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Belkin UPS battery problems

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Anonymous
June 12, 2005 2:42:58 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I have a Belkin F6H500-USB UPS. Connected devices are a AMD 1700+
computer, a 19' monitor, a cable modem, and a switch/router. The UPS
charge was between 90-96% when the unit switched to the battery power.
However, there was one power problems in the rest of the house. This
event occured again after about a hour. I unplugged everything and let
the unit fully charged over night. I turned it on to check the battery
level before adding the devices. It displayed 100%. Being cautious, I
turned it off and let it charge for another 4-5 hours. Turned it back
on and the battery charge fell to 93%. Bad battery? Also, what would
make unit switch from AC to the battery without any power problems from
the wall outlet?
Anonymous
June 12, 2005 3:40:27 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I just had another event. The UPS battery was sitting at 87% after I
performed a test. 30 minutes passed and then boom. The UPS switched
over to battery. Nothing plugged into the UPS either. I guess thia
points to some internal problem with the unit.
Anonymous
June 12, 2005 4:11:02 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

d28 wrote:

> I just had another event. The UPS battery was sitting at 87% after I
> performed a test. 30 minutes passed and then boom. The UPS switched
> over to battery. Nothing plugged into the UPS either. I guess thia
> points to some internal problem with the unit.
>

OK. UPS batteries are typically of the lead-acid type and
it means that start deteriorating right out of the factory
(or when the acid is added). This behavior is about right
for an old battery. Change the battery.
Related resources
June 13, 2005 1:40:55 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

In news:o nPW$E4bFHA.1404@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl,
Ghostrider <-00-@fitron.142> had this to say:

My reply is at the bottom of your sent message:

> d28 wrote:
>
>> I just had another event. The UPS battery was sitting at 87% after I
>> performed a test. 30 minutes passed and then boom. The UPS switched
>> over to battery. Nothing plugged into the UPS either. I guess thia
>> points to some internal problem with the unit.
>>
>
> OK. UPS batteries are typically of the lead-acid type and
> it means that start deteriorating right out of the factory
> (or when the acid is added). This behavior is about right
> for an old battery. Change the battery.

If the battery is fine and Belkin supports this then check the sensitivity
settings through it's GUI. It might be needing to be set to medium perhaps?
(Only three options on the APC hooked up at the moment and I've never used a
Belkin.)

Galen
--

"And that recommendation, with the exaggerated estimate of my ability
with which he prefaced it, was, if you will believe me, Watson, the
very first thing which ever made me feel that a profession might be
made out of what had up to that time been the merest hobby."

Sherlock Holmes
Anonymous
June 13, 2005 12:01:37 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Nothing is making sense now. I took the UPS into a different room (my
family room) and plugged it in to charge. It was off while charging
for about 10-11 hours. I installed the monitor software and it shows a
100% battery level charge. I ran the 10 second test which passed.
Turned it off again for about another 2-3 hours. Then turned it back
on to see if there were any changes (because the times before the
battery level would drop or fluctuate between 85-95%). This time the
battery level still maintained its 100% charge. This morning the
battery level is still at 100%. This after another 6 hours of being
turned off and plugged in to the AC.

Maybe something is happening in my office that is making the UPS switch
over to battery but for the life of me I don't know what it is.
Everything else in the house is fine. The UPS is only acting strange
in my office.
Anonymous
June 14, 2005 11:30:57 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

No meters to speak of. However, since having these problems with the
Belkin F6H500. I purchased a Belkin F6B750-AVR. The AVR (Automatic
Voltage Regulation) feature has exposed some issues within my office.
I was able to determine that when my air conditioning unit fires up the
new UPS's AVR feature would kick in. Which indicated that the UPS was
"cleaning" the current running through the UPS connections. So I now
know the source of the current issues in my office (and home), the AC.

I now agree with everyone else that the battery on the F6H500 is shot.
I had stated the battery was holding a 100%. But it dropped again down
to 87% without anything being plugged into it. So I'm just using it as
a surge protector now. Thanks to all for their input.
June 14, 2005 2:08:50 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

In news:1118673595.260036.63580@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com,
d28 <kevindu28@yahoo.com> had this to say:

My reply is at the bottom of your sent message:

> Nothing is making sense now. I took the UPS into a different room (my
> family room) and plugged it in to charge. It was off while charging
> for about 10-11 hours. I installed the monitor software and it shows
> a 100% battery level charge. I ran the 10 second test which passed.
> Turned it off again for about another 2-3 hours. Then turned it back
> on to see if there were any changes (because the times before the
> battery level would drop or fluctuate between 85-95%). This time the
> battery level still maintained its 100% charge. This morning the
> battery level is still at 100%. This after another 6 hours of being
> turned off and plugged in to the AC.
>
> Maybe something is happening in my office that is making the UPS
> switch over to battery but for the life of me I don't know what it is.
> Everything else in the house is fine. The UPS is only acting strange
> in my office.

Do you have a voltage/multimeter? If so set it to read volts (AC of course)
and stick it into the socket in question. Leave it there for a while and
look at it on occassion. Is it fluxuating? More than a few volts? If it's
only a few volts try the sensitivity that I mentioned in the last response.
If it's more than 5 either way I'd consider a call to a licensed
professional to have the problem looked into. (Note that not all outlets
will read 110 volts. I just ran a short test on one of the older outlets in
a shed - long story - and it ran from 114 to 117 so I'll figure that's
normal for most people.)

Galen
--

"And that recommendation, with the exaggerated estimate of my ability
with which he prefaced it, was, if you will believe me, Watson, the
very first thing which ever made me feel that a profession might be
made out of what had up to that time been the merest hobby."

Sherlock Holmes
Anonymous
June 14, 2005 10:35:28 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

You are making assumptions without even having sufficient
experience. To appreciate why the numbers from the first UPS
could be 100% normal operation, you should get a 3.5 digit
multimeter and do some voltage testing on your car battery.
What is the voltage when charging? What is the voltage after
car is turned off? What it the voltage after sitting
overnight? What is the voltage when hi beams are turned on?
If you can answer these questions from previous experience,
then your UPS reading make complete sense. But since you do
not have experience and do not have the 3.5 digit meter to
gain that experience, then you are only speculating.

Same is speculation about the UPS 'cleaning' your office
electricity. That's nonsense. The air conditioner may be
connected to a circuit wires sufficient for incandescent lamps
but not wires sufficient for electronic equipment.

Follow the wires from wall receptacles back to breaker box.
Did they connect each wire solidly to screw on side of
receptacle? Or did they connect wires in holes behind that
receptacle? If not using the screws, then you have identified
a wiring problem. The resulting low voltage was tripping that
UPS into battery backup mode.

BTW, when does the computer typically see the most 'dirty'
electricity? When UPS is in battery backup mode. Computer
grade UPSes output electricity so dirty as to harm some small
electric motors. And yet that same 'dirty' electricity is
perfectly good for electronic appliances - that have more
resilient hardware.

If you want to learn from your experiences, then you get a
3.5 digit multimeter that is a tool as important as a
screwdriver; so ubiquitous as to be sold in Walmart, Home
Depot, Radio Shack, and Lowes. Also time to inspect each wall
receptacle between breaker box and office. Again, to learn
WHY these things are occurring.

As for those readings, well, what is does the manufacturer
spec for that UPS state is resolution? IOW 87% and 100% are
same readings for a battery at 96%. Numbers that might change
based upon other external factors such as room temperature and
receptacle voltages. No way around the need for that meter if
you want to answer your questions. No way around the need for
those numbers.

You have no way of guessing (with any integrity) about that
battery unless you take numbers with the multimeter (and
report those numbers here to learn other facts not yet
provided).

d28 wrote:
> No meters to speak of. However, since having these problems with the
> Belkin F6H500. I purchased a Belkin F6B750-AVR. The AVR (Automatic
> Voltage Regulation) feature has exposed some issues within my office.
> I was able to determine that when my air conditioning unit fires up the
> new UPS's AVR feature would kick in. Which indicated that the UPS was
> "cleaning" the current running through the UPS connections. So I now
> know the source of the current issues in my office (and home), the AC.
>
> I now agree with everyone else that the battery on the F6H500 is shot.
> I had stated the battery was holding a 100%. But it dropped again down
> to 87% without anything being plugged into it. So I'm just using it as
> a surge protector now. Thanks to all for their input.
!