Self Built Desktop PC

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

Just about to emabark on a new project to build my own PC. I have identified the following items that I migh need to have a first working model:

1) CASE
2) Processor
3) Heatsink & Fan
4) Momory module
5) Motherboard
6) Hard disk
7) CD/DVD
8) Floppy drive
9) USB card
10) Sound card


Is there anything else I need to put on this list? The idea is to build and upgrade it as and when new brain waves reaches me. Alternatively, are there any sites where there is a checklist for a modest PC?

Regards,
14 answers Last reply
More about self built desktop
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Couple of things...

    1) Most cases come with power supplies.

    2) Most motherboards come with onboard sound & USB.

    3) All retail CPUs come with heatsink and fan.

    All you really need is a Case, CPU, Memory, Hard Drive, CD-ROM, and Floppy.

    Matt Gibson - GSEC
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    John Stokdyk wrote:
    >
    > Just about to emabark on a new project to build my own PC. I have identified the following items that I migh need to have a first working model:
    >
    > 1) CASE
    > 2) Processor
    > 3) Heatsink & Fan
    > 4) Momory module
    > 5) Motherboard
    > 6) Hard disk
    > 7) CD/DVD
    > 8) Floppy drive
    > 9) USB card
    > 10) Sound card
    >
    >
    > Is there anything else I need to put on this list? The idea is to build and upgrade it as and when new brain waves reaches me. Alternatively, are there any sites where there is a checklist for a modest PC?
    >
    > Regards,
    >
    >
    >
    Unless your case comes with a good power supply you will need one.
    Also, unless the motherboard you choose has built-in video you will also
    need a video card. Most new motherboards include USB ports, sound, and
    LAN connections so you will not need the USB or sound card.
    You might also want to look into additional fans for the case unless it
    already has them. A lot of cases have spots for attaching the fans but
    do not include them.
    The best bet is to decide on the processor you want to use, then find a
    motherboard that will work with that processor. From there you will
    know what kind of memory to get and any additional cards you will need.
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    John Stokdyk <john.stokdyk@btopenworld.com> wrote in
    news:73EC1BBB.102B7CB3@btopenworld.com:

    ....

    > 6) Hard disks
    - main disk
    - backup disk
    ....

    > 9) USB card
    [probably integrated in motherboard]

    > 10) Sound card
    [probably integrated in motherboard, unless you want home
    cinema/hifi capabilities]

    11) LAN Networking
    [probably integrated in motherboard]

    12) Firewire interface
    [probably integrated in motherboard]

    13) Software
    Windows XP ?
    Office ?
    etc ?
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Matt Gibson, GSEC wrote:

    > Couple of things...
    >
    > 1) Most cases come with power supplies.
    >
    > 2) Most motherboards come with onboard sound & USB.
    >
    > 3) All retail CPUs come with heatsink and fan.
    >
    > All you really need is a Case, CPU, Memory, Hard Drive, CD-ROM, and Floppy.

    Where are you going to put the CPU if you don't have a motherboard?
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    You will need to add:

    1) A video card -- Integrated video cards (on the motherboard) do not
    provide a "good" 3D version. They also share memory (RAM)
    2) Use 512 -- 2GB of RAM -- Two modules give you some room, in case one
    fails.
    3) Power Supply -- any power supplies below 400 watts are to be avoided.
    400 watt PS will give you room to expand.
    4) A Network adapter -- will allo to to set up a home network (later) and
    connect to broadband (DSL, cable) internet
    --- If you do get this -- look at getting a broadband router
    5) Regular 56K modem -- you may want to fax out -- broadband modem units do
    not have fax capabilities.
    5) Surge protector or UPS -- 95% of most PC problem occur on bad power
    circuits.


    "John Stokdyk" <john.stokdyk@btopenworld.com> wrote in message
    news:73EC1BBB.102B7CB3@btopenworld.com...
    >
    >
    > Just about to emabark on a new project to build my own PC. I have
    > identified the following items that I migh need to have a first working
    > model:
    >
    > 1) CASE
    > 2) Processor
    > 3) Heatsink & Fan
    > 4) Momory module
    > 5) Motherboard
    > 6) Hard disk
    > 7) CD/DVD
    > 8) Floppy drive
    > 9) USB card
    > 10) Sound card
    >
    >
    > Is there anything else I need to put on this list? The idea is to build
    > and upgrade it as and when new brain waves reaches me. Alternatively, are
    > there any sites where there is a checklist for a modest PC?
    >
    > Regards,
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    *grin*

    Uh...I was going to suggest he build his own ;-)

    Thanks for the catch!

    Matt Gibson - GSEC
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    "95% of most PC problem occur on bad power circuits" when the
    human does not first learn why failure occurs. For example, a
    computer grade UPS in battery backup mode outputs a modified
    120 volt sine wave. Now we review the numbers. That 'sine
    wave' could be two 200 volt square waves with up to a 270 volt
    spike between those square waves. IOW the 'dirtiest power' is
    delivered by the UPS. Is that UPS destructive to computers?
    Of course not.

    Computer must have a power supply that provides protection
    from 'dirty power'. But when selling a power supply at
    significantly less than $65, essential functions are
    forgotten. Functions that make dirty power irrelevant.
    Functions that are essential to a reliable computer.
    Functions as even required in Intel specs.

    How to identify inferior power supplies. One - they sell at
    lower prices. This (obviously) does not say all $70 supplies
    include essential functions. But a $40 power supply would be
    missing these essential functions.

    Two- supply manufacturer forgets to provides a long list of
    numerical specs. Essential to forgetting to include those
    essential functions: don't provide those specs. Then those
    with real technical knowledge cannot 'blow the whistle'. A
    long list of numerical specs means the manufacturer has stated
    those essential functions are included. Ten lines of
    specifications only means the manufacturer is insulting your
    intelligence. No numbers means he never really intended to
    provide a minimally acceptable supply.

    Forget the UPS or plug-in surge protector that doesn't even
    claim to provide protection from typically destructive
    transients. Any protection that works at the computer would
    already be inside the power supply. Protection that can be
    overwhelmed if the building does not have a 'whole house
    protector on AC mains and other service entrance protection.
    Essential is the building's earthing that meets or exceeds
    post 1990 NEC requirements. Just more facts that useless,
    undersized, and grossly overpriced plug-in protector
    manufacturers hope you never learn.

    Instead get a minimally acceptable power supply. Consider
    effect transient protection at the utility service entrances.
    Don't fall for the myths promoted by the electrically naive
    who assume "surge protector = surge protection". Protector
    and protection are not even the same items. But a good power
    supply contains essential functions even demanded by Intel.

    Yves Leclerc wrote:
    > You will need to add:
    > ...
    > 3) Power Supply -- any power supplies below 400 watts are to be avoided.
    > 400 watt PS will give you room to expand.
    > ...
    > 5) Surge protector or UPS -- 95% of most PC problem occur on bad
    > power circuits.
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Head over to American Power Conversion or Powerware. These are two large
    UPS makers and will give getter 'facts' on why to use UPS or surge
    protectors.


    "w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:4305F9D9.73365FA9@hotmail.com...
    > "95% of most PC problem occur on bad power circuits" when the
    > human does not first learn why failure occurs. For example, a
    > computer grade UPS in battery backup mode outputs a modified
    > 120 volt sine wave. Now we review the numbers. That 'sine
    > wave' could be two 200 volt square waves with up to a 270 volt
    > spike between those square waves. IOW the 'dirtiest power' is
    > delivered by the UPS. Is that UPS destructive to computers?
    > Of course not.
    >
    > Computer must have a power supply that provides protection
    > from 'dirty power'. But when selling a power supply at
    > significantly less than $65, essential functions are
    > forgotten. Functions that make dirty power irrelevant.
    > Functions that are essential to a reliable computer.
    > Functions as even required in Intel specs.
    >
    > How to identify inferior power supplies. One - they sell at
    > lower prices. This (obviously) does not say all $70 supplies
    > include essential functions. But a $40 power supply would be
    > missing these essential functions.
    >
    > Two- supply manufacturer forgets to provides a long list of
    > numerical specs. Essential to forgetting to include those
    > essential functions: don't provide those specs. Then those
    > with real technical knowledge cannot 'blow the whistle'. A
    > long list of numerical specs means the manufacturer has stated
    > those essential functions are included. Ten lines of
    > specifications only means the manufacturer is insulting your
    > intelligence. No numbers means he never really intended to
    > provide a minimally acceptable supply.
    >
    > Forget the UPS or plug-in surge protector that doesn't even
    > claim to provide protection from typically destructive
    > transients. Any protection that works at the computer would
    > already be inside the power supply. Protection that can be
    > overwhelmed if the building does not have a 'whole house
    > protector on AC mains and other service entrance protection.
    > Essential is the building's earthing that meets or exceeds
    > post 1990 NEC requirements. Just more facts that useless,
    > undersized, and grossly overpriced plug-in protector
    > manufacturers hope you never learn.
    >
    > Instead get a minimally acceptable power supply. Consider
    > effect transient protection at the utility service entrances.
    > Don't fall for the myths promoted by the electrically naive
    > who assume "surge protector = surge protection". Protector
    > and protection are not even the same items. But a good power
    > supply contains essential functions even demanded by Intel.
    >
    > Yves Leclerc wrote:
    >> You will need to add:
    >> ...
    >> 3) Power Supply -- any power supplies below 400 watts are to be avoided.
    >> 400 watt PS will give you room to expand.
    >> ...
    >> 5) Surge protector or UPS -- 95% of most PC problem occur on bad
    >> power circuits.
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    Yves Leclerc wrote:
    > Head over to American Power Conversion or Powerware. These are two large
    > UPS makers and will give getter 'facts' on why to use UPS or surge
    > protectors.

    Been there. Where do they define how the protector works for each
    type of surge? They don't. Why? They only claim protection from a
    type of surge - the one that typically does not exist. There is one
    well proven fact even in 1930s GE and Westinghouse science papers: the
    protector is only as effective as its earth ground. What does APC, et
    al forget to mention? Earthing.

    Effective protector are manufactured by companies with responsible
    reputations such as Square D, Leviton, Intermatic, GE, Siemens,
    Polyphaser, and Cutler Hammer. Ineffective protectors are hyped by
    'lying by telling half truths'.

    For example, how to identify ineffective protectors - plug-in or UPS.
    1) Protector has no dedicated connection to the most critical
    component in any protector 'system': earth ground. 2) Manufacturer
    avoids all mention of earthing. No earth ground means no effective
    protection. So APC, et al forget to mention they don't even claim to
    protect from the type of surge that typically damages electronics.

    Again, any protection that works at the electronics is already inside
    those electronics. Protection that must not be overwhelmed. IOW we
    install a single effective 'whole house' protector on each incoming
    utility so that protection inside ALL electronics is not overwhelmed.
    That includes GFCI in bathroom and kitchen, smoke detectors,
    dishwasher, clock radio, and the furnace controls. These are
    electronics that also contain internal protection. Internal protection
    that must not be overwhelmed. Electronics that also cannot be
    protected by ineffective plug-in protectors.

    What does APC, et al avoid discussing? Earth ground. No earth
    ground means no effective protection. A surge protector is only as
    effective as its earth ground - as Ben Franklin even demonstrated in
    1752.
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    w_tom,

    Why go into all that detail for an obvious novice computer user?

    John: Just remember to get at least 450W Antec power supply.

    "w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:4305F9D9.73365FA9@hotmail.com...
    > "95% of most PC problem occur on bad power circuits" when the
    > human does not first learn why failure occurs. For example, a
    > computer grade UPS in battery backup mode outputs a modified
    > 120 volt sine wave. Now we review the numbers. That 'sine
    > wave' could be two 200 volt square waves with up to a 270 volt
    > spike between those square waves. IOW the 'dirtiest power' is
    > delivered by the UPS. Is that UPS destructive to computers?
    > Of course not.
    >
    > Computer must have a power supply that provides protection
    > from 'dirty power'. But when selling a power supply at
    > significantly less than $65, essential functions are
    > forgotten. Functions that make dirty power irrelevant.
    > Functions that are essential to a reliable computer.
    > Functions as even required in Intel specs.
    >
    > How to identify inferior power supplies. One - they sell at
    > lower prices. This (obviously) does not say all $70 supplies
    > include essential functions. But a $40 power supply would be
    > missing these essential functions.
    >
    > Two- supply manufacturer forgets to provides a long list of
    > numerical specs. Essential to forgetting to include those
    > essential functions: don't provide those specs. Then those
    > with real technical knowledge cannot 'blow the whistle'. A
    > long list of numerical specs means the manufacturer has stated
    > those essential functions are included. Ten lines of
    > specifications only means the manufacturer is insulting your
    > intelligence. No numbers means he never really intended to
    > provide a minimally acceptable supply.
    >
    > Forget the UPS or plug-in surge protector that doesn't even
    > claim to provide protection from typically destructive
    > transients. Any protection that works at the computer would
    > already be inside the power supply. Protection that can be
    > overwhelmed if the building does not have a 'whole house
    > protector on AC mains and other service entrance protection.
    > Essential is the building's earthing that meets or exceeds
    > post 1990 NEC requirements. Just more facts that useless,
    > undersized, and grossly overpriced plug-in protector
    > manufacturers hope you never learn.
    >
    > Instead get a minimally acceptable power supply. Consider
    > effect transient protection at the utility service entrances.
    > Don't fall for the myths promoted by the electrically naive
    > who assume "surge protector = surge protection". Protector
    > and protection are not even the same items. But a good power
    > supply contains essential functions even demanded by Intel.
    >
    > Yves Leclerc wrote:
    >> You will need to add:
    >> ...
    >> 3) Power Supply -- any power supplies below 400 watts are to be avoided.
    >> 400 watt PS will give you room to expand.
    >> ...
    >> 5) Surge protector or UPS -- 95% of most PC problem occur on bad
    >> power circuits.
  11. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    He is building a home computer. I don't think he is going to be using it to
    control a dialysis machine to keep his spouse alive.

    Tom, you go way too far overboard for Mr. Average user! He just wants to
    build a decent computer for gods sake. Any decent name brand power supply in
    the mid to upper price range will likely do him just fine. There are
    hundreds of millions of such power supplies in use this very minute.

    --
    Regards,

    Richard Urban
    Microsoft MVP Windows Shell/User

    Quote from: George Ankner
    "If you knew as much as you thought you know,
    You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!"

    "w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:4305F9D9.73365FA9@hotmail.com...
    > "95% of most PC problem occur on bad power circuits" when the
    > human does not first learn why failure occurs. For example, a
    > computer grade UPS in battery backup mode outputs a modified
    > 120 volt sine wave. Now we review the numbers. That 'sine
    > wave' could be two 200 volt square waves with up to a 270 volt
    > spike between those square waves. IOW the 'dirtiest power' is
    > delivered by the UPS. Is that UPS destructive to computers?
    > Of course not.
    >
    > Computer must have a power supply that provides protection
    > from 'dirty power'. But when selling a power supply at
    > significantly less than $65, essential functions are
    > forgotten. Functions that make dirty power irrelevant.
    > Functions that are essential to a reliable computer.
    > Functions as even required in Intel specs.
    >
    > How to identify inferior power supplies. One - they sell at
    > lower prices. This (obviously) does not say all $70 supplies
    > include essential functions. But a $40 power supply would be
    > missing these essential functions.
    >
    > Two- supply manufacturer forgets to provides a long list of
    > numerical specs. Essential to forgetting to include those
    > essential functions: don't provide those specs. Then those
    > with real technical knowledge cannot 'blow the whistle'. A
    > long list of numerical specs means the manufacturer has stated
    > those essential functions are included. Ten lines of
    > specifications only means the manufacturer is insulting your
    > intelligence. No numbers means he never really intended to
    > provide a minimally acceptable supply.
    >
    > Forget the UPS or plug-in surge protector that doesn't even
    > claim to provide protection from typically destructive
    > transients. Any protection that works at the computer would
    > already be inside the power supply. Protection that can be
    > overwhelmed if the building does not have a 'whole house
    > protector on AC mains and other service entrance protection.
    > Essential is the building's earthing that meets or exceeds
    > post 1990 NEC requirements. Just more facts that useless,
    > undersized, and grossly overpriced plug-in protector
    > manufacturers hope you never learn.
    >
    > Instead get a minimally acceptable power supply. Consider
    > effect transient protection at the utility service entrances.
    > Don't fall for the myths promoted by the electrically naive
    > who assume "surge protector = surge protection". Protector
    > and protection are not even the same items. But a good power
    > supply contains essential functions even demanded by Intel.
    >
    > Yves Leclerc wrote:
    >> You will need to add:
    >> ...
    >> 3) Power Supply -- any power supplies below 400 watts are to be avoided.
    >> 400 watt PS will give you room to expand.
    >> ...
    >> 5) Surge protector or UPS -- 95% of most PC problem occur on bad
    >> power circuits.
  12. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    I completely agree with Richard.

    "Richard Urban [MVP]" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:u$asHlbpFHA.272@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    > He is building a home computer. I don't think he is going to be using it
    > to control a dialysis machine to keep his spouse alive.
    >
    > Tom, you go way too far overboard for Mr. Average user! He just wants to
    > build a decent computer for gods sake. Any decent name brand power supply
    > in the mid to upper price range will likely do him just fine. There are
    > hundreds of millions of such power supplies in use this very minute.
    >
    > --
    > Regards,
    >
    > Richard Urban
    > Microsoft MVP Windows Shell/User
    >
    > Quote from: George Ankner
    > "If you knew as much as you thought you know,
    > You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!"
    >
    > "w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:4305F9D9.73365FA9@hotmail.com...
    >> "95% of most PC problem occur on bad power circuits" when the
    >> human does not first learn why failure occurs. For example, a
    >> computer grade UPS in battery backup mode outputs a modified
    >> 120 volt sine wave. Now we review the numbers. That 'sine
    >> wave' could be two 200 volt square waves with up to a 270 volt
    >> spike between those square waves. IOW the 'dirtiest power' is
    >> delivered by the UPS. Is that UPS destructive to computers?
    >> Of course not.
    >>
    >> Computer must have a power supply that provides protection
    >> from 'dirty power'. But when selling a power supply at
    >> significantly less than $65, essential functions are
    >> forgotten. Functions that make dirty power irrelevant.
    >> Functions that are essential to a reliable computer.
    >> Functions as even required in Intel specs.
    >>
    >> How to identify inferior power supplies. One - they sell at
    >> lower prices. This (obviously) does not say all $70 supplies
    >> include essential functions. But a $40 power supply would be
    >> missing these essential functions.
    >>
    >> Two- supply manufacturer forgets to provides a long list of
    >> numerical specs. Essential to forgetting to include those
    >> essential functions: don't provide those specs. Then those
    >> with real technical knowledge cannot 'blow the whistle'. A
    >> long list of numerical specs means the manufacturer has stated
    >> those essential functions are included. Ten lines of
    >> specifications only means the manufacturer is insulting your
    >> intelligence. No numbers means he never really intended to
    >> provide a minimally acceptable supply.
    >>
    >> Forget the UPS or plug-in surge protector that doesn't even
    >> claim to provide protection from typically destructive
    >> transients. Any protection that works at the computer would
    >> already be inside the power supply. Protection that can be
    >> overwhelmed if the building does not have a 'whole house
    >> protector on AC mains and other service entrance protection.
    >> Essential is the building's earthing that meets or exceeds
    >> post 1990 NEC requirements. Just more facts that useless,
    >> undersized, and grossly overpriced plug-in protector
    >> manufacturers hope you never learn.
    >>
    >> Instead get a minimally acceptable power supply. Consider
    >> effect transient protection at the utility service entrances.
    >> Don't fall for the myths promoted by the electrically naive
    >> who assume "surge protector = surge protection". Protector
    >> and protection are not even the same items. But a good power
    >> supply contains essential functions even demanded by Intel.
    >>
    >> Yves Leclerc wrote:
    >>> You will need to add:
    >>> ...
    >>> 3) Power Supply -- any power supplies below 400 watts are to be
    >>> avoided.
    >>> 400 watt PS will give you room to expand.
    >>> ...
    >>> 5) Surge protector or UPS -- 95% of most PC problem occur on bad
    >>> power circuits.
    >
    >
  13. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    My problem is similar to John's in that I have built a new dual core PC with 500 GB HD (2 X 250) and 1024 MB RAM (2 X 512) and now I need to install all the drivers etc. Is there any particular order of installing drivers to avoid any problems?

    The order I am thinking of is:

    !) Operating system and all updates
    2) Motherboard drivers
    3) Graphics/display card drivers,
    4) Modem drivers
    5) USB etc drivers
    6) Antivirus software - Free Grisoft and updates
    7) AntiSpyware software - Free Webroot and updates
    8) Office Professional and all updates
    9) updates for drivers etc

    Any constructive comments would be very much appreciated.

    Regards,

    Mahesh


    John Stokdyk wrote:
    >
    > Just about to emabark on a new project to build my own PC. I have identified the following items that I migh need to have a first working model:
    >
    > 1) CASE
    > 2) Processor
    > 3) Heatsink & Fan
    > 4) Momory module
    > 5) Motherboard
    > 6) Hard disk
    > 7) CD/DVD
    > 8) Floppy drive
    > 9) USB card
    > 10) Sound card
    >
    > Is there anything else I need to put on this list? The idea is to build and upgrade it as and when new brain waves reaches me. Alternatively, are there any sites where there is a checklist for a modest PC?
    >
    > Regards,
  14. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware (More info?)

    In article <74079D79.7B578C31@123456.com>, Mahesh.Patel@123456.com
    says...
    > My problem is similar to John's in that I have built a new dual core PC with 500 GB HD (2 X 250) and 1024 MB RAM (2 X 512) and now I need to install all the drivers etc. Is there any particular order of installing drivers to avoid any problems?
    >
    > The order I am thinking of is:
    >
    > !) Operating system and all updates
    > 2) Motherboard drivers
    > 3) Graphics/display card drivers,
    > 4) Modem drivers
    > 5) USB etc drivers
    > 6) Antivirus software - Free Grisoft and updates
    > 7) AntiSpyware software - Free Webroot and updates
    > 8) Office Professional and all updates
    > 9) updates for drivers etc
    >
    > Any constructive comments would be very much appreciated.

    Yes, get a NAT router between your computer and the internet before you
    start loading drivers/updates or you risk being compromised while
    building the system.

    I usually install the OS and specific IDE/SATA drivers if needed, then
    the drivers that came with the motherboard (INTEL and such)....

    I would do #9 between #5 & #6
    10) Run windows update one more time.

    --

    spam999free@rrohio.com
    remove 999 in order to email me
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