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AMD64 FX-53 - Idle Temp Too High?

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Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
August 23, 2004 1:02:19 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

Hello all, I have an AMD64 FX-53 and with the stock fan I was average
52c. I switched to a Tt Venus 12 copper heatsink/fan and see it now
idle around 45c.

I've seen benchmarks of this same CPU with other air cooling systems
and these guys are reaching in the 30's when idle. Is there something
I'm doing wrong? I've made sure that all cables are tied up and that
there is an "s" shaped air flow within the case.

For the record with the case open I've gotten down into the 30's. But
isn't it crazy to keep the case open all of the time just to maintain
a dencent temperature?

Is 45c for my setup average? What cooling systems would you
recommend?

lloydgm

More about : amd64 idle temp high

Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
August 23, 2004 6:55:37 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

On Sun, 22 Aug 2004 21:02:19 -0700, lloydgm wrote:

> For the record with the case open I've gotten down into the 30's. But
> isn't it crazy to keep the case open all of the time just to maintain
> a dencent temperature?
>
It sure is, that's why it appears you need better case coolong. The cpu
will never get lower than the intake air of the cooler, so if the intake
air in the case is 40C....... Personally, I like to have the case temp
within about 6C of room temp. i keep my room at 24C. Case temp is 29C at
idle. I have 2 case fans plus the PSU fans.

--
Abit KT7-Raid (KT133) Tbred B core CPU @2400MHz (24x100FSB)
http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm
August 24, 2004 8:06:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

What kind of temps do you have if you leave your side doors open?

"lloydgm" <usenet.lloydgm@choicemail1.com> wrote in message
news:883a2394.0408222002.670961eb@posting.google.com...
> Hello all, I have an AMD64 FX-53 and with the stock fan I was average
> 52c. I switched to a Tt Venus 12 copper heatsink/fan and see it now
> idle around 45c.
>
> I've seen benchmarks of this same CPU with other air cooling systems
> and these guys are reaching in the 30's when idle. Is there something
> I'm doing wrong? I've made sure that all cables are tied up and that
> there is an "s" shaped air flow within the case.
>
> For the record with the case open I've gotten down into the 30's. But
> isn't it crazy to keep the case open all of the time just to maintain
> a dencent temperature?
>
> Is 45c for my setup average? What cooling systems would you
> recommend?
>
> lloydgm
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Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
August 24, 2004 10:26:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

I don't have any side doors on the case per se. I realized yesterday
that I really need a larger case, and one with a fan over the
processor to aid in getting cooler air into the case.

I'm new to overclocking and lucked into having such a nice rig as it
is. I really thought I could just slap on a copper heatsink and fan
(as opposed to the stock heatsink and fan) and achieve much cooler
temps. Oh well, it's a learning experience.

Thanks for all of your help!

"Wookie" <Tom@comcast.net> wrote in message news:<39zWc.221814$eM2.47372@attbi_s51>...
> What kind of temps do you have if you leave your side doors open?
>
> "lloydgm" <usenet.lloydgm@choicemail1.com> wrote in message
> news:883a2394.0408222002.670961eb@posting.google.com...
> > Hello all, I have an AMD64 FX-53 and with the stock fan I was average
> > 52c. I switched to a Tt Venus 12 copper heatsink/fan and see it now
> > idle around 45c.
> >
> > I've seen benchmarks of this same CPU with other air cooling systems
> > and these guys are reaching in the 30's when idle. Is there something
> > I'm doing wrong? I've made sure that all cables are tied up and that
> > there is an "s" shaped air flow within the case.
> >
> > For the record with the case open I've gotten down into the 30's. But
> > isn't it crazy to keep the case open all of the time just to maintain
> > a dencent temperature?
> >
> > Is 45c for my setup average? What cooling systems would you
> > recommend?
> >
> > lloydgm
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
August 24, 2004 11:58:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

I just thought I'd throw in a follow up. I obtained a new case. It's
much more roomy and even has a fan built into the case which sits over
top of the processor. The results? No difference. Still at 45c.
I'm bummed. I even lost my on-board sound to boot. Threw in a SB
Audigy just to get sound back.

Oh well, I'll keep trying.

usenet.lloydgm@choicemail1.com (lloydgm) wrote in message news:<883a2394.0408240526.6b748565@posting.google.com>...
> I don't have any side doors on the case per se. I realized yesterday
> that I really need a larger case, and one with a fan over the
> processor to aid in getting cooler air into the case.
>
> I'm new to overclocking and lucked into having such a nice rig as it
> is. I really thought I could just slap on a copper heatsink and fan
> (as opposed to the stock heatsink and fan) and achieve much cooler
> temps. Oh well, it's a learning experience.
>
> Thanks for all of your help!
>
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
August 25, 2004 8:51:11 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

I wonder if the thermal compound between your heat sink and cpu is
misapplied or misaligned?
If you are qualified to take the two apart and check and remove the current
compound and get some of the high quality stuff (like Arctic Silver), I
recommend doing so. Or... take to a local shop you trust and have them do
it. Should be a 15 min job.

Here are some instructions I found:

Removal Instructions (From Hardware)
1. Arctic Silver thermal compound can easily be removed from hardware
using the proper cleaners and tools. For general clean-up, a cloth or
paper towel will work well. Intricate cleaning can be accomplished
with Q-tip swabs. An old toothbrush can often get the compound out of
crevices that other tools cannot reach.
The recommended cleaners are:

CPU Core:
Use high-purity isopropyl alcohol, acetone or Akasa TIM-Clean and a
bit of careful rubbing.
Do not use nail polish remover as it contains fragrance oils and other
contaminants.
(If you use acetone, do a final cleaning with isopropyl alcohol.)

Heatsink:
Use xylene based products (Goof Off, some carburetor cleaners and many
brake cleaners.), mineral spirits or Akasa TIM-Clean.

Remember:
Once you have applied a thermal grease or melted a thermal pad onto a
heatsink, it is impossible to remove all of the grease or pad from the
microscopic valleys in the heatsink using standard cleaning chemicals
and paper or fabric towels. Any subsequent thermal material will be
applied over the remnants of the original material.

Never use any oil or petroleum based cleaners (WD-40, citrus oil
based grease removers and many automotive degreasers) on the base of a
heatsink. The oil, which is engineered to not evaporate, will fill in
the microscopic valleys in the metal and significantly reduce the
effectiveness of any subsequently applied thermal compound. (Akasa
TIM-Clean contains cirtus terpines and is designed to leave minimum
residue.)

CPU Ceramic:
Use any of the following cleaners.

Any dish detergent (Dawn, Lux, Palmolive, Etc.)
Do not use soap for an automatic dishwasher to clean a CPU.

WD-40, citrus based grease removers (Goo Gone, Etc.)

Xylene based products (Goof Off, some carburetor cleaners and many
brake cleaners.)

Akasa TIM-Clean

Mineral spirits. (Be careful to keep the mineral spirits away from
the core.)

Once the majority of the compound has been removed from the ceramic,
small patches remaining on the ceramic can be 'erased' with a soft
eraser.


2. If you use any of the suggested products to remove Arctic Silver
thermal compound from the CPU ceramic or heatsink base, always do a
final cleaning with isopropyl alcohol to remove any residue from the
cleaner.


Removal Instructions (From You)
1. Wash your hands with any dish washing detergent (Dawn, Lux,
Palmolive, Etc.) rather than hand soap.
(Do not use soap for an automatic dishwasher.)
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
August 25, 2004 12:27:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

"Scotter" <spam@spam.com> wrote in message news:<3VUWc.19157$v86.13204@fe2.texas.rr.com>...
> I wonder if the thermal compound between your heat sink and cpu is
> misapplied or misaligned?
> If you are qualified to take the two apart and check and remove the current
> compound and get some of the high quality stuff (like Arctic Silver), I
> recommend doing so. Or... take to a local shop you trust and have them do
> it. Should be a 15 min job.

With the replacement of the stock heatsink and fan I applied new
thermal compound. When I removed the new heatsink and fan last night
to pull the board out of the case I noticed that there was an ample
amount of compound on the processor and it spread evenly out to the
very edges of the CPU. It may be cheap stuff for all I know.

I'm also begining to think that the room may be a little too warm.
I'm thinking it's like 75 degrees fer. in the room due to bad air
flow. There is central air in my office, but it blows straight up and
it's next to a door. I'm going to redirect the air conditioning
towards the PC and see if that helps things at all.

Thanks for the advice!
August 26, 2004 1:34:05 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

"lloydgm" <usenet.lloydgm@choicemail1.com> wrote in message
news:883a2394.0408250727.38408686@posting.google.com...
> "Scotter" <spam@spam.com> wrote in message
news:<3VUWc.19157$v86.13204@fe2.texas.rr.com>...
> > I wonder if the thermal compound between your heat sink and cpu is
> > misapplied or misaligned?
> > If you are qualified to take the two apart and check and remove the
current
> > compound and get some of the high quality stuff (like Arctic Silver), I
> > recommend doing so. Or... take to a local shop you trust and have them
do
> > it. Should be a 15 min job.
>
> With the replacement of the stock heatsink and fan I applied new
> thermal compound. When I removed the new heatsink and fan last night
> to pull the board out of the case I noticed that there was an ample
> amount of compound on the processor and it spread evenly out to the
> very edges of the CPU. It may be cheap stuff for all I know.
>
> I'm also begining to think that the room may be a little too warm.
> I'm thinking it's like 75 degrees fer. in the room due to bad air
> flow. There is central air in my office, but it blows straight up and
> it's next to a door. I'm going to redirect the air conditioning
> towards the PC and see if that helps things at all.
>
> Thanks for the advice!

Lloyd,

You said "For the record with the case open I've gotten down into the 30's".

That tell you (and us) all you need to know. Forget replacing the heatsink.
Forget messing with thermal compound. The issue is the airflow in your
case.

I know you have changed the case. But to what? And what airflow setup does
it have? I am no expert on this myself = my case temps are nothing to write
home about. But I have noticed that tidying up the interal cabling makes a
big difference. And you need a balance of fans blowing into the case and
out.

If you have seen 30C idle temps with the case open, then you should be able
to get mid 30's with it closed... if you get the airflow sorted.

Chip
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
August 26, 2004 7:29:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

You're 100% right. That's what I realized when I went to change out
the case. The case I obtained is a freebie from a friend who had an
extra one so I admitedly did not go out and buy the most expensive
case in the world. But, It's pretty nice and definetly made for
modders and overclocking. As far as attempts at increasing airflow
and lowering temps; the case is wider, I have rounded IDE and floppy
cables, and a mounted fan build into the case which sits over the
processor bringing in outside, cooler air. Now, I believe that I can
tidy things up a bit more, and I have some extra fans I'm going to
stick into the case. I'm going for the "S" shaped air flow.

As a note of interest, I purchased a $2.00 plastic vent kit overtop of
the air register built into the floor of my office. The air from the
central air conditioning in the room is notably cooler, and I've seen
a change by a degree or two in processor temps.

I'll keep pushing for more air flow, that's definetly the problem.

Thanks Chip.

"Chip" <anneonymouse@virgin.net> wrote:
> Lloyd,
>
> You said "For the record with the case open I've gotten down into the 30's".
>
> That tell you (and us) all you need to know. Forget replacing the heatsink.
> Forget messing with thermal compound. The issue is the airflow in your
> case.
>
> I know you have changed the case. But to what? And what airflow setup does
> it have? I am no expert on this myself = my case temps are nothing to write
> home about. But I have noticed that tidying up the interal cabling makes a
> big difference. And you need a balance of fans blowing into the case and
> out.
>
> If you have seen 30C idle temps with the case open, then you should be able
> to get mid 30's with it closed... if you get the airflow sorted.
>
> Chip
August 27, 2004 8:51:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

Lloyd, the other thing you need to bear in mind is that idle temps don't
really matter at all anyway. All that matters is load temps, and as long as
they are less than around 60C (and your PC is stable) then you really have
nothing to worry about.

Its easy to get carried away with this, but at the end of the day if your PC
is running fine, then temps don't really matter.

Chip
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
August 27, 2004 10:10:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

On Fri, 27 Aug 2004 16:51:58 +0100, Chip wrote:

> Lloyd, the other thing you need to bear in mind is that idle temps don't
> really matter at all anyway. All that matters is load temps, and as long as
> they are less than around 60C (and your PC is stable) then you really have
> nothing to worry about.
>
> Its easy to get carried away with this, but at the end of the day if your PC
> is running fine, then temps don't really matter.
>
Assuming the 60C you use is an accurate reading then it's too high, no ifs
and or buts. If you have a true reading of 60C under load then you are
asking for trouble down the not to far away road. In fact when my cpu
cooler fan died, the cpu failed right around 60C. So take that system and
add a little dust to the cooler, or Loose AC in the room, and its' crashed.

--
Abit KT7-Raid (KT133) Tbred B core CPU @2400MHz (24x100FSB)
http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
August 28, 2004 9:44:10 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

Well, right now on Saturday morning, it's hot outside and the AC in
cranked. The room is around 71 degrees F, and just browsing the web
and running some background applets (virus protection, mail and SPAM
filters, etc.) I'm looking at 46c. Under load it sits around 52c -
55c.

What's really pissing me off hear is now that I have nice hardware I
want to overclock it. But any attempts at overclocking shoots me up
above 60c. I don't want to buy a water cooling kit. Mainly because I
feel my addiction has gotten out of hand. DOOM3 and the like all run
smoothly. I'm simply getting picky about temps.

Although, I must note that I've been reading about a guy who's been
using dry ice to cool his CPU and he's getting sub-zero temps. That's
just sick. :) 

Thanks all.

Wes Newell <w.newell@TAKEOUTverizon.net> wrote in message news:<pan.2004.08.27.18.10.09.493172@TAKEOUTverizon.net>...
> On Fri, 27 Aug 2004 16:51:58 +0100, Chip wrote:
>
> > Lloyd, the other thing you need to bear in mind is that idle temps don't
> > really matter at all anyway. All that matters is load temps, and as long as
> > they are less than around 60C (and your PC is stable) then you really have
> > nothing to worry about.
> >
> > Its easy to get carried away with this, but at the end of the day if your PC
> > is running fine, then temps don't really matter.
> >
> Assuming the 60C you use is an accurate reading then it's too high, no ifs
> and or buts. If you have a true reading of 60C under load then you are
> asking for trouble down the not to far away road. In fact when my cpu
> cooler fan died, the cpu failed right around 60C. So take that system and
> add a little dust to the cooler, or Loose AC in the room, and its' crashed.
August 28, 2004 7:59:44 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

Hi Lloyd,
"lloydgm" <usenet.lloydgm@choicemail1.com> wrote in message
news:883a2394.0408280444.13f4db53@posting.google.com...
> Well, right now on Saturday morning, it's hot outside and the AC in
> cranked. The room is around 71 degrees F, and just browsing the web
> and running some background applets (virus protection, mail and SPAM
> filters, etc.) I'm looking at 46c. Under load it sits around 52c -
> 55c.
>
> What's really pissing me off hear is now that I have nice hardware I
> want to overclock it. But any attempts at overclocking shoots me up
> above 60c. I don't want to buy a water cooling kit. Mainly because I
> feel my addiction has gotten out of hand. DOOM3 and the like all run
> smoothly. I'm simply getting picky about temps.
>
> Although, I must note that I've been reading about a guy who's been
> using dry ice to cool his CPU and he's getting sub-zero temps. That's
> just sick. :) 

This is slightly off topic, I'm still using x86, but running boinc[seti]
recently
the outside temp was 30C plus, inside about the same and NO a/conditioning..
CPU temps were 60C plus minus 1C.. I forked out for an elcheapo watercool
system.. cost under 50 quid incl p&p... And my temps at full load are now
46C
Not a bad system, came with all the kit for amd-x86 or amd64 or intel block
attatchment and water blocks for cpu and gpu hoses etc even antifreeze:-)
Master unit fits in a 5.25" drive bay, and has a rad&fan thats case mounted
although the master unit with the pump also has a fan.. works off 12vdc psu
supply.. Thing is an Evercool water cooler.. Dunno where you might get one
in the USA, but a look at the evercool web site might provide some help:-)

Cheers,
RD
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
August 31, 2004 3:42:21 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

RD, I've considered water cooling. I guess I see this as the insane
route. $100 or so would not be too bad a purchase. I would hope for
that much money though that I would get more than 15c difference.
But, then again, that's about what I'm looking to achieve.

CompUSA here in the states has an "el cheapo" water cooling system, I
might go with that.

Thanks for the help!

"rd" <dragon@dragon.net> wrote:
>
> This is slightly off topic, I'm still using x86, but running boinc[seti]
> recently
> the outside temp was 30C plus, inside about the same and NO a/conditioning..
> CPU temps were 60C plus minus 1C.. I forked out for an elcheapo watercool
> system.. cost under 50 quid incl p&p... And my temps at full load are now
> 46C
> Not a bad system, came with all the kit for amd-x86 or amd64 or intel block
> attatchment and water blocks for cpu and gpu hoses etc even antifreeze:-)
> Master unit fits in a 5.25" drive bay, and has a rad&fan thats case mounted
> although the master unit with the pump also has a fan.. works off 12vdc psu
> supply.. Thing is an Evercool water cooler.. Dunno where you might get one
> in the USA, but a look at the evercool web site might provide some help:-)
>
> Cheers,
> RD
!