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New (old) computer

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Anonymous
August 16, 2005 12:44:42 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

I recently aquired a another PC from some friends. It is an Emachines
T1742 and I don't believe it is very old. I haven't had the chance to hook it
up to my monitor to check it out, but I believe it was not used much. It is
slightly better than my current PC. It has a 1.7 GHz Celeron vs. my 1.0 CPU,
I believe the motherboard to be better, and the hard drive is the same size
as my own: 40 Gig. My friends took the RAM in the new computer.
I half considered replacing my CPU with the faster 1.7, but I don't think
my motherboard can handle it. I think the best course of action is to move
the hard ware from my current computer into the new one. Besides, I like the
new PC case better. ;-) This would probably include my hard drive, RAM, and
CD-RW/DVD. I'm trying to figure out the best way to do this. I'm not sure
whether to put in my hard drive and try to boot from that (I've read I'll
probably have to do a repair install) or put my hard drive in as a slave or
secondary master.
Are there usually problems when you run 2 hard drives on a computer?
Also, any thoughts about if it would increase speed to keep programs on one
hard drive and use the other primarily for windows?
I welcome any thoughts, ideas, and suggestions.

More about : computer

Anonymous
August 16, 2005 1:35:45 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Are there usually problems when you run 2 hard drives on a computer?"
There are never problems...presuming you do it right.

"[Would it] increase speed to keep programs on one hard drive and use the
other primarily for windows?"
No.

On computers that old, you would be better off to run Windows 98 rather than
XP. If you really want to use XP, you should expect slow performance. To
maximize performance, run as few programs as possible in the background, and
try to avoid programs that will tax your hardware.

--
Ted Zieglar
"You can do it if you try."

"micael911" <micael911@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:574C3689-5BB3-4A58-AC80-2ECA965C1ACA@microsoft.com...
> I recently aquired a another PC from some friends. It is an Emachines
> T1742 and I don't believe it is very old. I haven't had the chance to hook
it
> up to my monitor to check it out, but I believe it was not used much. It
is
> slightly better than my current PC. It has a 1.7 GHz Celeron vs. my 1.0
CPU,
> I believe the motherboard to be better, and the hard drive is the same
size
> as my own: 40 Gig. My friends took the RAM in the new computer.
> I half considered replacing my CPU with the faster 1.7, but I don't
think
> my motherboard can handle it. I think the best course of action is to move
> the hard ware from my current computer into the new one. Besides, I like
the
> new PC case better. ;-) This would probably include my hard drive, RAM,
and
> CD-RW/DVD. I'm trying to figure out the best way to do this. I'm not sure
> whether to put in my hard drive and try to boot from that (I've read I'll
> probably have to do a repair install) or put my hard drive in as a slave
or
> secondary master.
> Are there usually problems when you run 2 hard drives on a computer?
> Also, any thoughts about if it would increase speed to keep programs on
one
> hard drive and use the other primarily for windows?
> I welcome any thoughts, ideas, and suggestions.
>
>
Anonymous
August 16, 2005 4:37:52 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Micael

Fit memory into the new computer.. fit the hard drive from your old computer
into the new (disconnect the incumbent drive until you have your drive up
and running)

Do a repair install on your drive.. for details on the procedure, go to..

http://www.michaelstevenstech.com

Good luck..

--
Mike Hall
MVP - Windows Shell/User


"micael911" <micael911@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:574C3689-5BB3-4A58-AC80-2ECA965C1ACA@microsoft.com...
> I recently aquired a another PC from some friends. It is an Emachines
> T1742 and I don't believe it is very old. I haven't had the chance to hook
> it
> up to my monitor to check it out, but I believe it was not used much. It
> is
> slightly better than my current PC. It has a 1.7 GHz Celeron vs. my 1.0
> CPU,
> I believe the motherboard to be better, and the hard drive is the same
> size
> as my own: 40 Gig. My friends took the RAM in the new computer.
> I half considered replacing my CPU with the faster 1.7, but I don't
> think
> my motherboard can handle it. I think the best course of action is to move
> the hard ware from my current computer into the new one. Besides, I like
> the
> new PC case better. ;-) This would probably include my hard drive, RAM,
> and
> CD-RW/DVD. I'm trying to figure out the best way to do this. I'm not sure
> whether to put in my hard drive and try to boot from that (I've read I'll
> probably have to do a repair install) or put my hard drive in as a slave
> or
> secondary master.
> Are there usually problems when you run 2 hard drives on a computer?
> Also, any thoughts about if it would increase speed to keep programs on
> one
> hard drive and use the other primarily for windows?
> I welcome any thoughts, ideas, and suggestions.
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
August 16, 2005 6:37:50 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote:


>On computers that old, you would be better off to run Windows 98 rather than
>XP. If you really want to use XP, you should expect slow performance. To
>maximize performance, run as few programs as possible in the background, and
>try to avoid programs that will tax your hardware.

A 1.7 ghz Celeron is not that old. At least it better not be - that
is what I am running. :-)

Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
--
Microsoft MVP
On-Line Help Computer Service
http://onlinehelp.bc.ca

In memory of a dear friend Alex Nichol MVP
http://aumha.org/alex.htm
Anonymous
August 16, 2005 6:46:13 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Mike Hall \(MS-MVP\)" <mike.hall.mail@sympatico.ca> wrote:

>Micael
>
>Fit memory into the new computer.. fit the hard drive from your old computer
>into the new (disconnect the incumbent drive until you have your drive up
>and running)
>
>Do a repair install on your drive.. for details on the procedure, go to..
>
>http://www.michaelstevenstech.com
>
>Good luck..


One caveat regarding the above. You need to check out your Windows XP
version first, specifically to see of it is a "BIOS Locked" OEM
version.

If your existing computer is also by eMachines then there is not
likely to be an issue. Otherwise open Control Panel - System -
General and look at the 20 character Product I.D. Code shown on the
last line of the "Licensed to" section. If the second segment of the
Product I.D. reads OEM then you have an OEM version.

Note that the Produc I.D. is 20 characters and is not the same as the
25 character Product Key used to install Windows XP.

If your old computer has an OEM version of Windows XP then you can
check to see if it is a "BIOS Locked" OEM version by using Start - All
Programs - Accessories - System Tools and looking for an "Activate
Windows" entry on the menu. If there is no "Activate Windows" entry
in the System Tools section then your OEM verison of Windows XP is
BIOS Locked and you will not be able to activate that version on a
motherboard that is not from the same manufacturer/assembler that
provided the original computer.

If there is an "Activate Windows" entry on the System Tools menu then
your OEM version of Windows XP is not BIOS Locked *unless* you had
previously replaced the motherboard with a different brand prior to 1
March 2005.

Good luck

Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
--
Microsoft MVP
On-Line Help Computer Service
http://onlinehelp.bc.ca

In memory of a dear friend Alex Nichol MVP
http://aumha.org/alex.htm
Anonymous
August 17, 2005 1:45:20 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

"Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in
news:o #b8NdmoFHA.2472@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl:

> On computers that old, you would be better off to run Windows 98
> rather than XP. If you really want to use XP, you should expect
> slow performance. To maximize performance, run as few programs
> as possible in the background, and try to avoid programs that
> will tax your hardware.
>

Nonsense.
Anonymous
August 17, 2005 1:44:26 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

It's not only about the processor. Most computers that came with a 1.7GHz
Celeron likely have hardware of the same vintage. The fact that you are
running it doesn't mean that it's not old. I use a transistor radio on
occasion. The fact that you are running it to your satisfaction is a credit
to you.

--
Ted Zieglar
"You can do it if you try."

"Ron Martell" <ron.martell@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:b3n4g1h6s30kdg3avdrrm4pjbtevcfk3b2@4ax.com...
> "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote:
>
>
> >On computers that old, you would be better off to run Windows 98 rather
than
> >XP. If you really want to use XP, you should expect slow performance. To
> >maximize performance, run as few programs as possible in the background,
and
> >try to avoid programs that will tax your hardware.
>
> A 1.7 ghz Celeron is not that old. At least it better not be - that
> is what I am running. :-)
>
> Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
> --
> Microsoft MVP
> On-Line Help Computer Service
> http://onlinehelp.bc.ca
>
> In memory of a dear friend Alex Nichol MVP
> http://aumha.org/alex.htm
!