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New heatsink and fan combo

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August 7, 2004 12:05:09 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

I have a xp 2800 that's at idle running In the low 50's. Im currently using
the stock heatsink and fan. What im looking for is somthing that will cool
this thing down. I also have four 80mm case fans in my case. I looking for
somthing not to exspensive. But noise is not a problem. I was looking at the
Kingwin KCU-7025 from tiger direct. But don't know if it would be any better
than what i have. Could someone recomend a good one for a good price. Thanks
Jay

More about : heatsink fan combo

Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
August 7, 2004 2:37:43 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

>I have a xp 2800 that's at idle running In the low 50's. Im currently using
>the stock heatsink and fan. What im looking for is somthing that will cool
>this thing down. I also have four 80mm case fans in my case. I looking for
>somthing not to exspensive. But noise is not a problem. I was looking at the
>Kingwin KCU-7025 from tiger direct. But don't know if it would be any better
>than what i have. Could someone recomend a good one for a good price. Thanks
>Jay

Get a 60mm to 80mm fan adapter and a sunon 80mm fan,
lap the heatsink, use arctic silver, and poof...instant cool for cheap.

Been my experience EVERYTHING between this basic setup
and the top of the line air cooled solution
(Thermaltake SLK-900 - vantec 92mm tornado combo)
is a waste of money, price/performance wise.




Ski
"The only way to find out how far is too far...
is to go there"
(remove spleen to e-mail)
August 7, 2004 2:37:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

On 06 Aug 2004 22:37:43 GMT, somebody wrote:

>Get a 60mm to 80mm fan adapter and a sunon 80mm fan,
>lap the heatsink, use arctic silver, and poof...instant cool for cheap.
>
>Been my experience EVERYTHING between this basic setup
>and the top of the line air cooled solution
>(Thermaltake SLK-900 - vantec 92mm tornado combo)
>is a waste of money, price/performance wise.
>
How do you lap a heatsink? I figure that it means to grind it smooth
in some way, but please give full details. Thanks in advance,

pilgrim
Related resources
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
August 7, 2004 3:37:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

google it...


Ski
"The only way to find out how far is too far...
is to go there"
(remove spleen to e-mail)
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
August 7, 2004 5:40:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

pilgrim wrote:

> On 06 Aug 2004 22:37:43 GMT, somebody wrote:
>
>>Get a 60mm to 80mm fan adapter and a sunon 80mm fan,
>>lap the heatsink, use arctic silver, and poof...instant cool for cheap.
>>
>>Been my experience EVERYTHING between this basic setup
>>and the top of the line air cooled solution
>>(Thermaltake SLK-900 - vantec 92mm tornado combo)
>>is a waste of money, price/performance wise.
>>
> How do you lap a heatsink? I figure that it means to grind it smooth
> in some way, but please give full details. Thanks in advance,
>
> pilgrim


Get a flat plate of glass, steel or heavy plastic, some wet-n-dry sandpaper
and a bit of soapy water. Put a little water on the plate, place a sheet of
sandpaper on the plate, put a little more soapy water on the sandpaper then
begin polishing the bottom of the heatsink in either circular or figure
eight motions, being very careful to keep the heatsink perfectly flat to
the sandpaper. You want a flat, smooth, shiny surface on the bottom of the
heatsink when you are done.

The grit of the paper largely depends on the condition of the heatsink. If
it's nearly perfect, you can start off with 600 and end with 1000 for a
mirror perfect finish. If the bottom is scratched badly or very uneven, you
may have to begin with something as rough as 200, going through finer and
finer grits to get the desired results. It all depends.

That said, the results can be either be very dramtic or a slight drop in cpu
temperature. It all depends on the condition of the heat sink before you
begin this... madness.

For the record, I get the best results if I take the time to lap the
processor also (just don't splash the water onto the processor
electronics). I work slowly, carefully and end up with nearly a mirror
finish on both surfaces and "glue" them together with a smear of Radio
Shack white stuff when I mount the HSF and Processor to the motherboard.

So, happy lapping.



--

******************************************************************************
Registered Linux User Number 185956
FSF Associate Member number 2340 since 05/20/2004
Join me in chat at #linux-users on irc.freenode.net
Buy an Xbox for $149.00, run linux on it and Microsoft loses $150.00!
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Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
August 8, 2004 5:00:57 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

Jerry McBride wrote:
[...]
>
> For the record, I get the best results if I take the time to lap the
> processor also

You're kidding, right? Lapping the die is about the fastest way to kill it,
only just behind using the CPU as a frisbee. The CPU die itself is optically
flat and smooth (or damn close to it anyhow), and the only thing between the
die and the air is a very thin (as in several micron) protective layer. Have
the CPU a fraction of a degree off being perfectly flat with the sandpaper,
or have very slightly uneven pressure applied, and you can kiss your CPU
goodbye.

It *is* possible to lap CPUs with an IHS (P4, A64) or that have a casing
(K6's, older GPUs, GF4's in particular with their concave casing).

> (just don't splash the water onto the processor
> electronics).

You can actually get water all over the CPU, but just make sure that you
rinse it off with clean water afterwards and let it dry very well before
powering it up :) 

[...]

--
Michael Brown
www.emboss.co.nz : OOS/RSI software and more :) 
Add michael@ to emboss.co.nz - My inbox is always open
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
August 8, 2004 9:09:06 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

Have you ever tried just removing the processor and just reinstalling it?
What proof do you have that all the polishing is totally responsible for any
changes?
"Jerry McBride" <mcbrides9@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:lm2fu1xd8n.ln2@spinner.my.domain...
> pilgrim wrote:
>
> > On 06 Aug 2004 22:37:43 GMT, somebody wrote:
> >
> >>Get a 60mm to 80mm fan adapter and a sunon 80mm fan,
> >>lap the heatsink, use arctic silver, and poof...instant cool for cheap.
> >>
> >>Been my experience EVERYTHING between this basic setup
> >>and the top of the line air cooled solution
> >>(Thermaltake SLK-900 - vantec 92mm tornado combo)
> >>is a waste of money, price/performance wise.
> >>
> > How do you lap a heatsink? I figure that it means to grind it smooth
> > in some way, but please give full details. Thanks in advance,
> >
> > pilgrim
>
>
> Get a flat plate of glass, steel or heavy plastic, some wet-n-dry
sandpaper
> and a bit of soapy water. Put a little water on the plate, place a sheet
of
> sandpaper on the plate, put a little more soapy water on the sandpaper
then
> begin polishing the bottom of the heatsink in either circular or figure
> eight motions, being very careful to keep the heatsink perfectly flat to
> the sandpaper. You want a flat, smooth, shiny surface on the bottom of the
> heatsink when you are done.
>
> The grit of the paper largely depends on the condition of the heatsink. If
> it's nearly perfect, you can start off with 600 and end with 1000 for a
> mirror perfect finish. If the bottom is scratched badly or very uneven,
you
> may have to begin with something as rough as 200, going through finer and
> finer grits to get the desired results. It all depends.
>
> That said, the results can be either be very dramtic or a slight drop in
cpu
> temperature. It all depends on the condition of the heat sink before you
> begin this... madness.
>
> For the record, I get the best results if I take the time to lap the
> processor also (just don't splash the water onto the processor
> electronics). I work slowly, carefully and end up with nearly a mirror
> finish on both surfaces and "glue" them together with a smear of Radio
> Shack white stuff when I mount the HSF and Processor to the motherboard.
>
> So, happy lapping.
>
>
>
> --
>
>
****************************************************************************
**
> Registered Linux User Number 185956
> FSF Associate Member number 2340 since 05/20/2004
> Join me in chat at #linux-users on irc.freenode.net
> Buy an Xbox for $149.00, run linux on it and Microsoft loses $150.00!
> 9:28am up 4 days, 16:52, 4 users, load average: 0.02, 0.06, 0.00
August 9, 2004 2:02:48 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

On Sun, 8 Aug 2004 17:09:06 -0400, "notritenoteri"
<coldasfire@hades.com> wrote:

>Have you ever tried just removing the processor and just reinstalling it?
>What proof do you have that all the polishing is totally responsible for any
>changes?


The theological implications alone are staggering.
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
August 9, 2004 2:43:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

Michael Brown wrote:

> Jerry McBride wrote:
> [...]
>>
>> For the record, I get the best results if I take the time to lap the
>> processor also
>
> You're kidding, right? Lapping the die is about the fastest way to kill
> it, only just behind using the CPU as a frisbee. The CPU die itself is
> optically flat and smooth (or damn close to it anyhow),

Not in my experience with XP's, Durons, etc. If you drag your fingernail
across the die surface, you can feel the roughness around the chip
markings. All it takes is a few seconds on like 1000 plus grit and it takes
on the appearence of a mirror. A good auto body supply house will have
wet-n-dry papers up to 14000 grit. Never said I needed to use the rough
stuff...

> and the only thing
> between the die and the air is a very thin (as in several micron)
> protective layer. Have the CPU a fraction of a degree off being perfectly
> flat with the sandpaper, or have very slightly uneven pressure applied,
> and you can kiss your CPU goodbye.
>

It's no worse than lapping the heatsink.

> It *is* possible to lap CPUs with an IHS (P4, A64) or that have a casing
> (K6's, older GPUs, GF4's in particular with their concave casing).
>

K6's? I used to pry the spreader off the chip and then lap the die blob to a
flat surface. Never killed one in all the years I did it and in fact, I
still have a server with a lapped k6 in it running 24/7 on my home lan.

>> (just don't splash the water onto the processor
>> electronics).
>
> You can actually get water all over the CPU, but just make sure that you
> rinse it off with clean water afterwards and let it dry very well before
> powering it up :) 
>

I'm more concerned about washing microscopic bits of lapped metal into or
under the surface mounted components. I'm just a tad bit careful not to get
the lapped juices into the works... It just makes good sense.

Cheers.

--

******************************************************************************
Registered Linux User Number 185956
FSF Associate Member number 2340 since 05/20/2004
Join me in chat at #linux-users on irc.freenode.net
Buy an Xbox for $149.00, run linux on it and Microsoft loses $150.00!
6:34am up 6 days, 13:58, 4 users, load average: 0.85, 1.00, 1.17
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
August 9, 2004 7:52:45 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

So are the monetary!
<_ _ _> wrote in message news:ifbfh0dpt4ugoe6hhaara5gsa3vjpr8geb@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 8 Aug 2004 17:09:06 -0400, "notritenoteri"
> <coldasfire@hades.com> wrote:
>
> >Have you ever tried just removing the processor and just reinstalling
it?
> >What proof do you have that all the polishing is totally responsible for
any
> >changes?
>
>
> The theological implications alone are staggering.
>
>
!