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Printer question: multipurpose vs. dedicated photo, fixed ..

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Anonymous
a b α HP
July 19, 2004 6:28:16 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

I've just picked up a digital point-and-shoot camera (Canon Powershot
A75) and am trying to decide on the best printer to go with it. For my
computer printing, I've been using a Lexmark Z11 for the past 5 years,
but it's color calibration isn't good enough for printing photos (as an
aside, is there software that can view a scan of the printed image,
compare it to the original and adjust the image as needed?). I'm just
looking to do some basic picture printing, nothing fancy, up to 8x10. I
don't anticipate needing slots in the printer to print directly from the
memory card, but I wouldn't mind being able to print directly from the
camera.

My questions are these:

1. I'm considering the HP PSC 1315xi multipurpose printer. For $100, I
can get a 6-ink, PictBridge printer along with a scanner (not that I
need another one, but my wife would appreciate being able to make copies
without using the computer). How does this compare to the Canon i860,
which appears to be one of the most recommended dedicated photo printer
in the $150 price range.

2. Having a Lexmark, I'm used to replacing my printhead with each
cartridge. Costs a bit more, but it's one less thing to go wrong with
the printer. I understand that HP similarly has it's printhead on the
cartridge, but Epson and Canon have the printhead built into the
printer. Am I better off choosing the HP because there's one less
built-in part to go bad? I reuse the cartridges on my Lexmark,
refilling them until the head eventually clogs (usually because I don't
refill it in time and run it dry). Should I be afraid to use refill ink
on a Canon for fear of ruining the printhead?

Any thoughts / suggestions are appreciated.

More about : printer question multipurpose dedicated photo fixed

Anonymous
a b α HP
July 19, 2004 10:42:49 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

On Mon, 19 Jul 2004 02:28:16 GMT, not really me <nospam@address.com>
wrote:

>I've just picked up a digital point-and-shoot camera (Canon Powershot
>A75) and am trying to decide on the best printer to go with it. For my
>computer printing, I've been using a Lexmark Z11 for the past 5 years,
>but it's color calibration isn't good enough for printing photos (as an
>aside, is there software that can view a scan of the printed image,
>compare it to the original and adjust the image as needed?). I'm just
>looking to do some basic picture printing, nothing fancy, up to 8x10. I
>don't anticipate needing slots in the printer to print directly from the
>memory card, but I wouldn't mind being able to print directly from the
>camera.
>
>My questions are these:
>
>1. I'm considering the HP PSC 1315xi multipurpose printer. For $100, I
>can get a 6-ink, PictBridge printer along with a scanner (not that I
>need another one, but my wife would appreciate being able to make copies
>without using the computer). How does this compare to the Canon i860,
>which appears to be one of the most recommended dedicated photo printer
>in the $150 price range.
>
>2. Having a Lexmark, I'm used to replacing my printhead with each
>cartridge. Costs a bit more, but it's one less thing to go wrong with
>the printer. I understand that HP similarly has it's printhead on the
>cartridge, but Epson and Canon have the printhead built into the
>printer. Am I better off choosing the HP because there's one less
>built-in part to go bad? I reuse the cartridges on my Lexmark,
>refilling them until the head eventually clogs (usually because I don't
>refill it in time and run it dry). Should I be afraid to use refill ink
>on a Canon for fear of ruining the printhead?
>
>Any thoughts / suggestions are appreciated.

The I860 is under $150 plus there is a $30 rebate still in effect from
Canon.

I would highly recommend the I860 and a low cost popular scanner such
as the Canon LIDE20. Bargain hunting should put you around $150 before
rebate.

My I850 and I960 can remain idle for weeks and my I850 remained idle
for 8 weeks with no sign of clogging. I've owned the I850 over one
year now and I use bulk ink refilling which is very economical and
perfectly matched to the original canon inks. Do not use just any ink.
You would want to check here for advise on suppliers. Roughly,
refilling with bulk inks cost $4 or so and the tanks hold more than
twice that of lexmark cartridges

The prints are amazing. WIth proper editing and quality paper, you
could make perfect prints without trouble at all. Text is laser sharp
and overall the printer is extremely fast. You would not be
disappointed with the printer one bit.

If you need the one touch scan and print, etc, the scanner software
may be setup for that. I highly suggest using a good scanning suite
such as Vuescan. With the automated features, you could do your direct
printing and the majority of your color adjusting is done for you.
(its certainly no replacement for a good photo editor)

good luck
July 21, 2004 2:23:19 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

not really me wrote:
> I've just picked up a digital point-and-shoot camera (Canon Powershot
> A75) and am trying to decide on the best printer to go with it. For my
> computer printing, I've been using a Lexmark Z11 for the past 5 years,
> but it's color calibration isn't good enough for printing photos (as an
> aside, is there software that can view a scan of the printed image,
> compare it to the original and adjust the image as needed?). I'm just
> looking to do some basic picture printing, nothing fancy, up to 8x10. I
> don't anticipate needing slots in the printer to print directly from the
> memory card, but I wouldn't mind being able to print directly from the
> camera.
>
> My questions are these:
>
> 1. I'm considering the HP PSC 1315xi multipurpose printer. For $100, I
> can get a 6-ink, PictBridge printer along with a scanner (not that I
> need another one, but my wife would appreciate being able to make copies
> without using the computer). How does this compare to the Canon i860,
> which appears to be one of the most recommended dedicated photo printer
> in the $150 price range.
>
> 2. Having a Lexmark, I'm used to replacing my printhead with each
> cartridge. Costs a bit more, but it's one less thing to go wrong with
> the printer. I understand that HP similarly has it's printhead on the
> cartridge, but Epson and Canon have the printhead built into the
> printer. Am I better off choosing the HP because there's one less
> built-in part to go bad? I reuse the cartridges on my Lexmark,
> refilling them until the head eventually clogs (usually because I don't
> refill it in time and run it dry). Should I be afraid to use refill ink
> on a Canon for fear of ruining the printhead?
>
> Any thoughts / suggestions are appreciated.
>

I have had a variety of printers over the years spanning all of the
major manufacturers and types of technology.

I have completely abandoned any type of printer that has a built in
print head. It doesn't really seem to matter who makes them, they will
clog. (Granted ... if you are using a $50 printer the issue is moot)

My last two printers have been HP's ... one is an old Deskjet 882C (over
4 years old now), and the other is the 7960. Since you get a nice shiny
new printhead with each cartridge, the print quality is always top
notch. To this day, the 882C prints as sharp and crisp as it did on day
one with zero problems.

It seems like the Canon Bubblejet printers that I had would always clog
if left unused for more than about a week at a time. Very frustrating
and expensive. The last printhead I bought cost me $250 at the time
(the printer was over $400 in those days). I hate to think how much ink
was wasted running the cleaning routine. Lots of paper wasted too ...
you stick a sheet of photo paper in, and get a botched print due to a
clog. blech.

My experience with Epson stuff was not much better...

I originally thought that Canon printers with the individual color ink
carts made the most sense. Just replace the color that runs out.
Problem is, when I looked at true ink cost (how many prints per set of
carts) I noticed that the HP's were actually quite a bit more economical
even though it "felt" more expensive when you were in the store buying
cartridges.

Long story short ... I've become sold on HP printers.


(No I don't work for HP) :p 


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Anonymous
a b α HP
July 21, 2004 8:51:26 PM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Hawk <taoHawk2003@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> I originally thought that Canon printers with the individual color ink
> carts made the most sense. Just replace the color that runs out.
> Problem is, when I looked at true ink cost (how many prints per set of
> carts) I noticed that the HP's were actually quite a bit more economical
> even though it "felt" more expensive when you were in the store buying
> cartridges.

This may vary printer to printer. When I was buying a printer/scanner/copier
sort of multi-unit a couple years ago, magazine reviews (PC mag I think) tested
costs to run them by measuring actual ink usage with test prints. The Canon
was something like a third the ink-costs as compared to the comparable HP
unit.

Mike
July 22, 2004 1:25:01 AM

Archived from groups: comp.periphs.printers (More info?)

Anoni Moose wrote:
> Hawk <taoHawk2003@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>
>>I originally thought that Canon printers with the individual color ink
>>carts made the most sense. Just replace the color that runs out.
>>Problem is, when I looked at true ink cost (how many prints per set of
>>carts) I noticed that the HP's were actually quite a bit more economical
>>even though it "felt" more expensive when you were in the store buying
>>cartridges.
>
>
> This may vary printer to printer. When I was buying a printer/scanner/copier
> sort of multi-unit a couple years ago, magazine reviews (PC mag I think) tested
> costs to run them by measuring actual ink usage with test prints. The Canon
> was something like a third the ink-costs as compared to the comparable HP
> unit.

Very true ... I have not sat down to figure it out yet ... but I'm
betting that my 7960 costs a fair bit more to operate than my 882C.

My reference point is comparing the average Bubblejet to the average
Deskjet a couple of years ago.


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