Better fax and/or scan software drivers for Canon MP730?

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.periphs.scanners (More info?)

I purchased a Canon MP730 today (04July15) and have been playing with the
software provided with this machine to fax documents directly from my PC.
This is a really cool way to fax something, but I can't help but wonder if
some upgrade is available for this software. Something that would allow me
to specify resolution for example? For example, if I fax a page from a
magazine with photos and text, the arriving fax is a bit hard to read, and I
think it is because the fax resolution is too low.

--
Regards,

Peter Sale
Santa Monica, CA USA
To email me, just pull 'my-leg.'
6 answers Last reply
More about better scan software drivers canon mp730
  1. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.periphs.scanners (More info?)

    In article <8_idnaPm2PwUxmrdRVn-tw@adelphia.com>, psale@adelphia.my-leg.net
    says...
    >
    >
    >I purchased a Canon MP730 today (04July15) and have been playing with the
    >software provided with this machine to fax documents directly from my PC.
    >This is a really cool way to fax something, but I can't help but wonder if
    >some upgrade is available for this software. Something that would allow me
    >to specify resolution for example? For example, if I fax a page from a
    >magazine with photos and text, the arriving fax is a bit hard to read, and I
    >think it is because the fax resolution is too low.


    A couple of possibilities here.

    If about the text, magazine text fonts are usually on the small size, and
    larger fonts are always better for fax. You can help readability by
    selecting Fine resolution. Fine is higher resolution than fax Normal
    resolution, but still not very high, it is just that Normal is lower. And
    the default is Normal resolution unless you select Fine. Normal is for the
    purpose to be smaller and faster to transmit over the phone line, for a
    cheaper long distance call. Normal sends only every other line of pixels, so
    Fine takes twice as long to send, all else the same.

    Not all fax machines can receive Fine resolution. Old inexpensive machines
    may only receive Normal regardless what you try, but fax machines sold in the
    last few years surely can do Fine. And the plain paper machines today print
    better quality than the old ones too. But that is not true of all fax
    machines, which you normally have no clue about, so if you are composing
    something in a word processor to be faxed, be aware it may be received at
    Normal resolution, and use at least 12 pt type for absolutely everything.

    If you are determined, you can increase the size of the magazine text (any
    scanned image) by manipulating to send partial pages. For example you scan
    no more than half fax page width and half fax page length at double
    resolution, 400 dpi line art mode, and then scale that image back to 200 dpi,
    which will double the printed size of that smaller portion, back to be full
    fax page size, but enlarged to double size. It doesnt have to be double
    size, any proportional increase, but the final scaled page must not be larger
    than the regular page size the fax can receive and print.

    If it is about the photos, and if the photos have any importance whatsoever,
    you should instead scan and email the files, instead of using fax. Fax is
    200 dpi line art by design, designed for text. But fax is the absolute pits
    for photo images, and email is usually readily available. Fax is simply not
    designed nor suitable for photo images.

    Fax is really old now, and not up to todays standards, but is still used.

    --
    Wayne
    http://www.scantips.com "A few scanning tips"
  2. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.periphs.scanners (More info?)

    The may depend on the receiving fax and how
    it handles grayscale.

    What are you faxing to?

    --
    WeInk.com Technical Support
    ------------------------------------------------------
    Toll Free Support: 1-888-825-0759
    Toll Free Orders: 1-800-559-3465
    http://www.weink.com/
    Subscribe to our newsletter and
    get up to 15% off your order.
    ------------------------------------------------------
    "Peter Sale" <psale@adelphia.my-leg.net> wrote in message
    news:8_idnaPm2PwUxmrdRVn-tw@adelphia.com...
    > I purchased a Canon MP730 today (04July15) and have been playing with the
  3. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.periphs.scanners (More info?)

    FAX machines have fixed resolution. I believe that they are limited to something like
    (example from an older Brother FAX machine)

    Standard FAX 200 dpi

    "Fine" FAX 400 dpi

    "Photo" FAX 200 dpi with 8 step grayscale!

    The standard (200 dpi) setting will look a bit 'rough,' and the 400 dpi 'Fine' setting may
    help. See if your Scanner/FAX software has a setting for 'Fine.'

    If that's not clean enough, you'll have to send an image file ... JPEG, PNG, or TIFF ...
    and instruct your recipient on how to use a viewing program such as IrfanView, SlowView
    .... or even Internet Explorer (only works for JPEG files).


    "Peter Sale" <psale@adelphia.my-leg.net> wrote in message
    news:8_idnaPm2PwUxmrdRVn-tw@adelphia.com...
    > I purchased a Canon MP730 today (04July15) and have been playing with the
    > software provided with this machine to fax documents directly from my PC.
    > This is a really cool way to fax something, but I can't help but wonder if
    > some upgrade is available for this software. Something that would allow me
    > to specify resolution for example? For example, if I fax a page from a
    > magazine with photos and text, the arriving fax is a bit hard to read, and I
    > think it is because the fax resolution is too low.
    >
    > --
    > Regards,
    >
    > Peter Sale
    > Santa Monica, CA USA
    > To email me, just pull 'my-leg.'
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.periphs.scanners (More info?)

    For some time I have had an internet fax account with www.maxemail.com, and
    I'm testing my MP730 by faxing documents to that account. I know from past
    experience with this internet fax account that it can deliver quite detailed
    results.

    1. Click below for source image as scanned by MP730 and imported directly
    into Acrobat 6.0.
    http://www.petersale.com/images/scans/t300dpi_gs_source.pdf

    2. Click below for fax that was scanned and faxed directly from MP730 fax
    machine
    http://www.petersale.com/images/scans/hi_rez_fax.tif

    3. Click below for PC fax from Acrobat source material in item 1 above.
    http://www.petersale.com/images/scans/mp730_fax2.tif

    3. Click below for PC fax of source JPG image in Photoshop that was as good
    or better than PDF image in item 1 above.
    http://www.petersale.com/images/scans/mp730_fax1.tif

    In any case, when I fax a document directly from my PC I would like to be
    able to specify the same sort of parameters (Standard, Fine, Grayscale,
    etc.) that I am able to specify when I fax a document directly from the
    MP730 machine. Might there me some sort of Driver or Utility upgrade that
    will allow me to do that?

    BTW, what brand and weight of bond (not photographic) paper provides the
    best results with text and photos (real estate brochures) from my new MP730?

    --
    Regards,

    Peter Sale
    Santa Monica, CA USA
    To email me, just pull 'my-leg.'

    "WeInk.com Technical Support" wrote ...
    > The may depend on the receiving fax and how
    > it handles grayscale.
    >
    > What are you faxing to?
  5. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.periphs.scanners (More info?)

    Hi Wayne,
    My original question was whether or not I could upgrade the PC Fax driver
    that got installed along with other software when I installed my Canon MP730
    on my PC? I was hoping that an "upgraded" driver would let me manually
    specify Standard, Fine, Grayscale, etc. fax resolutions. Well, I faxed your
    thoughtful reply to my post to myself (www.maxemail.com) by "printing" your
    post to the Canon MP730 fax "printer". The very nice result can be viewed
    below:
    http://www.petersale.com/images/scans/word_fax.tif

    Actually, you need to save the sauce and then view it with "Windows Picture
    and Fax Viewer" to enjoy the full quality of this fax. In short, it seems
    the MP730 fax PC driver usually does a splendid job of automatically
    setting the appropriate resolution settings, at least for this Outlook
    Express document, and also for jpgs "printed" from Adobe Photoshop. My
    problem was that a b&w resolution was chosen by the fax driver when I
    attempted to "print" to the MP730 Fax driver from within Adobe Acrobat.
    Click below to see what I'm talking about.
    http://www.petersale.com/images/scans/mp730_fax2.tif

    What I wanted was more like the following
    http://www.petersale.com/images/scans/mp730_fax1.tif

    but with fewer "dots."

    --
    Regards,

    Peter Sale
    Santa Monica, CA USA
    To email me, just pull 'my-leg.'

    "Wayne Fulton" <nospam@invalid.com> wrote in message
    news:ao2dnRMi15pZ8mrdRVn-ig@august.net...
    > In article <8_idnaPm2PwUxmrdRVn-tw@adelphia.com>,
    psale@adelphia.my-leg.net
    > says...
    > >
    > >
    > >I purchased a Canon MP730 today (04July15) and have been playing with the
    > >software provided with this machine to fax documents directly from my PC.
    > >This is a really cool way to fax something, but I can't help but wonder
    if
    > >some upgrade is available for this software. Something that would allow
    me
    > >to specify resolution for example? For example, if I fax a page from a
    > >magazine with photos and text, the arriving fax is a bit hard to read,
    and I
    > >think it is because the fax resolution is too low.
    >
    >
    > A couple of possibilities here.
    >
    > If about the text, magazine text fonts are usually on the small size, and
    > larger fonts are always better for fax. You can help readability by
    > selecting Fine resolution. Fine is higher resolution than fax Normal
    > resolution, but still not very high, it is just that Normal is lower. And
    > the default is Normal resolution unless you select Fine. Normal is for the
    > purpose to be smaller and faster to transmit over the phone line, for a
    > cheaper long distance call. Normal sends only every other line of pixels,
    so
    > Fine takes twice as long to send, all else the same.
    >
    > Not all fax machines can receive Fine resolution. Old inexpensive machines
    > may only receive Normal regardless what you try, but fax machines sold in
    the
    > last few years surely can do Fine. And the plain paper machines today
    print
    > better quality than the old ones too. But that is not true of all fax
    > machines, which you normally have no clue about, so if you are composing
    > something in a word processor to be faxed, be aware it may be received at
    > Normal resolution, and use at least 12 pt type for absolutely everything.
    >
    > If you are determined, you can increase the size of the magazine text (any
    > scanned image) by manipulating to send partial pages. For example you
    scan
    > no more than half fax page width and half fax page length at double
    > resolution, 400 dpi line art mode, and then scale that image back to 200
    dpi,
    > which will double the printed size of that smaller portion, back to be
    full
    > fax page size, but enlarged to double size. It doesnt have to be double
    > size, any proportional increase, but the final scaled page must not be
    larger
    > than the regular page size the fax can receive and print.
    >
    > If it is about the photos, and if the photos have any importance
    whatsoever,
    > you should instead scan and email the files, instead of using fax. Fax is
    > 200 dpi line art by design, designed for text. But fax is the absolute
    pits
    > for photo images, and email is usually readily available. Fax is simply
    not
    > designed nor suitable for photo images.
    >
    > Fax is really old now, and not up to todays standards, but is still used.
    >
    > --
    > Wayne
    > http://www.scantips.com "A few scanning tips"
    >
  6. Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers,comp.periphs.scanners (More info?)

    In article <CsWdndLUup9AmWXd4p2dnA@adelphia.com>, psale@adelphia.my-leg.net
    says...
    >
    >
    >Hi Wayne,
    >My original question was whether or not I could upgrade the PC Fax driver
    >that got installed along with other software when I installed my Canon MP730
    >on my PC? I was hoping that an "upgraded" driver would let me manually
    >specify Standard, Fine, Grayscale, etc. fax resolutions. Well, I faxed your
    >thoughtful reply to my post to myself (www.maxemail.com) by "printing" your
    >post to the Canon MP730 fax "printer". The very nice result can be viewed
    >below:
    >http://www.petersale.com/images/scans/word_fax.tif
    >
    >Actually, you need to save the sauce and then view it with "Windows Picture
    >and Fax Viewer" to enjoy the full quality of this fax. In short, it seems
    >the MP730 fax PC driver usually does a splendid job of automatically
    >setting the appropriate resolution settings, at least for this Outlook
    >Express document, and also for jpgs "printed" from Adobe Photoshop. My
    >problem was that a b&w resolution was chosen by the fax driver when I
    >attempted to "print" to the MP730 Fax driver from within Adobe Acrobat.
    >Click below to see what I'm talking about.
    >http://www.petersale.com/images/scans/mp730_fax2.tif
    >
    >What I wanted was more like the following
    >http://www.petersale.com/images/scans/mp730_fax1.tif
    >
    >but with fewer "dots."


    Yes, printing a text source file directly to the fax software is always
    better quality than printing it and then scanning it to fax.

    All three of your images are 200 dpi line art, which is what fax is. Fax
    simply does not know about grayscale. However the one image appears "more
    grayscale" because the software created halftones, scanning first in
    grayscale and then (because fax requires line art) converted to halftone
    patterns of black or white line art dots that similate grayscale, in the same
    way newspaper and magazine photos print grayscale using only black ink in
    halftone patterns. More black dots is darker gray, few black dots is lighter
    gray. You can see this halftone pattern better if the TIF is viewed on the
    video screen larger than 100% size.

    However the low quality is because the screen for fax is only 200 dpi, where
    magazine screens are usually 2400 dpi, so there will be huge differences in
    the detail and quality. Fax is simply very low resolution, designed for
    speed on the telephone line and cant compete in most other ways. Fine
    resolution is "full" 200 dpi resolution, and Normal sends only every other
    line, effectively 200x100 dpi. A few fax machines do offer proprietary 300
    dpi modes, often called Super Fine, but this is only useful to other similar
    fax machines when you know they can do it, and is not usable in the general
    case. That telephone time is also 9 times longer than Normal.

    If you scan the image in grayscale mode, the fax software has no choice but
    to convert it to line art. Often this is done with halftones, but sometimes
    simply by threshold, which is the difference in your two cases.

    Possibly more than you want to know, but you can convert grayscale images to
    lineart halftones manually in Photoshop yourself (so that you have full
    control of results), and then simply print that halftoned line art image to
    the fax software. Photoshop menu Image - Mode - Bitmap (bitmap means line
    art to Photoshop). Then if for fax, Output Resolution is always 200 dpi, by
    definition of fax. Then Method is Halftone. Next dialog Frequency, 33 to 45
    lpi will likely give your best results for fax. More Frequency lpi gives
    more detail, but fewer shades of gray. Less lpi gives less detail, but more
    shades of gray. It is a big tradeoff, and which is best depends on the
    individual image, if detail or graytones are most important.

    Specifically, Resolution/Frequency 200 dpi / 40 lpi = 5 pixels per halftone
    cell, or 5x5 halftones, or 26 shades of gray, which is nearly acceptable
    sometimes. 33 lpi is likely better for fax in many photo cases, but 45 lpi
    may be better for graphics. But if you have photos, fax results are doomed
    anyway, and it is much better to instead just use email, why beat yourself
    up? It seems a lost cause.

    Fax doesnt have to use halftones for this. The other bitmap Methods there
    like Dither or Threshold can be excellent too, sometimes better for fax, esp
    Dither. All are ways to simulate gray tones with line art density patterns
    of black dots. Examining results at more than 100% size will help understand
    it. Some fax software does this grayscale to halftone conversion
    automatically, with one fixed set of values for all cases.

    The resolution of fax is very low, too low for photos. Magazines probably
    use 2400 dpi Resolution with 133 or 150 lpi which is 2400/150 = 16 pixels, or
    16x16 cells for 256 shades of gray. Detail AND graytones. But 200 dpi isnt
    much today, however it works for text.

    --
    Wayne
    http://www.scantips.com "A few scanning tips"
Ask a new question

Read More

Printers Fax Canon Software Peripherals