Upgrading hard drives and OS issues

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I am in a percarious spot and I hope someone can help. Here's the deal.....

I have two hard drives right now - a 20GB and a 40GB. I came across a 160GB
at a real bargain and want to dump the 20GB drive to maximize space and
speed. Sounds pretty simple, but I've come across an OS issue. The 20GB was
the original HD for the CPU and I must have been pretty sloppy with files
when I first added the 40GB. Long story short, my CPU won't boot with just
the 40GB drive in place. However, the profile/account that I use appears to
be housed on that 40GB drive.

My dilemma is to make sure I can boot and keep my main profile in tact
because starting over would be a nightmare. Is there a way that I can
install Windows XP so it boots from the 40 or 160 (I'm open to suggestions on
the best choice) and keep the profile that I know exists on the 40 gig drive?
XP will only load when I have the 20GB drive connected - but the profile
that I use is only available when the 40 is also connected. The 40GB drive
alone will not boot the computer at this time.

Ideally, I'd love to use the 160 as a library of media files and games while
the 40 is dedicated to system files.
2 answers Last reply
More about upgrading hard drives issues
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Why not boot the computer from the XP CD into the recovery
    console. Have the 160 GB drive installed and copy the 20 GB
    drive (you'll need to format it, can do that with the
    recovery console) to the 160 GB drive. Then reboot and do a
    repair install on the 160 GB drive which needs to be
    jumpered as Master.

    Check on the procedures and commands you need so you can get
    the job done.

    The recovery console is accessed by selecting the "r" option
    when the CD boots.

    The reinstall option is accessed by simply pressing ENTER
    when the CD boots.

    You will need to have large disk support enabled in the BIOS
    and be using at least SP1.

    You might be better served to just copy the data you need,
    such as settings, password and account names and just
    starting over. This should be easier as long as you have
    not been using encryption.

    If you have been using encryption, unencrypt the
    files/folders before you do the repair or reinstall. Save
    your data to a CD or just leave it on the 40 GB drive, you
    can copy it later.


    --
    The people think the Constitution protects their rights;
    But government sees it as an obstacle to be overcome.
    some support
    http://www.usdoj.gov/olc/secondamendment2.htm


    "ferndaleguy" <ferndaleguy@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote
    in message
    news:359CF2E5-ED91-4A0B-BC3F-D15591B64181@microsoft.com...
    |I am in a percarious spot and I hope someone can help.
    Here's the deal.....
    |
    | I have two hard drives right now - a 20GB and a 40GB. I
    came across a 160GB
    | at a real bargain and want to dump the 20GB drive to
    maximize space and
    | speed. Sounds pretty simple, but I've come across an OS
    issue. The 20GB was
    | the original HD for the CPU and I must have been pretty
    sloppy with files
    | when I first added the 40GB. Long story short, my CPU
    won't boot with just
    | the 40GB drive in place. However, the profile/account
    that I use appears to
    | be housed on that 40GB drive.
    |
    | My dilemma is to make sure I can boot and keep my main
    profile in tact
    | because starting over would be a nightmare. Is there a
    way that I can
    | install Windows XP so it boots from the 40 or 160 (I'm
    open to suggestions on
    | the best choice) and keep the profile that I know exists
    on the 40 gig drive?
    | XP will only load when I have the 20GB drive connected -
    but the profile
    | that I use is only available when the 40 is also
    connected. The 40GB drive
    | alone will not boot the computer at this time.
    |
    | Ideally, I'd love to use the 160 as a library of media
    files and games while
    | the 40 is dedicated to system files.
    |
    |
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Sounds like I'm going to use the 160 GB drive to warehouse everything from
    the 20 GB drive, right? Basically, move everything from the 20 to the 160.
    Format the 160, Then, when I take out the 20, put in the 40 to work with the
    160, my profile should work just fine (as it does with the 20GB/40GB setup)
    but now it'll be a 40/160 setup.

    From what I gather, I'll start by having the 20GB and 160 GB drive in
    together, with the xp cd. Boot it up and use the recovery console once the
    drive is formatted. Can you confirm this?


    I'm not sure if you answered this in your post but do you think I can have
    my computer eventually boot from the 40GB drive and use it as a systems
    drive, and let the 160 be a library for my media? Or is that going to be a
    huge pain?

    I will try what you suggest later today - Thanks!


    "Jim Macklin" wrote:

    > Why not boot the computer from the XP CD into the recovery
    > console. Have the 160 GB drive installed and copy the 20 GB
    > drive (you'll need to format it, can do that with the
    > recovery console) to the 160 GB drive. Then reboot and do a
    > repair install on the 160 GB drive which needs to be
    > jumpered as Master.
    >
    > Check on the procedures and commands you need so you can get
    > the job done.
    >
    > The recovery console is accessed by selecting the "r" option
    > when the CD boots.
    >
    > The reinstall option is accessed by simply pressing ENTER
    > when the CD boots.
    >
    > You will need to have large disk support enabled in the BIOS
    > and be using at least SP1.
    >
    > You might be better served to just copy the data you need,
    > such as settings, password and account names and just
    > starting over. This should be easier as long as you have
    > not been using encryption.
    >
    > If you have been using encryption, unencrypt the
    > files/folders before you do the repair or reinstall. Save
    > your data to a CD or just leave it on the 40 GB drive, you
    > can copy it later.
    >
    >
    > --
    > The people think the Constitution protects their rights;
    > But government sees it as an obstacle to be overcome.
    > some support
    > http://www.usdoj.gov/olc/secondamendment2.htm
    >
    >
    >
    > "ferndaleguy" <ferndaleguy@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote
    > in message
    > news:359CF2E5-ED91-4A0B-BC3F-D15591B64181@microsoft.com...
    > |I am in a percarious spot and I hope someone can help.
    > Here's the deal.....
    > |
    > | I have two hard drives right now - a 20GB and a 40GB. I
    > came across a 160GB
    > | at a real bargain and want to dump the 20GB drive to
    > maximize space and
    > | speed. Sounds pretty simple, but I've come across an OS
    > issue. The 20GB was
    > | the original HD for the CPU and I must have been pretty
    > sloppy with files
    > | when I first added the 40GB. Long story short, my CPU
    > won't boot with just
    > | the 40GB drive in place. However, the profile/account
    > that I use appears to
    > | be housed on that 40GB drive.
    > |
    > | My dilemma is to make sure I can boot and keep my main
    > profile in tact
    > | because starting over would be a nightmare. Is there a
    > way that I can
    > | install Windows XP so it boots from the 40 or 160 (I'm
    > open to suggestions on
    > | the best choice) and keep the profile that I know exists
    > on the 40 gig drive?
    > | XP will only load when I have the 20GB drive connected -
    > but the profile
    > | that I use is only available when the 40 is also
    > connected. The 40GB drive
    > | alone will not boot the computer at this time.
    > |
    > | Ideally, I'd love to use the 160 as a library of media
    > files and games while
    > | the 40 is dedicated to system files.
    > |
    > |
    >
    >
    >
Ask a new question

Read More

Hard Drives Windows XP