Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

How to identify a Barton 3000+?

Last response: in Overclocking
Share
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
September 21, 2004 9:02:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

Hello, all:

Got a question. How do I identify a 3000+ Barton? Going to purchase
one soon, and I would like to know what it looks like, or the relevant
codes on the chip. I've been Googling for a while, and haven't had
much luck.

Thanks,

Bob M.

More about : identify barton 3000

September 22, 2004 3:58:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

<removespamandslimermilnespam@slimemagma.ca> wrote in message
news:g251l0du0lq1aqn711f4b255do0p3acvbd@4ax.com...
> Hello, all:
>
> Got a question. How do I identify a 3000+ Barton? Going to purchase
> one soon, and I would like to know what it looks like, or the relevant
> codes on the chip. I've been Googling for a while, and haven't had
> much luck.

Any Barton 3000+ will look similar to this. Which I got in 2 secs by doing
an image search in google with "amd barton 3000+" as the parameters.
Related resources
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
September 22, 2004 9:33:35 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

Augustus wrote:
> <removespamandslimermilnespam@slimemagma.ca> wrote in message
> news:g251l0du0lq1aqn711f4b255do0p3acvbd@4ax.com...
>> Hello, all:
>>
>> Got a question. How do I identify a 3000+ Barton? Going to purchase
>> one soon, and I would like to know what it looks like, or the
>> relevant codes on the chip. I've been Googling for a while, and
>> haven't had much luck.
>
> Any Barton 3000+ will look similar to this. Which I got in 2 secs by
> doing an image search in google with "amd barton 3000+" as the
> parameters.

Actually, probably not :)  It'll look much closer to
http://www.ocprices.com/ben/newamd/2400.jpg
except the die will be slightly longer and thinner (see the die in Augugtus'
post for reference). As far as what's on the little black label, you should
see either
AXDA3000DKV4E (200MHz FSB, runs at 2100MHz)
or
AXDA3000DKV4D (166MHz FSB, runs at 2167MHz)
Which one is better for you depends on what motherboard and RAM you have
(and of course the relative prices you can get them for :)  ).


The next line will look like AQXFA0335RPMW or similar. This is broken down
like so:
[] AQXFA = stepping. This doesn't matter quite so much as the ...
[] 0335 = year/week, week 35 of 2003 in this case. The more recent the
better pretty much.
[] RPMW = date code. Not really important at all.

For what it's worth, some people at Hexus.net think the order of steppings
is roughly:
AIUAA < AQUCA < AQXCA < AQXDA < AQXEA < AQZEA < AQXFA < AQFZA < AQYFA <
AQYHA < AQZFA
http://forums.hexus.net/archive/index.php/t-26161

For the date code (which strictly includes the year/week part as well), it's
decoded as
{day}{assembly plant}{batch}{combining prohibited}
[] Day: R, S, T, U, V, W, X = Mon, Tue, Wed, etc etc. M = mixed from
multiple days.
[] Assembly plant: always seems to be "P"
[] Batch: A = first of the day, B = second of the day, etc etc. M = mixed
from multipler batches.
[] Wombining prohibited: To quote AMD: "On rare occasions, a W may be added
to the date code to designate that combining wafer lots is prohibited.".
Pretty much every (but certainly not all) Athlons have a W at the end.

Unless you take the view that the machines slack off on a Friday afternoon,
this doesn't really help you that much :) 


Finally, there's the third line which looks something like Y868817270142. I
don't think anyone knows much at all about this line, except that it
probably indicates which wafer it came from and where in the wafer this
particular CPU was. Some people say that having the last 4 digits
(supposedly the die number on the wafer, which is possible given the usually
low number that is in here) as low as possible is good, but I don't think
there's a lot of evidence to back that up. Pretty much it just serves as a
unique identifier of the chip.

--
Michael Brown
www.emboss.co.nz : OOS/RSI software and more :) 
Add michael@ to emboss.co.nz - My inbox is always open
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
September 22, 2004 9:33:36 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

On Wed, 22 Sep 2004 17:33:35 +1200, "Michael Brown"
<see@signature.below> wrote:

>Augustus wrote:
>> <removespamandslimermilnespam@slimemagma.ca> wrote in message
>> news:g251l0du0lq1aqn711f4b255do0p3acvbd@4ax.com...
>>> Hello, all:
>>>
>>> Got a question. How do I identify a 3000+ Barton? Going to purchase
>>> one soon, and I would like to know what it looks like, or the
>>> relevant codes on the chip. I've been Googling for a while, and
>>> haven't had much luck.
>>
>> Any Barton 3000+ will look similar to this. Which I got in 2 secs by
>> doing an image search in google with "amd barton 3000+" as the
>> parameters.
>
>Actually, probably not :)  It'll look much closer to
>http://www.ocprices.com/ben/newamd/2400.jpg
>except the die will be slightly longer and thinner (see the die in Augugtus'
>post for reference). As far as what's on the little black label, you should
>see either
>AXDA3000DKV4E (200MHz FSB, runs at 2100MHz)
>or
>AXDA3000DKV4D (166MHz FSB, runs at 2167MHz)
>Which one is better for you depends on what motherboard and RAM you have
>(and of course the relative prices you can get them for :)  ).
>
>
>The next line will look like AQXFA0335RPMW or similar. This is broken down
>like so:
>[] AQXFA = stepping. This doesn't matter quite so much as the ...
>[] 0335 = year/week, week 35 of 2003 in this case. The more recent the
>better pretty much.
>[] RPMW = date code. Not really important at all.
>
>For what it's worth, some people at Hexus.net think the order of steppings
>is roughly:
>AIUAA < AQUCA < AQXCA < AQXDA < AQXEA < AQZEA < AQXFA < AQFZA < AQYFA <
>AQYHA < AQZFA
>http://forums.hexus.net/archive/index.php/t-26161
>
>For the date code (which strictly includes the year/week part as well), it's
>decoded as
>{day}{assembly plant}{batch}{combining prohibited}
>[] Day: R, S, T, U, V, W, X = Mon, Tue, Wed, etc etc. M = mixed from
>multiple days.
>[] Assembly plant: always seems to be "P"
>[] Batch: A = first of the day, B = second of the day, etc etc. M = mixed
>from multipler batches.
>[] Wombining prohibited: To quote AMD: "On rare occasions, a W may be added
>to the date code to designate that combining wafer lots is prohibited.".
>Pretty much every (but certainly not all) Athlons have a W at the end.
>
>Unless you take the view that the machines slack off on a Friday afternoon,
>this doesn't really help you that much :) 
>
>
>Finally, there's the third line which looks something like Y868817270142. I
>don't think anyone knows much at all about this line, except that it
>probably indicates which wafer it came from and where in the wafer this
>particular CPU was. Some people say that having the last 4 digits
>(supposedly the die number on the wafer, which is possible given the usually
>low number that is in here) as low as possible is good, but I don't think
>there's a lot of evidence to back that up. Pretty much it just serves as a
>unique identifier of the chip.

Thanks! I really needed the codes info, actually, to avoid getting
hornswoggled.

Regards,

Bob M.
!