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full hard drive

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Anonymous
June 17, 2005 7:21:02 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I am running Windows XP with a 40GB HD which has only 32MB free space. I
installed another 80GB HD as a second (slave). How do I move some programming
(applications) to the new HD without having to uninstall and reinstall? Can
this be done, is there an easier way?? Help would be appreciated!
Tami

More about : full hard drive

Anonymous
June 17, 2005 7:21:03 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"tami" <tami@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:FAE9FF1D-257E-4340-BB07-55AA9865CD21@microsoft.com...
>I am running Windows XP with a 40GB HD which has only 32MB free space. I
> installed another 80GB HD as a second (slave). How do I move some
> programming
> (applications) to the new HD without having to uninstall and reinstall?
> Can
> this be done, is there an easier way?? Help would be appreciated!
> Tami

No, you cannot just move folders to the new hard drive, because all the
Windows internal pointers will be wrong.

In the scenario you have given, this is how I would proceed:

1. Back up all critical files and data on the original Hard Drive.
2. Format and install Windows on the 40 GB HDD. This will be your system
drive.
3. Install programs to the 40GB, but use the 80GB for all the files and
data created.
4. Move the swap file and temp files to the 80GB.

the 40GB would be for programs only.
the 80GB would be for everything else.


Bobby
Anonymous
June 18, 2005 12:09:13 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"tami" <tami@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

>I am running Windows XP with a 40GB HD which has only 32MB free space. I
>installed another 80GB HD as a second (slave). How do I move some programming
>(applications) to the new HD without having to uninstall and reinstall? Can
>this be done, is there an easier way?? Help would be appreciated!
>Tami

Very difficult to do this other than by uninstalling and reinstalling
those apps which take large amounts of disk space.

You can move user data files, such as items that are stored in the "My
Documents", "My Pictures", and/or "My Music" folders to the D: drive
without much problem. You just have to be careful when saving new
files that you also put these onto drive D:. You can use TweakUI
http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/downloads/powertoys/...
to change the default location for these items to a folder on drive D:
(instructions courtesy MVP Alex Nichol) Download to a folder with a
short name (eg C:\Tweak), run to extract components, then R-click on
TweakUI.inf and take install, then close the help window that comes up
to allow install to finish. A TweakUI icon will be added to Control
Panel.

Good luck

Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
--
Microsoft MVP
On-Line Help Computer Service
http://onlinehelp.bc.ca

In memory of a dear friend Alex Nichol MVP
http://aumha.org/alex.htm
Related resources
Anonymous
June 18, 2005 1:48:24 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"tami" <tami@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:FAE9FF1D-257E-4340-BB07-55AA9865CD21@microsoft.com...
> I am running Windows XP with a 40GB HD which has only 32MB free space. I
> installed another 80GB HD as a second (slave). How do I move some
programming
> (applications) to the new HD without having to uninstall and reinstall?
Can
> this be done, is there an easier way?? Help would be appreciated!
> Tami

You should start with an audit. It is likely that it's not Windows
or your applications that's filling up your disk but data files.
Moving your data files to your new disk will solve your problem.
Anonymous
June 18, 2005 1:48:25 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Pegasus (MVP) wrote:

> "tami" <tami@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:FAE9FF1D-257E-4340-BB07-55AA9865CD21@microsoft.com...
>
>>I am running Windows XP with a 40GB HD which has only 32MB free space. I
>>installed another 80GB HD as a second (slave). How do I move some
>
> programming
>
>>(applications) to the new HD without having to uninstall and reinstall?
>
> Can
>
>>this be done, is there an easier way?? Help would be appreciated!
>>Tami
>
>
> You should start with an audit. It is likely that it's not Windows
> or your applications that's filling up your disk but data files.
> Moving your data files to your new disk will solve your problem.

Unfortunately some applications come with MASSIVE amounts of data; like
clip art, DVD menu animations or game textures; which the application
insists on storeing in a subfolder within the same folder the
application code is in. The installer only offers a single choice of
instalation drive/folder for the whole thing. In these cases it may be
necessary to install the whole application to the non OS drive.

Example:

Select this folderer for installation:
"C:\Program Files\Acme Software\Cool Game\

Application code would be installed in:
"C:\Program Files\Acme Software\Cool Game\Code\"

Gigabytes of texture and game space data would be installed in:
"C:\Program Files\Acme Software\Cool Game\Resources\"

It only takes TWO CD-ROMS to hold a Gigabyte. Thats right, a single side
single layer DVD only has the capacity of EIGHT CD-Rs! There are plenty
of productivity, graphics and game applications that include three or
more CD ROMs for installation.
Anonymous
June 18, 2005 6:52:01 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"tami" wrote:

> I am running Windows XP with a 40GB HD which has only 32MB free space. I
> installed another 80GB HD as a second (slave). How do I move some programming
> (applications) to the new HD without having to uninstall and reinstall? Can
> this be done, is there an easier way?? Help would be appreciated!
> Tami
-------------------->>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
Well... I'm not an expert, but there is a tools suite named "System Mechanic
5 Professional" Search it in the web... In the shareware version is a tool
named "Relocate Software", in the Maintain section. This tool can move any
installed program to other folder. It goes to the registry to modify the
windows configuration. Even the start menu is changed and redirected to the
new location. Hope this can help you.
Anonymous
June 20, 2005 2:18:23 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

On Fri, 17 Jun 2005 03:21:02 -0700, "tami"

>I am running Windows XP with a 40GB HD which has only 32MB free space.

32M's a bit low, but you can likely free up a good 200M quite
painlessly; more so if you have multiple user accounts, and all of
these accounts have done a lot of web browsing in IE.

>installed another 80GB HD as a second (slave).

You will most likely find the 80G will be faster than the 40G. If you
need to "just" format and rebuild the software installation from
scratch, then I'd suggest using the 80G HD for the OS - or (if you can
control where things go) a smaller partition on that 80G.

The slow part of HD access is moving the heads, and it takes about the
same sort of time to traverse the full "length" of the HD. NTFS parks
some things in the beginning of the volume and other things in the
middle of the volume, so even when the HD is empty, you may be cursed
with head travel at least half the "length" of the HD that defragging
simply won't fix. When the HD fills up, it gets worse.

Now if you put, say, an 8G C: for thge OS on the 40G, no matter how
fragmented that volume gets, head travel is never more than 20% of the
"length" of the HD. Do the same on the 80G, and it's only 10%, with
more data per cylinder and less head skippery. That's why small
partitions on large HDs rock, when it comes to speed - as long as you
aren't stretching the heads over other volumes, or course.

Yep, 8G's enough for XP and core apps, IF you're very proactive about
kicking things to go where you want them to go - left to its own
devices, the OS hasn't much of a clue. That's likely more hard work
than you'd like to do, so I'm not saying it's right for you ;-)


OK; how to free up space.

Step #1: Empty and resize IE web cache

Go into each user account and run Internet Explorer. To Tools,
Internet Options, and on the "front page" of the tabbed dialog, you'll
see Temporaryt Internet Files, Settings. The duhfault will be
something insane, like 128M, 256M or ever over 1G of HD space
alloxcated to yesterday's web scraps, which amount to a couple of Megs
a day, if that. Crunch that down to 20M or so, then purge the cache.

Repeat this process in every user account you can log into. Yup, the
bloat is repeated on a per-account basis.

You can do the same in Netscape or Firefox, but the gains will be
less, as these typically allocate only 50M or sto themselves.

Step #2: Resize your System Restore (SR) allocation

If you're down to 32M free, then chances are SR has suspended itself
already, so hasn't been tracking changes awhile - in which case, the
chances are the SR data's invalid anyway.

To access SR, rt-click on "My Computer" and choose Properties, System
Restore. Each fixed HD volume will have status (Monitoring,
Suspended, or Turned Off) and a slider that says how much space it can
use. You want SR for very short-term recovery, i.e. to undo something
that went wrong within the hour, or at least no more than a day or so
ago - so there's no need to allocate enough space to keep two weeks of
material (though one big install or Service Pack can be over 200M).

By default, SR will allocate a LOT of space to itself. I run 400M on
SR space on my 8G C:, and turn it off on all other volumes as I don't
install any crucial apps on any other volumes. Once again, YMMV, but
if you could shrink it from 4G to 1G, it would be Nice, I'm sure :-)

Step #3: Clear out your Temp files

Easiest way is via the Disk Cleanup tool in Start, Programs,
Accessories, System Tools. Else you'd have to dig into each user
account's Local Settings\Temp and be careful about what you chop
there. I might run Disk Cleanup from each user account, anyway.

Step #4: Don't use Fast User Switching or Hibernate

Fast User Switching will dump currently inactive user account memory
contents to the pagefile (typically on C:; keep it there if you can,
for speed) when switching accounts - and that will bloat the pagefile
and hog space. Hibernating to HD will also dump RAM to HD, and
paradoxically, the more RAM you have, the more that hurts.

Step #5: Dump your material to CDR

No, not talking about copying stuff off HD to CDR to make space; don't
do that just yet. More likely, I'm thinking of material you thought
you'd already written to CDR that's still on HD in the CD Burning
workspace within your user account's subtree.

Once again, each user account has its own CD Burning bay, and thus its
own opportunity to waste a lot of HD space. Repeat the process in
each user account - write the stuff to CDR and/or clear it!

Step #6: Dump the Trash

Both the Recycle Bin, and the Deleted Items from Outlook, OE, or
whatever email app you use.

Step #7: Compact your mailboxes

You can only do this safely if you have a bit of free HD space to
start with. When you "delete" messages from mailboxes, typically the
space they took is not reclaimed, unless you compact the mailbox to
rebuild the indexes etc. Same goes for any other databases.

Start with the smallest database or mailbox files first, leave the
biggest for last, in case the task runs out of workspace.

Step %8: Check your file system

Two aspects to this. First, check the file system for errors using
ChkDsk /F, accepting that this will likely damage or destroy any
already-damaged files, and make them indistinguishable from files that
aren't damaged (until you use them, that is).

Second, look around to see what's taking up space; rt-click on
folders, choose Properties, see the size of the contents. Windows
Explorer will, by default, hide a lot of stuff; set it not to do so,
if you want to see what's up - but then, it's up to you not to delete
unfamiliar things you see for the first time. It's your bulldozer;
drive carefully - Windows welcomes careful drivers.

Third, if you can't figure where all the space is gone, suspect
malware that may be using ADS (Alternate Data Streams). This is a
great hiding place for stuff, as the wretches UI tells you NOTHING
about what's going on there - so download and use a free tool such as
AdAware, MSASBeta that can "see" ADS, or ADS Spy (that's my tool of
choice; also free). Once again, drive carefully.

If you are using FATxx instead of NTFS, there's no ADS to fret about.

Step %9: Careful with disk compression

NTFS supports disk compression on a file-by-file basis, and that can
be tempting at times like these. Be careful not to compress files
that are often in use; it may slow you down quite a bit.

Step %10: Celebratory Defrag

Once you've freed up a lot of space, that's a great time to do a
defrag to snap existing files together, and move all the free space
into nice contiguous lumps (NTFS) or lump (FATxx).


By now, you may find you don't need to panic, swp HDs etc. anymore,
but you may still want to move bloaty stuff from C: to some other
volume. Don't try and move programs, for reasons mentioned
(shortcuts, registry pointers and other dependencies). Instead, find
your My Music, My Pictures and My Videos bloat-buckets, and drag them
with the Right mouse button to the new HD volume, choosing Move when
you release the Right button there.

That's often enough to reset the shell folder pointers in the registry
correctly, but you may want to download and use TweakUI for XP to
check that out. Also, existing apps may have read the pointer to
these locations when they installed, and may now be using the old
value, so be prepared to do the Tools, Options thing in Windows Media
Pimper, Real Player and so on.

Once again, each user account has its own My Videos, My Pictures, My
Music etc. so repeat in all user accounts. You may want to rename the
folders after Rt-dragging them in place so they don't collide; e.g.
"Fred Music", "Mary Music" etc. which also helps keep the names in the
newfangled XP Start Menu straight.

>How do I move some programming (applications) to the new HD
>without having to uninstall and reinstall?

Experimentally, and Carefully. Some games will work, many will not.
MS Office will blow up in your face; don't even think about it.



>------------------------ ---- --- -- - - - -
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better one at http://topicdrift.blogspot.com instead!
>------------------------ ---- --- -- - - - -
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