drives
> undertaken by HD manufacturers and it is a completely different (and
> involved) process from simply using programs such as zap.com to (in
effect)
> overwrite the MBR. You should *not* use that terminology when discussing
> these types of programs.
>
> It is true that zap.com and similar programs can be useful in purging a HD
> from a corrupted MBR and returning that HD to a state where the drive can
> then be effectively re:p artitioned and re:formatted. But it is *not* a
> low-level format by any means.
>
> Correct terminology *is* important in the computer world. It's the way we
> can effectively communicate with each other. This is *not* an "Alice in
> Wonderland" world where a word "means just what I choose it to
mean-neither
> more nor less."
> Anna
>
>

If that makes you happy, he needs to zero-out hard drive.
Zero-out is correct terminology for this process.
Anonymous
April 26, 2005 4:18:32 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Richard

Have you ever tried Western Digital's OnTrack? I did just one time in 1992..
NEVER EVER AGAIN..

--
Mike Hall
MVP - Windows Shell/user

http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm





"Richard Urban" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:efsNeZTSFHA.3664@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> Drive overlay programs (MaxBlast is one of them) cause many problems. They
> are installed on an unusable (by the user) part of the hard drive. The
> problem is that other programs that are set up to start on a reboot need
> this space. Guess what? Something won't work.
>
> I have never needed to use a drive overlay program on any computer that is
> newer than 3 years old. There are ways around them - if you ask FIRST!
>
> --
> Regards,
>
> Richard Urban
>
> aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)
>
> If you knew as much as you think you know,
> You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!
>
>
> "les_stockton" <les_stockton.1o0npm@pcbanter.net> wrote in message
> news:les_stockton.1o0npm@pcbanter.net...
>>
>> I've had XP Home running on a Sony Vaio for a couple of months. The
>> main hard drive is a 160 gig Maxtor 6Y160P0. I remember when I
>> initially struggled to install the OS, that XP didn't like this drive
>> because it was larger than 137 gig or 127 gig (I don't recall, off
>> hand). However, Maxtor's MaxBlast software installed bios that allowed
>> using the drive and booting to it.
>> Today, I tried using Ghost 2003 to do a backup to CD. This was a big
>> mistake and I'll never use Ghost again.
>> Ghost gave no indication of anything wrong. It's supposed to reboot
>> into DOS and run without windows so that it can properly backup the
>> primary boot drive. Well, it wouldn't boot at all. There was some
>> problem with Ghost, which I never figured out. I just tried rebooting
>> back to my hard drive, but the bios appears to have changed. It will
>> no longer boot to my hard drive either.
>> I've heard that other people have had this problem, but I've not seen a
>> detailed solution. I'm hoping I haven't lost the information on the
>> drive. I'd like to redo the bios, if possible and just reboot to the
>> hard drive. If I want to do a backup again, I'll try something
>> besides Ghost.
>>
>>
>> --
>> les_stockton
>
>
Anonymous
April 26, 2005 10:21:11 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Yep! On Track is right up there with MaxBlast. One must remember that the
overlay concept was developed during the 90's, before there were things that
needed a reboot to perform (defraggers etc.)

Both prevent other programs that run on reboot from activating OR, in the
case if a boot time defragmenter, the defragmenter may kick in without the
overlay. What a mess that causes. Time to start fresh.

--
Regards,

Richard Urban

aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)

If you knew as much as you think you know,
You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!


"Mike Hall (MS-MVP)" <mike.hall.mail@sympatico.ca> wrote in message
news:%23ggE3bhSFHA.3372@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Richard
>
> Have you ever tried Western Digital's OnTrack? I did just one time in
> 1992.. NEVER EVER AGAIN..
>
> --
> Mike Hall
> MVP - Windows Shell/user
>
> http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
>
>
>
>
>
> "Richard Urban" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:efsNeZTSFHA.3664@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>> Drive overlay programs (MaxBlast is one of them) cause many problems.
>> They are installed on an unusable (by the user) part of the hard drive.
>> The problem is that other programs that are set up to start on a reboot
>> need this space. Guess what? Something won't work.
>>
>> I have never needed to use a drive overlay program on any computer that
>> is newer than 3 years old. There are ways around them - if you ask FIRST!
>>
>> --
>> Regards,
>>
>> Richard Urban
>>
>> aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)
>>
>> If you knew as much as you think you know,
>> You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!
>>
>>
>> "les_stockton" <les_stockton.1o0npm@pcbanter.net> wrote in message
>> news:les_stockton.1o0npm@pcbanter.net...
>>>
>>> I've had XP Home running on a Sony Vaio for a couple of months. The
>>> main hard drive is a 160 gig Maxtor 6Y160P0. I remember when I
>>> initially struggled to install the OS, that XP didn't like this drive
>>> because it was larger than 137 gig or 127 gig (I don't recall, off
>>> hand). However, Maxtor's MaxBlast software installed bios that allowed
>>> using the drive and booting to it.
>>> Today, I tried using Ghost 2003 to do a backup to CD. This was a big
>>> mistake and I'll never use Ghost again.
>>> Ghost gave no indication of anything wrong. It's supposed to reboot
>>> into DOS and run without windows so that it can properly backup the
>>> primary boot drive. Well, it wouldn't boot at all. There was some
>>> problem with Ghost, which I never figured out. I just tried rebooting
>>> back to my hard drive, but the bios appears to have changed. It will
>>> no longer boot to my hard drive either.
>>> I've heard that other people have had this problem, but I've not seen a
>>> detailed solution. I'm hoping I haven't lost the information on the
>>> drive. I'd like to redo the bios, if possible and just reboot to the
>>> hard drive. If I want to do a backup again, I'll try something
>>> besides Ghost.
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> les_stockton
>>
>>
>
>
!