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Another thermal paste/heatsink question.

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Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
August 18, 2004 1:15:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.soyo (More info?)

In my struggle to get my Thermaltake CPU heatsink/fan unit carefully
placed atop my Athlon XP2800+, while wrestling with those damned clips,
I had to take the heatsink/fan off, disassemble the fan from the
heatsink, re-orient the clip, reassemble the whole schlematzl, and then
I discovered that I had displaced a tiny area of the thermal-transfer
square pad attached to the bottom of the copper core of the heatsink
where it mates to the CPU. It was a VERY small area, but in my
anal-retentive way, I though belt-and-braces overkill would be the best
insurance, so I filled in the area with a small dollop of typical
RatShack silicone/aluminoid thermal-transfer paste.

I haven't fired it up, but now I'm thinking that I read somewhere of
someone else buggering it up the same way, and they were admonished to
thoroughly clean ALL the original thermal transfer naterial square
applied to the mating area of the heatsink, cleaning the whole thing
with alcohol, then apply a high-quality thermal transfer paste, the
reasoning being that the material supplied in the neat little square
patch from Thermaltake is not necessarily the same, nor necessarily
compatible with, the usual old squeeze-tube silicone-based thermal paste
known and loved by generations of electronics builders.

Because I'm one of those Murphy's Law True Believers, I'd like to hear
some opinions on this subject. If I can fry this processor in
nanoseconds without proper heat transfer, as has been stated in this
forum and others, I'd MUCH rather not.

thanks again!

Bart Brown
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
August 18, 2004 11:27:14 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.soyo (More info?)

Barton Brown <bbrown95@comcast.net> wrote in message news:<Tq2dnZmgxc47ML_cRVn-tQ@comcast.com>...

Yes, you should clear off all the old material and replace it with the
new thermal paste and also us it in a light coat. You don't want it to
thick because it will just be squeezed out and gum up area's that
didn't need it.

> In my struggle to get my Thermaltake CPU heatsink/fan unit carefully
> placed atop my Athlon XP2800+, while wrestling with those damned clips,
> I had to take the heatsink/fan off, disassemble the fan from the
> heatsink, re-orient the clip, reassemble the whole schlematzl, and then
> I discovered that I had displaced a tiny area of the thermal-transfer
> square pad attached to the bottom of the copper core of the heatsink
> where it mates to the CPU. It was a VERY small area, but in my
> anal-retentive way, I though belt-and-braces overkill would be the best
> insurance, so I filled in the area with a small dollop of typical
> RatShack silicone/aluminoid thermal-transfer paste.
>
> I haven't fired it up, but now I'm thinking that I read somewhere of
> someone else buggering it up the same way, and they were admonished to
> thoroughly clean ALL the original thermal transfer naterial square
> applied to the mating area of the heatsink, cleaning the whole thing
> with alcohol, then apply a high-quality thermal transfer paste, the
> reasoning being that the material supplied in the neat little square
> patch from Thermaltake is not necessarily the same, nor necessarily
> compatible with, the usual old squeeze-tube silicone-based thermal paste
> known and loved by generations of electronics builders.
>
> Because I'm one of those Murphy's Law True Believers, I'd like to hear
> some opinions on this subject. If I can fry this processor in
> nanoseconds without proper heat transfer, as has been stated in this
> forum and others, I'd MUCH rather not.
>
> thanks again!
>
> Bart Brown
!