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WinXP Shutdown hangs, hard drive powers off

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  • Hard Drives
  • Shutdown
  • Windows XP
Last response: in Windows XP
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Anonymous
July 6, 2005 1:07:53 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Hi all,

I recently used Ghost 9.0 to transfer the contents of my old hard drive
to a newer hard drive. After the transfer, I've noticed the following
behaviour (nearly 100% of the time, but not always): during shutdown (or
even a reboot), while WinXP is 'saving your settings', the drive will
reach the point where it should automatically shutdown the system.
Instead, only the hard drive powers off and the rest of the system
remains on (monitor receiving a signal, fans running, essentially power
to all other devices). The screen still shows the 'saving your settings'
screen and I can move the mouse cursor around, but nothing else can be
done, of course. Turning off the system using the main power switch
works fine and there doesn't seem to be any other issue with the hard
drive (according to the several diagnostics I've used). There are no
errors within Windows, and the rest of the system is working well.

What I am interested in (besides finding a fix) is how the drive could
power off normally but leave the rest of the system on? I'd expect that,
if it was a service, driver, device, etc, that was hanging the system,
the drive wouldn't reach the point of shutting down either, resulting in
a full system hang. However, that isn't the case here, since the drive
powers down normally. Is the problem within WinXP (btw, I have Home
upgraded to SP2 installed) or with the device itself? The old hard drive
worked fine in shutting down the system. I will be continuing with
various troubleshooting steps (disabling programs/services before
reboot/shutdown mostly) in the meantime. Searches of the net and MS KB
have generated plenty of info on shutdown problems (and I've tried many
of the solutions), but none that I've found make mention of this sort of
behaviour. Hoping someone with more tech knowledge might understand how
or why it could happen.

Any ideas would be of great assistance. Thanks.

More about : winxp shutdown hangs hard drive powers

Anonymous
July 6, 2005 2:22:05 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Just a correction: the shutdown process on screen shows the 'shutting
down' message rather than 'saving your settings' as I mentioned previously.

Kevin wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> I recently used Ghost 9.0 to transfer the contents of my old hard drive
> to a newer hard drive. After the transfer, I've noticed the following
> behaviour (nearly 100% of the time, but not always): during shutdown (or
> even a reboot), while WinXP is 'saving your settings', the drive will
> reach the point where it should automatically shutdown the system.
> Instead, only the hard drive powers off and the rest of the system
> remains on (monitor receiving a signal, fans running, essentially power
> to all other devices). The screen still shows the 'saving your settings'
> screen and I can move the mouse cursor around, but nothing else can be
> done, of course. Turning off the system using the main power switch
> works fine and there doesn't seem to be any other issue with the hard
> drive (according to the several diagnostics I've used). There are no
> errors within Windows, and the rest of the system is working well.
>
> What I am interested in (besides finding a fix) is how the drive could
> power off normally but leave the rest of the system on? I'd expect that,
> if it was a service, driver, device, etc, that was hanging the system,
> the drive wouldn't reach the point of shutting down either, resulting in
> a full system hang. However, that isn't the case here, since the drive
> powers down normally. Is the problem within WinXP (btw, I have Home
> upgraded to SP2 installed) or with the device itself? The old hard drive
> worked fine in shutting down the system. I will be continuing with
> various troubleshooting steps (disabling programs/services before
> reboot/shutdown mostly) in the meantime. Searches of the net and MS KB
> have generated plenty of info on shutdown problems (and I've tried many
> of the solutions), but none that I've found make mention of this sort of
> behaviour. Hoping someone with more tech knowledge might understand how
> or why it could happen.
>
> Any ideas would be of great assistance. Thanks.
July 8, 2005 11:06:25 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Just a little thing - older systems did not have the "automatic off" feature
which allows the OS to communicate to the board which communicates to the
PSU to turn off the computer automatically ( I hope I got that right!).
Damo

"Kevin" <renegade@accesswave_dot_ca> wrote in message
news:o AIJG3igFHA.2880@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Just a correction: the shutdown process on screen shows the 'shutting
> down' message rather than 'saving your settings' as I mentioned
> previously.
>
> Kevin wrote:
>> Hi all,
>>
>> I recently used Ghost 9.0 to transfer the contents of my old hard drive
>> to a newer hard drive. After the transfer, I've noticed the following
>> behaviour (nearly 100% of the time, but not always): during shutdown (or
>> even a reboot), while WinXP is 'saving your settings', the drive will
>> reach the point where it should automatically shutdown the system.
>> Instead, only the hard drive powers off and the rest of the system
>> remains on (monitor receiving a signal, fans running, essentially power
>> to all other devices). The screen still shows the 'saving your settings'
>> screen and I can move the mouse cursor around, but nothing else can be
>> done, of course. Turning off the system using the main power switch works
>> fine and there doesn't seem to be any other issue with the hard drive
>> (according to the several diagnostics I've used). There are no errors
>> within Windows, and the rest of the system is working well.
>>
>> What I am interested in (besides finding a fix) is how the drive could
>> power off normally but leave the rest of the system on? I'd expect that,
>> if it was a service, driver, device, etc, that was hanging the system,
>> the drive wouldn't reach the point of shutting down either, resulting in
>> a full system hang. However, that isn't the case here, since the drive
>> powers down normally. Is the problem within WinXP (btw, I have Home
>> upgraded to SP2 installed) or with the device itself? The old hard drive
>> worked fine in shutting down the system. I will be continuing with
>> various troubleshooting steps (disabling programs/services before
>> reboot/shutdown mostly) in the meantime. Searches of the net and MS KB
>> have generated plenty of info on shutdown problems (and I've tried many
>> of the solutions), but none that I've found make mention of this sort of
>> behaviour. Hoping someone with more tech knowledge might understand how
>> or why it could happen.
>>
>> Any ideas would be of great assistance. Thanks.
Related resources
Anonymous
July 8, 2005 11:06:26 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Hi Damo,

Thanks for the tip, but this system is not an older one and auto-offs
just fine (with the old drive). However, since I posted my message, I've
discovered that the culprit is likely Norton's GoBack. Disabling that
program returned the functionality of having the entire system power
off, and not just the hard drive itself during shutdown (and rebooting
now proceeds smoothly instead of hanging, as well). Not yet sure why,
and not sure if the fix is permanent as of yet (have to keep testing to
see if switching it on causes the problem again and switching off fixes
it). So far, though, it looks like it's the problem. Haven't found
mention of it anywhere else, yet.

Damo wrote:
> Just a little thing - older systems did not have the "automatic off" feature
> which allows the OS to communicate to the board which communicates to the
> PSU to turn off the computer automatically ( I hope I got that right!).
> Damo
>
> "Kevin" <renegade@accesswave_dot_ca> wrote in message
> news:o AIJG3igFHA.2880@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>
>>Just a correction: the shutdown process on screen shows the 'shutting
>>down' message rather than 'saving your settings' as I mentioned
>>previously.
>>
>>Kevin wrote:
>>
>>>Hi all,
>>>
>>>I recently used Ghost 9.0 to transfer the contents of my old hard drive
>>>to a newer hard drive. After the transfer, I've noticed the following
>>>behaviour (nearly 100% of the time, but not always): during shutdown (or
>>>even a reboot), while WinXP is 'saving your settings', the drive will
>>>reach the point where it should automatically shutdown the system.
>>>Instead, only the hard drive powers off and the rest of the system
>>>remains on (monitor receiving a signal, fans running, essentially power
>>>to all other devices). The screen still shows the 'saving your settings'
>>>screen and I can move the mouse cursor around, but nothing else can be
>>>done, of course. Turning off the system using the main power switch works
>>>fine and there doesn't seem to be any other issue with the hard drive
>>>(according to the several diagnostics I've used). There are no errors
>>>within Windows, and the rest of the system is working well.
>>>
>>>What I am interested in (besides finding a fix) is how the drive could
>>>power off normally but leave the rest of the system on? I'd expect that,
>>>if it was a service, driver, device, etc, that was hanging the system,
>>>the drive wouldn't reach the point of shutting down either, resulting in
>>>a full system hang. However, that isn't the case here, since the drive
>>>powers down normally. Is the problem within WinXP (btw, I have Home
>>>upgraded to SP2 installed) or with the device itself? The old hard drive
>>>worked fine in shutting down the system. I will be continuing with
>>>various troubleshooting steps (disabling programs/services before
>>>reboot/shutdown mostly) in the meantime. Searches of the net and MS KB
>>>have generated plenty of info on shutdown problems (and I've tried many
>>>of the solutions), but none that I've found make mention of this sort of
>>>behaviour. Hoping someone with more tech knowledge might understand how
>>>or why it could happen.
>>>
>>>Any ideas would be of great assistance. Thanks.
>
>
>
Anonymous
July 9, 2005 5:22:12 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

The older GoBack (ver 3) instructions specifically tell you to uninstall
GoBack before you use imaging software. Guess you found the reason why (-:

--
Regards,

Richard Urban

Quote from: George Ankner
"If you knew as much as you thought you know,
You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!"

"Kevin" <renegade@accesswave_dot_ca> wrote in message
news:ucVze1$gFHA.2444@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> Hi Damo,
>
> Thanks for the tip, but this system is not an older one and auto-offs just
> fine (with the old drive). However, since I posted my message, I've
> discovered that the culprit is likely Norton's GoBack. Disabling that
> program returned the functionality of having the entire system power off,
> and not just the hard drive itself during shutdown (and rebooting now
> proceeds smoothly instead of hanging, as well). Not yet sure why, and not
> sure if the fix is permanent as of yet (have to keep testing to see if
> switching it on causes the problem again and switching off fixes it). So
> far, though, it looks like it's the problem. Haven't found mention of it
> anywhere else, yet.
>
> Damo wrote:
>> Just a little thing - older systems did not have the "automatic off"
>> feature which allows the OS to communicate to the board which
>> communicates to the PSU to turn off the computer automatically ( I hope I
>> got that right!).
>> Damo
>>
>> "Kevin" <renegade@accesswave_dot_ca> wrote in message
>> news:o AIJG3igFHA.2880@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
>>
>>>Just a correction: the shutdown process on screen shows the 'shutting
>>>down' message rather than 'saving your settings' as I mentioned
>>>previously.
>>>
>>>Kevin wrote:
>>>
>>>>Hi all,
>>>>
>>>>I recently used Ghost 9.0 to transfer the contents of my old hard drive
>>>>to a newer hard drive. After the transfer, I've noticed the following
>>>>behaviour (nearly 100% of the time, but not always): during shutdown (or
>>>>even a reboot), while WinXP is 'saving your settings', the drive will
>>>>reach the point where it should automatically shutdown the system.
>>>>Instead, only the hard drive powers off and the rest of the system
>>>>remains on (monitor receiving a signal, fans running, essentially power
>>>>to all other devices). The screen still shows the 'saving your settings'
>>>>screen and I can move the mouse cursor around, but nothing else can be
>>>>done, of course. Turning off the system using the main power switch
>>>>works fine and there doesn't seem to be any other issue with the hard
>>>>drive (according to the several diagnostics I've used). There are no
>>>>errors within Windows, and the rest of the system is working well.
>>>>
>>>>What I am interested in (besides finding a fix) is how the drive could
>>>>power off normally but leave the rest of the system on? I'd expect that,
>>>>if it was a service, driver, device, etc, that was hanging the system,
>>>>the drive wouldn't reach the point of shutting down either, resulting in
>>>>a full system hang. However, that isn't the case here, since the drive
>>>>powers down normally. Is the problem within WinXP (btw, I have Home
>>>>upgraded to SP2 installed) or with the device itself? The old hard drive
>>>>worked fine in shutting down the system. I will be continuing with
>>>>various troubleshooting steps (disabling programs/services before
>>>>reboot/shutdown mostly) in the meantime. Searches of the net and MS KB
>>>>have generated plenty of info on shutdown problems (and I've tried many
>>>>of the solutions), but none that I've found make mention of this sort of
>>>>behaviour. Hoping someone with more tech knowledge might understand how
>>>>or why it could happen.
>>>>
>>>>Any ideas would be of great assistance. Thanks.
>>
>>
Anonymous
July 9, 2005 2:38:27 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Richard Urban wrote:
> The older GoBack (ver 3) instructions specifically tell you to uninstall
> GoBack before you use imaging software. Guess you found the reason why (-:
>

GoBack was already disabled before I used Ghost (and this is GoBack 4)
because of that exact reason. I do plan ahead. :) 
Anonymous
July 9, 2005 2:38:28 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

This may not have anything to do with your shutdown problem, or it may. Use
the information as you wish. This is well documented in GoBack (at least it
was when it was owned by Roxio).

If you are trying to "transfer/copy/image" an entire drive to another drive,
GoBack must be uninstalled - not just disabled. Part of GoBack writes to a
protected area of a hard drive that "is not" included when an image is
created, but the disabled program is copied. Then when you try to use the
new drive, without the necessary information in the protected area of the
new hard drive, you get boot error messages.

At this point you will find that you can't re-enable GoBack on the new drive
because this information is missing. You also can not uninstall GoBack
because the necessary information is not there.

From the GoBack 4 manual: (sorry about the small text).
24

How is a new disk drive protected?

Before adding, replacing, or formatting a disk drive,

uninstall Norton GoBack using the Windows Add or

Remove Program feature. Remember that when you

uninstall Norton GoBack, any history that Norton GoBack

has collected is deleted. After successfully installing the

new disk drive, reinstall Norton GoBack.


--
Regards,

Richard Urban

Quote from: George Ankner
"If you knew as much as you thought you know,
You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!"

"Kevin" <renegade@accesswave_dot_ca> wrote in message
news:eoyoRuIhFHA.4008@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Richard Urban wrote:
>> The older GoBack (ver 3) instructions specifically tell you to uninstall
>> GoBack before you use imaging software. Guess you found the reason why
>> (-:
>>
>
> GoBack was already disabled before I used Ghost (and this is GoBack 4)
> because of that exact reason. I do plan ahead. :) 
Anonymous
July 9, 2005 5:00:12 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Hmm, interesting. Thanks for posting that info. Originally, I hadn't
been looking for information regarding GoBack, as there wasn't any
indication that it'd be the problem. I followed the Symantec info that
suggests to disable it (turn it off) before 'upgrading or reinstalling'
(on the website). It was only during my own troubleshooting that I
discovered it may be an issue. I was able to enable/disable GoBack just
fine on the new drive, and there were no boot errors or other problems
using it. I've just uninstalled GoBack completely, however, but haven't
reinstalled yet to test it out with a clean install. Your info, though,
suggests that it may work as it should. The section you listed from the
manual I found in the Troubleshooting chapter of the SystemWorks 2005
Premier manual on page 60.

In essence, I guess I didn't plan ahead as much as I thought as I didn't
read the troubleshooting section before encountering any troubles.
That'd have been good to put in the general info part of the GoBack part
of the manual. Funny thing is, Symantec tech support, as usual, didn't
even bother telling me this little tidbit when I sent the message off to
them. It makes me feel less of an idiot (but not too much so).

Thank, Richard, for the help. Much appreciated. Mayhap things will go a
bit smoother now.

Cheers!

Kevin

Richard Urban wrote:
> This may not have anything to do with your shutdown problem, or it may. Use
> the information as you wish. This is well documented in GoBack (at least it
> was when it was owned by Roxio).
>
> If you are trying to "transfer/copy/image" an entire drive to another drive,
> GoBack must be uninstalled - not just disabled. Part of GoBack writes to a
> protected area of a hard drive that "is not" included when an image is
> created, but the disabled program is copied. Then when you try to use the
> new drive, without the necessary information in the protected area of the
> new hard drive, you get boot error messages.
>
> At this point you will find that you can't re-enable GoBack on the new drive
> because this information is missing. You also can not uninstall GoBack
> because the necessary information is not there.
>
> From the GoBack 4 manual: (sorry about the small text).
> 24
>
> How is a new disk drive protected?
>
> Before adding, replacing, or formatting a disk drive,
>
> uninstall Norton GoBack using the Windows Add or
>
> Remove Program feature. Remember that when you
>
> uninstall Norton GoBack, any history that Norton GoBack
>
> has collected is deleted. After successfully installing the
>
> new disk drive, reinstall Norton GoBack.
>
>
Anonymous
July 9, 2005 5:00:13 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

You're welcome Kevin.

I have to agree. Symantec has the worst instructions and help sections of
most any software I have seen. And their support stinks.

--
Regards,

Richard Urban

Quote from: George Ankner
"If you knew as much as you thought you know,
You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!"

"Kevin" <renegade@accesswave_dot_ca> wrote in message
news:%23eR1e9JhFHA.1412@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Hmm, interesting. Thanks for posting that info. Originally, I hadn't been
> looking for information regarding GoBack, as there wasn't any indication
> that it'd be the problem. I followed the Symantec info that suggests to
> disable it (turn it off) before 'upgrading or reinstalling' (on the
> website). It was only during my own troubleshooting that I discovered it
> may be an issue. I was able to enable/disable GoBack just fine on the new
> drive, and there were no boot errors or other problems using it. I've just
> uninstalled GoBack completely, however, but haven't reinstalled yet to
> test it out with a clean install. Your info, though, suggests that it may
> work as it should. The section you listed from the manual I found in the
> Troubleshooting chapter of the SystemWorks 2005 Premier manual on page 60.
>
> In essence, I guess I didn't plan ahead as much as I thought as I didn't
> read the troubleshooting section before encountering any troubles. That'd
> have been good to put in the general info part of the GoBack part of the
> manual. Funny thing is, Symantec tech support, as usual, didn't even
> bother telling me this little tidbit when I sent the message off to them.
> It makes me feel less of an idiot (but not too much so).
>
> Thank, Richard, for the help. Much appreciated. Mayhap things will go a
> bit smoother now.
>
> Cheers!
>
> Kevin
>
> Richard Urban wrote:
>> This may not have anything to do with your shutdown problem, or it may.
>> Use the information as you wish. This is well documented in GoBack (at
>> least it was when it was owned by Roxio).
>>
>> If you are trying to "transfer/copy/image" an entire drive to another
>> drive, GoBack must be uninstalled - not just disabled. Part of GoBack
>> writes to a protected area of a hard drive that "is not" included when an
>> image is created, but the disabled program is copied. Then when you try
>> to use the new drive, without the necessary information in the protected
>> area of the new hard drive, you get boot error messages.
>>
>> At this point you will find that you can't re-enable GoBack on the new
>> drive because this information is missing. You also can not uninstall
>> GoBack because the necessary information is not there.
>>
>> From the GoBack 4 manual: (sorry about the small text).
>> 24
>>
>> How is a new disk drive protected?
>>
>> Before adding, replacing, or formatting a disk drive,
>>
>> uninstall Norton GoBack using the Windows Add or
>>
>> Remove Program feature. Remember that when you
>>
>> uninstall Norton GoBack, any history that Norton GoBack
>>
>> has collected is deleted. After successfully installing the
>>
>> new disk drive, reinstall Norton GoBack.
>>
!