What PSU rating for Athlon 2400 with 6 HDDs?

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

What rating PSU should I use on a system which has an Athlon 2400+
with a modest graphics card (old GeForce2 MX 32MB) and 768 MB of SD-
RAM. Unusually, it will have *SIX* IDE internal hard drives.

All the rest of the system is pretty normal with no overclocking on
the cpu.

Would a decent 350W PSU be enough? I am thinking of this Nexus PSU.
http://www.nexustek.nl/nx3500.htm The specification chart shows
current delivery at min load, normal load, max load:

+3.3V 0.3A 14.0A 21.2/28A
+5V 1.0A 12.7A 30/25.5A
+12V 0.2A 4.5A 16A

(1) +3.3V & +5V total output not exceed 220Watt.
(1a) When +3.3V is loaded to 28A, then the +5V maximum load is 25.5A.
(1b) When +3.3V is loaded to 21.2A, the +5V maximum load is 30A.
(2) +3.3V & +5V & +12V total output not exceed 330Watt.

---

Is this any good for my needs?
87 answers Last reply
More about what rating athlon 2400 hdds
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Franklin" <no_thanks@mail.com> wrote in message
    news:958099B49C7BC71F3M4@130.133.1.4...
    > What rating PSU should I use on a system which has an Athlon 2400+
    > with a modest graphics card (old GeForce2 MX 32MB) and 768 MB of SD-
    > RAM. Unusually, it will have *SIX* IDE internal hard drives.
    >
    > All the rest of the system is pretty normal with no overclocking on
    > the cpu.
    >
    > Would a decent 350W PSU be enough? I am thinking of this Nexus PSU.
    > http://www.nexustek.nl/nx3500.htm The specification chart shows
    > current delivery at min load, normal load, max load:

    I can't comment on the power requirements, but I can say the power supply I
    have is excellent. Its the Nexus NX 3000 (300W)and it really is quiet! If I
    stop the other 2 fans in the system, I can only just hear it in a quiet
    room! This power supply has a normal sized (80mm or 92mm?) fan and it is
    quiet, so the big 120mm fan should be practically silent.

    As for voltage regulation. I can't say if it is good or not (anyone
    comment?), but I get the following readouts in my hardware monitor:
    3.3v actually reads 3.312 or 3.328
    5v actually reads 4.945
    12v actually reads 12.096
    -12v actually reads -12.196
    -5v actually reads -5.005
    5vsb actually reads 5.072 (don't know what vsb is!)
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Tue, 12 Oct 2004 15:06:35 +0100, Franklin wrote:

    > What rating PSU should I use on a system which has an Athlon 2400+
    > with a modest graphics card (old GeForce2 MX 32MB) and 768 MB of SD-
    > RAM. Unusually, it will have *SIX* IDE internal hard drives.
    >
    > All the rest of the system is pretty normal with no overclocking on
    > the cpu.
    >
    > Would a decent 350W PSU be enough? I am thinking of this Nexus PSU.
    > http://www.nexustek.nl/nx3500.htm The specification chart shows
    > current delivery at min load, normal load, max load:
    >
    > +3.3V 0.3A 14.0A 21.2/28A
    > +5V 1.0A 12.7A 30/25.5A
    > +12V 0.2A 4.5A 16A
    >
    > (1) +3.3V & +5V total output not exceed 220Watt.
    > (1a) When +3.3V is loaded to 28A, then the +5V maximum load is 25.5A.
    > (1b) When +3.3V is loaded to 21.2A, the +5V maximum load is 30A.
    > (2) +3.3V & +5V & +12V total output not exceed 330Watt.
    >
    > ---
    >
    > Is this any good for my needs?

    With 6 drives I'd go with a larger power supply, get at least a 450W
    supply or even larger. An Antec 550W supply is only $108. You don't want
    to waste your time hunting down system glitches because you saved 30 bucks
    on a power supply.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Franklin wrote:
    > What rating PSU should I use on a system which has an Athlon 2400+
    > with a modest graphics card (old GeForce2 MX 32MB) and 768 MB of SD-
    > RAM. Unusually, it will have *SIX* IDE internal hard drives.
    >
    > All the rest of the system is pretty normal with no overclocking on
    > the cpu.
    >
    > Would a decent 350W PSU be enough? I am thinking of this Nexus PSU.
    > http://www.nexustek.nl/nx3500.htm The specification chart shows
    > current delivery at min load, normal load, max load:
    >
    > +3.3V 0.3A 14.0A 21.2/28A
    > +5V 1.0A 12.7A 30/25.5A
    > +12V 0.2A 4.5A 16A
    >
    > (1) +3.3V & +5V total output not exceed 220Watt.
    > (1a) When +3.3V is loaded to 28A, then the +5V maximum load is 25.5A.
    > (1b) When +3.3V is loaded to 21.2A, the +5V maximum load is 30A.
    > (2) +3.3V & +5V & +12V total output not exceed 330Watt.
    >
    > ---
    >
    > Is this any good for my needs?

    You really can't have too much, but you can have too little.

    When it comes to power supplies, I would just get a good name - like Antec
    True Power, around 430 watt to be safe.


    --
    Don Burnette
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Gareth Tuckwell" <ContactGT@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:CIRad.1904$4y4.1098@newsfe3-win.ntli.net...
    > "Franklin" <no_thanks@mail.com> wrote in message
    > news:958099B49C7BC71F3M4@130.133.1.4...
    >> What rating PSU should I use on a system which has an Athlon 2400+
    >> with a modest graphics card (old GeForce2 MX 32MB) and 768 MB of SD-
    >> RAM. Unusually, it will have *SIX* IDE internal hard drives.
    >>
    >> All the rest of the system is pretty normal with no overclocking on
    >> the cpu.
    >>
    >> Would a decent 350W PSU be enough? I am thinking of this Nexus PSU.
    >> http://www.nexustek.nl/nx3500.htm The specification chart shows
    >> current delivery at min load, normal load, max load:
    >
    > I can't comment on the power requirements, but I can say the power supply
    > I have is excellent. Its the Nexus NX 3000 (300W)and it really is quiet!
    > If I stop the other 2 fans in the system, I can only just hear it in a
    > quiet room! This power supply has a normal sized (80mm or 92mm?) fan and
    > it is quiet, so the big 120mm fan should be practically silent.
    >
    > As for voltage regulation. I can't say if it is good or not (anyone
    > comment?), but I get the following readouts in my hardware monitor:
    > 3.3v actually reads 3.312 or 3.328
    > 5v actually reads 4.945
    > 12v actually reads 12.096
    > -12v actually reads -12.196
    > -5v actually reads -5.005
    > 5vsb actually reads 5.072 (don't know what vsb is!)

    I should add that my NX 3000 (300w) power used to run this system without
    any problems:
    Athlon 2400+ (normal voltage and clocking)
    2GB (3 modules) SDRAM
    3 IDE hard disk drives
    1 IDE DVD drive
    1 SCSI cd writer
    Radeon 8500 AGP card
    1 wireless PCI
    1 network PCI
    1 sound card PCI
    9 fans!! (of various sizes)
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    > "Franklin" <no_thanks@mail.com> wrote in message
    > news:958099B49C7BC71F3M4@130.133.1.4...

    > > What rating PSU should I use on a system which has an Athlon 2400+
    > > with a modest graphics card (old GeForce2 MX 32MB) and 768 MB of SD-
    > > RAM. Unusually, it will have *SIX* IDE internal hard drives.
    > >
    > > All the rest of the system is pretty normal with no overclocking on
    > > the cpu.
    > >
    > > Would a decent 350W PSU be enough? I am thinking of this Nexus PSU.
    > > http://www.nexustek.nl/nx3500.htm

    Nexus is made by Fortron-Source, one of the best PSU makers in the
    world, but I don't know if the 16A @ +12V is enough for all that
    hardware. One person found that his XP1800+ system with five HDs
    (RPM unknown) and a couple of CD drives consumed only 160W from the AC
    lines, meaning that the computer was taking about 120W. And in 2002
    C'T magazine measured several computers equipped with XP2400+ CPUs,
    256M DDR, and GeForce3/Ti500 graphics cards and found that it took
    about 9A @ +12V, 2-4A @ +5V, and 9-12A @ +3.3V.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Tue, 12 Oct 2004 15:06:35 +0100, Franklin
    <no_thanks@mail.com> wrote:

    >What rating PSU should I use on a system which has an Athlon 2400+
    >with a modest graphics card (old GeForce2 MX 32MB) and 768 MB of SD-
    >RAM. Unusually, it will have *SIX* IDE internal hard drives.
    >
    >All the rest of the system is pretty normal with no overclocking on
    >the cpu.
    >
    >Would a decent 350W PSU be enough? I am thinking of this Nexus PSU.
    >http://www.nexustek.nl/nx3500.htm The specification chart shows
    >current delivery at min load, normal load, max load:
    >
    >+3.3V 0.3A 14.0A 21.2/28A
    >+5V 1.0A 12.7A 30/25.5A
    >+12V 0.2A 4.5A 16A
    >
    >(1) +3.3V & +5V total output not exceed 220Watt.
    >(1a) When +3.3V is loaded to 28A, then the +5V maximum load is 25.5A.
    >(1b) When +3.3V is loaded to 21.2A, the +5V maximum load is 30A.
    >(2) +3.3V & +5V & +12V total output not exceed 330Watt.
    >
    >---
    >
    >Is this any good for my needs?

    Nexus relabels Sparkle PSU. If you can find a Sparkle (or
    Fortron) 350W for lower price it would be better value.

    350W is enough for your system but if motherboard uses 12V
    for CPU (one sign of that would be that the board uses the
    "Intel" P4 4-pin 12V connector in addition to the ATX 20 pin
    connector) then it would provide more margin to choose 400W
    or higher (Nexus/Sparkle/Fortron will still be a good choice
    in 400W or higher).
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Franklin wrote:

    > What rating PSU should I use on a system which has an Athlon 2400+
    > with a modest graphics card (old GeForce2 MX 32MB) and 768 MB of SD-
    > RAM. Unusually, it will have *SIX* IDE internal hard drives.
    >
    > All the rest of the system is pretty normal with no overclocking on
    > the cpu.
    >
    > Would a decent 350W PSU be enough? I am thinking of this Nexus PSU.
    > http://www.nexustek.nl/nx3500.htm The specification chart shows
    > current delivery at min load, normal load, max load:
    >
    > +3.3V 0.3A 14.0A 21.2/28A
    > +5V 1.0A 12.7A 30/25.5A
    > +12V 0.2A 4.5A 16A
    >
    > (1) +3.3V & +5V total output not exceed 220Watt.
    > (1a) When +3.3V is loaded to 28A, then the +5V maximum load is 25.5A.
    > (1b) When +3.3V is loaded to 21.2A, the +5V maximum load is 30A.
    > (2) +3.3V & +5V & +12V total output not exceed 330Watt.
    >
    > ---
    >
    > Is this any good for my needs?

    The six hard drives will draw about 2 A each on startup. When running
    this will drop considerably. You could monitor the +12V rail during
    startup, but a normal voltmeter will not respond rapidly enough. A
    digital voltmeter needs about a second to compare the voltage under test
    to its internal standard and produce a reading. The 16 A rating should
    be ample, if it's a true rating and you don't add other things requiring
    +12 V.

    If it boots OK, and everything works, the supply should be fine.

    Virg Wall
    --
    A foolish consistency is the
    hobgoblin of little minds,........
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
    (Microsoft programmer's manual.)
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    >
    > You really can't have too much, but you can have too little.
    >
    > When it comes to power supplies, I would just get a good name - like Antec
    > True Power, around 430 watt to be safe.
    >
    >


    Heh..
    I dunno
    Climb a highline pole and put a 5v light across the 15kv lines ;P
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Tue, 12 Oct 2004 18:46:20 GMT, "rstlne" <.@text.news.virgin.net>
    wrote:

    >>
    >> You really can't have too much, but you can have too little.
    >>
    >> When it comes to power supplies, I would just get a good name - like Antec
    >> True Power, around 430 watt to be safe.
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    >Heh..
    >I dunno
    >Climb a highline pole and put a 5v light across the 15kv lines ;P
    >

    That's too much voltage. The extra power is a secondary result, of
    course.

    Tom
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    On Tue, 12 Oct 2004 15:06:35 +0100, Franklin <no_thanks@mail.com>
    wrote:

    >What rating PSU should I use on a system which has an Athlon 2400+
    >with a modest graphics card (old GeForce2 MX 32MB) and 768 MB of SD-
    >RAM. Unusually, it will have *SIX* IDE internal hard drives.


    Do what the big dogs do:

    http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProductDesc.asp?description=17-103-918&depa=0

    $112

    The published value of 36A on the 12 V rail is
    correct. It is *not* a typo on the web site.
    The box and the device itself mention this value of 36A also.

    the 24 pin power connector is by design
    backward compatible (search for the PDF file on
    the ATX specification 2.2).

    The only caveat is to have some space near pin 10
    of the female connector to accomodate for the not
    used 4 pins of the 24 pin male connector; if this space does
    not exist one has to use a 20 to 24 pin adapter cable

    http://www.pcpowercooling.com/products/cooling/accessories/popups/index_24to20.htm
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    >>Would a decent 350W PSU be enough? I am thinking of this Nexus PSU.
    >>> http://www.nexustek.nl/nx3500.htm The specification chart shows
    >>> current delivery at min load, normal load, max load:
    >>>
    >>> +3.3V 0.3A 14.0A 21.2/28A
    >>> +5V 1.0A 12.7A 30/25.5A
    >>> +12V 0.2A 4.5A 16A
    >>>
    >>> (1) +3.3V & +5V total output not exceed 220Watt.
    >>> (1a) When +3.3V is loaded to 28A, then the +5V maximum load is 25.5A.
    >>> (1b) When +3.3V is loaded to 21.2A, the +5V maximum load is 30A.
    >>> (2) +3.3V & +5V & +12V total output not exceed 330Watt.
    >>>
    >>> ---
    >>>
    >>> Is this any good for my needs?
    >
    >
    > With 6 drives I'd go with a larger power supply, get at least a 450W
    > supply or even larger. An Antec 550W supply is only $108. You don't want
    > to waste your time hunting down system glitches because you saved 30 bucks
    > on a power supply.
    >

    You don't want to waste $30 for nothing, either.
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Franklin" <no_thanks@mail.com> wrote in message
    news:958099B49C7BC71F3M4@130.133.1.4...
    > What rating PSU should I use on a system which has an Athlon 2400+
    > with a modest graphics card (old GeForce2 MX 32MB) and 768 MB of SD-
    > RAM. Unusually, it will have *SIX* IDE internal hard drives.
    >
    > All the rest of the system is pretty normal with no overclocking on
    > the cpu.
    >
    > Would a decent 350W PSU be enough? I am thinking of this Nexus PSU.
    > http://www.nexustek.nl/nx3500.htm The specification chart shows
    > current delivery at min load, normal load, max load:
    >
    > +3.3V 0.3A 14.0A 21.2/28A
    > +5V 1.0A 12.7A 30/25.5A
    > +12V 0.2A 4.5A 16A
    >
    > (1) +3.3V & +5V total output not exceed 220Watt.
    > (1a) When +3.3V is loaded to 28A, then the +5V maximum load is 25.5A.
    > (1b) When +3.3V is loaded to 21.2A, the +5V maximum load is 30A.
    > (2) +3.3V & +5V & +12V total output not exceed 330Watt.
    >
    > ---
    >
    > Is this any good for my needs?

    Go for a cheap Sparkle / Fortron branded PSU of the region 350-450w.
    My sparkle 300w has been heavily loaded over the last 3 years and still runs
    cool + quiet.

    Hamman
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    i know very little about pwer, but from what i know a 350w will be ok, a
    decent one though, i have a cheap one and i keep getting IRQL errors, im not
    sure if they are related to the PSU or memory, but someone at uni has told
    me a 400w PSU is reccomended with all AMD Athlon XP's
  14. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Hmmm ... I think you should more seriously be thinking about an Antec 550
    Watt True Power supply.

    --
    DaveW


    "Franklin" <no_thanks@mail.com> wrote in message
    news:958099B49C7BC71F3M4@130.133.1.4...
    > What rating PSU should I use on a system which has an Athlon 2400+
    > with a modest graphics card (old GeForce2 MX 32MB) and 768 MB of SD-
    > RAM. Unusually, it will have *SIX* IDE internal hard drives.
    >
    > All the rest of the system is pretty normal with no overclocking on
    > the cpu.
    >
    > Would a decent 350W PSU be enough? I am thinking of this Nexus PSU.
    > http://www.nexustek.nl/nx3500.htm The specification chart shows
    > current delivery at min load, normal load, max load:
    >
    > +3.3V 0.3A 14.0A 21.2/28A
    > +5V 1.0A 12.7A 30/25.5A
    > +12V 0.2A 4.5A 16A
    >
    > (1) +3.3V & +5V total output not exceed 220Watt.
    > (1a) When +3.3V is loaded to 28A, then the +5V maximum load is 25.5A.
    > (1b) When +3.3V is loaded to 21.2A, the +5V maximum load is 30A.
    > (2) +3.3V & +5V & +12V total output not exceed 330Watt.
    >
    > ---
    >
    > Is this any good for my needs?
  15. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Tue, 12 Oct 2004 23:05:23 GMT, "DaveW" <none@zero.org> wrote:

    >Hmmm ... I think you should more seriously be thinking about an Antec 550
    >Watt True Power supply.

    With that many Hd's I'd be thinking about dedicating one good psu to
    the motherboard and the optical drives/floppy and using separate
    supplies for alll those Hd's.(maybe 2 drives to a psu rated at at
    least 350-400 watts.)
    Depends on what type of computing you'll doing and how intensive too.
  16. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Tue, 12 Oct 2004 21:23:10 GMT, Al Smith <invalid@address.com>
    wrote:

    >>>Would a decent 350W PSU be enough? I am thinking of this Nexus PSU.
    >>>> http://www.nexustek.nl/nx3500.htm The specification chart shows
    >>>> current delivery at min load, normal load, max load:
    >>>>
    >>>> +3.3V 0.3A 14.0A 21.2/28A
    >>>> +5V 1.0A 12.7A 30/25.5A
    >>>> +12V 0.2A 4.5A 16A
    >>>>
    >>>> (1) +3.3V & +5V total output not exceed 220Watt.
    >>>> (1a) When +3.3V is loaded to 28A, then the +5V maximum load is 25.5A.
    >>>> (1b) When +3.3V is loaded to 21.2A, the +5V maximum load is 30A.
    >>>> (2) +3.3V & +5V & +12V total output not exceed 330Watt.
    >>>>
    >>>> ---
    >>>>
    >>>> Is this any good for my needs?
    >>
    >>
    >> With 6 drives I'd go with a larger power supply, get at least a 450W
    >> supply or even larger. An Antec 550W supply is only $108. You don't want
    >> to waste your time hunting down system glitches because you saved 30 bucks
    >> on a power supply.
    >>
    >
    >You don't want to waste $30 for nothing, either.

    Yes you do. The lowest rated supply I use for Athalon systems is 400
    watts, and that is only with one HD.
    Anymore and I go with a 500 watt.
    Believe me if you really try and do any serious computing loads with
    an under rated power supply you're asking for serious migraines.
  17. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Tue, 12 Oct 2004 22:20:30 +0100, "Christo" <chris@juststuff.co.uk>
    wrote:

    >i know very little about pwer, but from what i know a 350w will be ok, a
    >decent one though, i have a cheap one and i keep getting IRQL errors, im not
    >sure if they are related to the PSU or memory, but someone at uni has told
    >me a 400w PSU is reccomended with all AMD Athlon XP's
    >
    Correct. And that is the lowest one should use.
    I do video/film editing on Athalons and anything lower than 400 will
    give you constant locks and blue screens.
    The inrush and overcurrent ratings are critical too.
    At least 30 on the 5v and 25 on the 12v is required.
    You can NEVER have to much power.
    A good trick is to split the load between multiple psu, does require a
    bit of moding though.
  18. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "General Schvantzkoph" <schvantzkoph@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:pan.2004.10.12.16.41.25.775421@yahoo.com...
    > On Tue, 12 Oct 2004 15:06:35 +0100, Franklin wrote:
    >
    > > What rating PSU should I use on a system which has an Athlon 2400+
    > > with a modest graphics card (old GeForce2 MX 32MB) and 768 MB of SD-
    > > RAM. Unusually, it will have *SIX* IDE internal hard drives.
    > >
    > > All the rest of the system is pretty normal with no overclocking on
    > > the cpu.
    > >
    > > Would a decent 350W PSU be enough? I am thinking of this Nexus PSU.
    > > http://www.nexustek.nl/nx3500.htm The specification chart shows
    > > current delivery at min load, normal load, max load:
    > >
    > > +3.3V 0.3A 14.0A 21.2/28A
    > > +5V 1.0A 12.7A 30/25.5A
    > > +12V 0.2A 4.5A 16A
    > >
    > > (1) +3.3V & +5V total output not exceed 220Watt.
    > > (1a) When +3.3V is loaded to 28A, then the +5V maximum load is
    25.5A.
    > > (1b) When +3.3V is loaded to 21.2A, the +5V maximum load is 30A.
    > > (2) +3.3V & +5V & +12V total output not exceed 330Watt.
    > >
    > > ---
    > >
    > > Is this any good for my needs?
    >
    > With 6 drives I'd go with a larger power supply, get at least a 450W
    > supply or even larger. An Antec 550W supply is only $108. You don't
    want
    > to waste your time hunting down system glitches because you saved 30
    bucks
    > on a power supply.

    The wattage is important, but int his case, the +12V is more important
    because of the very high +12V current needed to start up the hard disks.
    Someone else mentioned 2A per HDD at atartup but there are also other
    +12V loads, such as the fans. So getting a PSU that has a lot higher
    than usual +12V current rating is a _must_.

    One other important thing. Putting 6 hard disks in a case demands that
    there be a lot of air circulating around them. If you don't keep thenm
    cool, then the ones closest to the middle of the stack will overheat and
    die. I've seen that happen in servers. You might consider using
    external HDDs if you have problems.
  19. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Don Burnette" <d.burnette@clothes.comcast.net> wrote in message
    news:DOCdnSqUMKM3kfHcRVn-gw@giganews.com...
    > Franklin wrote:
    > > What rating PSU should I use on a system which has an Athlon 2400+
    > > with a modest graphics card (old GeForce2 MX 32MB) and 768 MB of SD-
    > > RAM. Unusually, it will have *SIX* IDE internal hard drives.
    > >
    > > All the rest of the system is pretty normal with no overclocking on
    > > the cpu.
    > >
    > > Would a decent 350W PSU be enough? I am thinking of this Nexus PSU.
    > > http://www.nexustek.nl/nx3500.htm The specification chart shows
    > > current delivery at min load, normal load, max load:
    > >
    > > +3.3V 0.3A 14.0A 21.2/28A
    > > +5V 1.0A 12.7A 30/25.5A
    > > +12V 0.2A 4.5A 16A
    > >
    > > (1) +3.3V & +5V total output not exceed 220Watt.
    > > (1a) When +3.3V is loaded to 28A, then the +5V maximum load is
    25.5A.
    > > (1b) When +3.3V is loaded to 21.2A, the +5V maximum load is 30A.
    > > (2) +3.3V & +5V & +12V total output not exceed 330Watt.
    > >
    > > ---
    > >
    > > Is this any good for my needs?
    >
    > You really can't have too much, but you can have too little.

    What kind of twisted logic made you come up with that statement?
    Why don't you say what you _really_ mean?
    "You really should buy a PSU that has too much, rather than too little
    power."


    > When it comes to power supplies, I would just get a good name - like
    Antec
    > True Power, around 430 watt to be safe.

    > --
    > Don Burnette
  20. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "rstlne" <.@text.news.virgin.net> wrote in message
    news:0EVad.1414$cm4.260@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
    > >
    > > You really can't have too much, but you can have too little.
    > >
    > > When it comes to power supplies, I would just get a good name - like
    Antec
    > > True Power, around 430 watt to be safe.
    >
    > Heh..
    > I dunno
    > Climb a highline pole and put a 5v light across the 15kv lines ;P

    Brilliant!!
  21. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Watson A.Name - "Watt Sun, the Dark Remover" wrote:

    > "rstlne" <.@text.news.virgin.net> wrote in message
    > news:0EVad.1414$cm4.260@newsfe1-win.ntli.net...
    >
    >>>You really can't have too much, but you can have too little.
    >>>
    >>>When it comes to power supplies, I would just get a good name - like
    >
    > Antec
    >
    >>>True Power, around 430 watt to be safe.
    >>
    >>Heh..
    >>I dunno
    >>Climb a highline pole and put a 5v light across the 15kv lines ;P
    >
    >
    > Brilliant!!
    >

    Briefly
  22. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Wed, 13 Oct 2004 01:53:07 -0500, none
    <gothika@bellsouth.net> wrote:

    >On Tue, 12 Oct 2004 21:23:10 GMT, Al Smith <invalid@address.com>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>>>Would a decent 350W PSU be enough? I am thinking of this Nexus PSU.
    >>>>> http://www.nexustek.nl/nx3500.htm The specification chart shows
    >>>>> current delivery at min load, normal load, max load:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> +3.3V 0.3A 14.0A 21.2/28A
    >>>>> +5V 1.0A 12.7A 30/25.5A
    >>>>> +12V 0.2A 4.5A 16A
    >>>>>
    >>>>> (1) +3.3V & +5V total output not exceed 220Watt.
    >>>>> (1a) When +3.3V is loaded to 28A, then the +5V maximum load is 25.5A.
    >>>>> (1b) When +3.3V is loaded to 21.2A, the +5V maximum load is 30A.
    >>>>> (2) +3.3V & +5V & +12V total output not exceed 330Watt.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> ---
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Is this any good for my needs?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> With 6 drives I'd go with a larger power supply, get at least a 450W
    >>> supply or even larger. An Antec 550W supply is only $108. You don't want
    >>> to waste your time hunting down system glitches because you saved 30 bucks
    >>> on a power supply.
    >>>
    >>
    >>You don't want to waste $30 for nothing, either.
    >
    >Yes you do. The lowest rated supply I use for Athalon systems is 400
    >watts, and that is only with one HD.
    >Anymore and I go with a 500 watt.
    >Believe me if you really try and do any serious computing loads with
    >an under rated power supply you're asking for serious migraines.


    It's true that an insufficient power supply can cause both
    instability and eventual damage, but the typical Athlon
    system does not need 400W, and there is almost no "PC"
    system that needs 500W, even if the vast majority of the
    current were concentrated on only the 5V or 12V rail.

    With a typical PC, that being current-gen CPU, a couple hard
    drives, budget/low-end video card, etc, 300W PSU in a good
    name brand is sufficient. SFF systems demonstrate every day
    that even a 180-250W PSU will run a modern built with enough
    margin for another hard drive or two... but the PSU may need
    replaced sooner.

    Generics on the other hand, are a lottery. Their wattage
    rating means almost nothing, they can only be assumed to be
    somewhere inbetween 200W and 400W without further evidence.
  23. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Wed, 13 Oct 2004 01:57:34 -0500, none
    <gothika@bellsouth.net> wrote:

    >On Tue, 12 Oct 2004 22:20:30 +0100, "Christo" <chris@juststuff.co.uk>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>i know very little about pwer, but from what i know a 350w will be ok, a
    >>decent one though, i have a cheap one and i keep getting IRQL errors, im not
    >>sure if they are related to the PSU or memory, but someone at uni has told
    >>me a 400w PSU is reccomended with all AMD Athlon XP's
    >>
    >Correct. And that is the lowest one should use.
    >I do video/film editing on Athalons and anything lower than 400 will
    >give you constant locks and blue screens.
    >The inrush and overcurrent ratings are critical too.
    >At least 30 on the 5v and 25 on the 12v is required.
    >You can NEVER have to much power.
    >A good trick is to split the load between multiple psu, does require a
    >bit of moding though.

    Not true. I also have done quite a bit of video editing and
    other full loads for extended periods of time and am quite
    sure that 30A on 5V is not needed if CPU doesn't use 5V for
    VRM circuit, and that even if CPU uses 12V for VRM circuit,
    it will not need 25A. If you had instability you either
    have very atypically high load beyond what was mentioned, or
    very poor power supplies.... like generics that are quite
    overrated.
  24. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Wed, 13 Oct 2004 07:55:14 +0000, kony wrote:

    > On Wed, 13 Oct 2004 01:53:07 -0500, none
    > <gothika@bellsouth.net> wrote:
    >
    >>On Tue, 12 Oct 2004 21:23:10 GMT, Al Smith <invalid@address.com>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>>>>Would a decent 350W PSU be enough? I am thinking of this Nexus PSU.
    >>>>>> http://www.nexustek.nl/nx3500.htm The specification chart shows
    >>>>>> current delivery at min load, normal load, max load:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> +3.3V 0.3A 14.0A 21.2/28A
    >>>>>> +5V 1.0A 12.7A 30/25.5A
    >>>>>> +12V 0.2A 4.5A 16A
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> (1) +3.3V & +5V total output not exceed 220Watt.
    >>>>>> (1a) When +3.3V is loaded to 28A, then the +5V maximum load is 25.5A.
    >>>>>> (1b) When +3.3V is loaded to 21.2A, the +5V maximum load is 30A.
    >>>>>> (2) +3.3V & +5V & +12V total output not exceed 330Watt.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> ---
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Is this any good for my needs?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> With 6 drives I'd go with a larger power supply, get at least a 450W
    >>>> supply or even larger. An Antec 550W supply is only $108. You don't want
    >>>> to waste your time hunting down system glitches because you saved 30 bucks
    >>>> on a power supply.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>You don't want to waste $30 for nothing, either.
    >>
    >>Yes you do. The lowest rated supply I use for Athalon systems is 400
    >>watts, and that is only with one HD.
    >>Anymore and I go with a 500 watt.
    >>Believe me if you really try and do any serious computing loads with
    >>an under rated power supply you're asking for serious migraines.
    >
    >
    > It's true that an insufficient power supply can cause both
    > instability and eventual damage, but the typical Athlon
    > system does not need 400W, and there is almost no "PC"
    > system that needs 500W, even if the vast majority of the
    > current were concentrated on only the 5V or 12V rail.
    >
    > With a typical PC, that being current-gen CPU, a couple hard
    > drives, budget/low-end video card, etc, 300W PSU in a good
    > name brand is sufficient. SFF systems demonstrate every day
    > that even a 180-250W PSU will run a modern built with enough
    > margin for another hard drive or two... but the PSU may need
    > replaced sooner.
    >
    > Generics on the other hand, are a lottery. Their wattage
    > rating means almost nothing, they can only be assumed to be
    > somewhere inbetween 200W and 400W without further evidence.

    The OP seems to be talking about a file server not a desktop PC. It's
    hard to imagine why you would need 6 drives on a desktop. The disks are
    going to be working much harder in a file server then they would be in a
    PC. The symptom of a power supply problem on a file server is that a disk
    suddenly drops off line, they system continues to run but you've lost that
    drive until you do a reboot. It's very annoying. It's much better to spend
    a few more dollars to get a robust supply. There will be $1000 worth of
    drives in that system, it's silly to worry about 30 or 40 bucks extra for
    a 550W supply vs a 350W.
  25. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    > One other important thing. Putting 6 hard disks in a case demands that
    > there be a lot of air circulating around them. If you don't keep thenm
    > cool, then the ones closest to the middle of the stack will overheat and
    > die. I've seen that happen in servers. You might consider using
    > external HDDs if you have problems.

    You solve the problem by getting a server case that's designed to handle a
    large number of drives. You want a case that has good air flow over all of
    the drives. It's OK to passively cool a single drive in a desktop machine
    because desktop drives have very little activity. In a fileserver the
    drives work much harder so you need to blow air over them to keep them
    cool.
  26. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "larrymoencurly" <larrymoencurly@my-deja.com> wrote in message
    news:755e968a.0410121254.487a0a0c@posting.google.com...
    >> "Franklin" <no_thanks@mail.com> wrote in message
    >> news:958099B49C7BC71F3M4@130.133.1.4...
    >
    >> > What rating PSU should I use on a system which has an Athlon 2400+
    >> > with a modest graphics card (old GeForce2 MX 32MB) and 768 MB of SD-
    >> > RAM. Unusually, it will have *SIX* IDE internal hard drives.
    >> >
    >> > All the rest of the system is pretty normal with no overclocking on
    >> > the cpu.
    >> >
    >> > Would a decent 350W PSU be enough? I am thinking of this Nexus PSU.
    >> > http://www.nexustek.nl/nx3500.htm
    >
    > Nexus is made by Fortron-Source, one of the best PSU makers in the
    > world, but I don't know if the 16A @ +12V is enough for all that
    > hardware. One person found that his XP1800+ system with five HDs
    > (RPM unknown) and a couple of CD drives consumed only 160W from the AC
    > lines, meaning that the computer was taking about 120W. And in 2002
    > C'T magazine measured several computers equipped with XP2400+ CPUs,
    > 256M DDR, and GeForce3/Ti500 graphics cards and found that it took
    > about 9A @ +12V, 2-4A @ +5V, and 9-12A @ +3.3V.

    The problems tend to be under peak load, especially at cold boot. At cold
    boot, when all the disks are spinning up for the first time, likewise the
    fans, likewise the CPU initialising, the peak current required can be much
    higher. And then you find problems like perhaps your soundcard doesn't
    always initialise properly (which used to happen to me with an old Enermax
    350w PSU).

    Chip
  27. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Wed, 13 Oct 2004 09:22:57 -0400, General Schvantzkoph
    <schvantzkoph@yahoo.com> wrote:


    >> It's true that an insufficient power supply can cause both
    >> instability and eventual damage, but the typical Athlon
    >> system does not need 400W, and there is almost no "PC"
    >> system that needs 500W, even if the vast majority of the
    >> current were concentrated on only the 5V or 12V rail.
    >>
    >> With a typical PC, that being current-gen CPU, a couple hard
    >> drives, budget/low-end video card, etc, 300W PSU in a good
    >> name brand is sufficient. SFF systems demonstrate every day
    >> that even a 180-250W PSU will run a modern built with enough
    >> margin for another hard drive or two... but the PSU may need
    >> replaced sooner.
    >>
    >> Generics on the other hand, are a lottery. Their wattage
    >> rating means almost nothing, they can only be assumed to be
    >> somewhere inbetween 200W and 400W without further evidence.
    >
    >The OP seems to be talking about a file server not a desktop PC. It's
    >hard to imagine why you would need 6 drives on a desktop. The disks are
    >going to be working much harder in a file server then they would be in a
    >PC. The symptom of a power supply problem on a file server is that a disk
    >suddenly drops off line, they system continues to run but you've lost that
    >drive until you do a reboot. It's very annoying. It's much better to spend
    >a few more dollars to get a robust supply. There will be $1000 worth of
    >drives in that system, it's silly to worry about 30 or 40 bucks extra for
    >a 550W supply vs a 350W.
    >

    Possibly a file server but then why the Athlon XP2400?
    Seems a bit overpowered if the goal is to minimize power
    usage, or rather, buy an economical PSU for the role played.

    Even so you may be right, _IF_ the drives, data, or
    function, productivity loss is significant from a failure
    then it's easily justifiable to budget more for larger
    wattage PSU.
  28. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Matt wrote:
    > none wrote:
    >
    >> With that many Hd's I'd be thinking about dedicating one good psu to
    >> the motherboard and the optical drives/floppy and using separate
    >> supplies for alll those Hd's.(maybe 2 drives to a psu rated at at
    >> least 350-400 watts.)

    That way, he would have about 250-300 watts left over on each!
    >
    > That way he could avoid about a half hour's mental work.
    >
    > Except he would have to figure how to rig a computer using four power
    > supplies instead of one.

    Or he could put a 12V automobile storage battery and charger under the
    desk and hook all the drive's 12V input to that! ;-) That way if he had
    a power failure, the drives would keep spinning and upon power return,
    he wouldn't have to let them warm up as another poster suggested. :-(

    Seriously, once the drives are spun up, they require only ~1 A each.
    Fans have even less requirements: < 1/2 A each.

    Some motherboards and video cards use considerable 12V power, but this
    is not the case here.

    Having more real real available than is required does nothing for
    stability or anything else!

    Virg Wall
    --
    A foolish consistency is the
    hobgoblin of little minds,........
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
    (Microsoft programmer's manual.)
  29. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Tue, 12 Oct 2004 15:06:35 +0100, Franklin <no_thanks@mail.com> wrote:

    >What rating PSU should I use on a system which has an Athlon 2400+
    >with a modest graphics card (old GeForce2 MX 32MB) and 768 MB of SD-
    >RAM. Unusually, it will have *SIX* IDE internal hard drives.
    >
    >All the rest of the system is pretty normal with no overclocking on
    >the cpu.
    >
    >Would a decent 350W PSU be enough? I am thinking of this Nexus PSU.
    >http://www.nexustek.nl/nx3500.htm The specification chart shows
    >current delivery at min load, normal load, max load:
    >
    >+3.3V 0.3A 14.0A 21.2/28A
    >+5V 1.0A 12.7A 30/25.5A
    >+12V 0.2A 4.5A 16A
    >
    >(1) +3.3V & +5V total output not exceed 220Watt.
    >(1a) When +3.3V is loaded to 28A, then the +5V maximum load is 25.5A.
    >(1b) When +3.3V is loaded to 21.2A, the +5V maximum load is 30A.
    >(2) +3.3V & +5V & +12V total output not exceed 330Watt.
    >
    >---
    >
    >Is this any good for my needs?

    Thermaltake 420 watt PurePower $39.00
    An excellent power supply that will meet your needs.
    http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProductDesc.asp?description=17-153-006&depa=0

    regards

    Dud
    --

    You! Out of the gene pool!
  30. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Wed, 13 Oct 2004 01:45:38 -0500, none <gothika@bellsouth.net>
    wrote:

    >On Tue, 12 Oct 2004 23:05:23 GMT, "DaveW" <none@zero.org> wrote:
    >
    >>Hmmm ... I think you should more seriously be thinking about an Antec 550
    >>Watt True Power supply.
    >
    >With that many Hd's I'd be thinking about dedicating one good psu to
    >the motherboard and the optical drives/floppy and using separate
    >supplies for alll those Hd's.(maybe 2 drives to a psu rated at at
    >least 350-400 watts.)
    >Depends on what type of computing you'll doing and how intensive too.

    I forget, but do the drives use both +5 and +12, and, if so, will this
    arrangement be enough to regulate a supply?

    Tom
  31. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Tom MacIntyre" <tom__macintyre@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:punqm0ht6vikt57vqnc1hj0nu1gniqqa8j@4ax.com...
    > On Wed, 13 Oct 2004 01:45:38 -0500, none <gothika@bellsouth.net>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>On Tue, 12 Oct 2004 23:05:23 GMT, "DaveW" <none@zero.org> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Hmmm ... I think you should more seriously be thinking about an Antec 550
    >>>Watt True Power supply.
    >>
    >>With that many Hd's I'd be thinking about dedicating one good psu to
    >>the motherboard and the optical drives/floppy and using separate
    >>supplies for alll those Hd's.(maybe 2 drives to a psu rated at at
    >>least 350-400 watts.)
    >>Depends on what type of computing you'll doing and how intensive too.
    >
    > I forget, but do the drives use both +5 and +12,

    Yes.

    > and, if so, will this
    > arrangement be enough to regulate a supply?

    I don't know what you mean by that.

    Chip
  32. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Wed, 13 Oct 2004 18:45:15 +0100, "Chip" <anneonymouse@virgin.net>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Tom MacIntyre" <tom__macintyre@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    >news:punqm0ht6vikt57vqnc1hj0nu1gniqqa8j@4ax.com...
    >> On Wed, 13 Oct 2004 01:45:38 -0500, none <gothika@bellsouth.net>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Tue, 12 Oct 2004 23:05:23 GMT, "DaveW" <none@zero.org> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Hmmm ... I think you should more seriously be thinking about an Antec 550
    >>>>Watt True Power supply.
    >>>
    >>>With that many Hd's I'd be thinking about dedicating one good psu to
    >>>the motherboard and the optical drives/floppy and using separate
    >>>supplies for alll those Hd's.(maybe 2 drives to a psu rated at at
    >>>least 350-400 watts.)
    >>>Depends on what type of computing you'll doing and how intensive too.
    >>
    >> I forget, but do the drives use both +5 and +12,
    >
    >Yes.
    >
    >> and, if so, will this
    >> arrangement be enough to regulate a supply?
    >
    >I don't know what you mean by that.
    >
    >Chip
    >
    Computer supplies need to be regulated to achieve the correct output
    voltage, and both the 12 and 5 volt supplies may need to be loaded to
    a certain level to achieve this.

    Tom
  33. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On 13 Oct 2004, General Schvantzkoph wrote:

    > On Wed, 13 Oct 2004 07:55:14 +0000, kony wrote:
    >
    >> On Wed, 13 Oct 2004 01:53:07 -0500, none
    >> <gothika@bellsouth.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Tue, 12 Oct 2004 21:23:10 GMT, Al Smith
    >>><invalid@address.com> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>>>Would a decent 350W PSU be enough? I am thinking of this
    >>>>>>Nexus PSU.
    >>>>>>> http://www.nexustek.nl/nx3500.htm The specification chart
    >>>>>>> shows current delivery at min load, normal load, max load:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> +3.3V 0.3A 14.0A 21.2/28A
    >>>>>>> +5V 1.0A 12.7A 30/25.5A
    >>>>>>> +12V 0.2A 4.5A 16A
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> (1) +3.3V & +5V total output not exceed 220Watt.
    >>>>>>> (1a) When +3.3V is loaded to 28A, then the +5V maximum
    >>>>>>> load is 25.5A. (1b) When +3.3V is loaded to 21.2A, the +5V
    >>>>>>> maximum load is 30A. (2) +3.3V & +5V & +12V total output
    >>>>>>> not exceed 330Watt.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> ---
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Is this any good for my needs?
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> With 6 drives I'd go with a larger power supply, get at
    >>>>> least a 450W supply or even larger. An Antec 550W supply is
    >>>>> only $108. You don't want to waste your time hunting down
    >>>>> system glitches because you saved 30 bucks on a power
    >>>>> supply.
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>You don't want to waste $30 for nothing, either.
    >>>
    >>>Yes you do. The lowest rated supply I use for Athalon systems
    >>>is 400 watts, and that is only with one HD.
    >>>Anymore and I go with a 500 watt.
    >>>Believe me if you really try and do any serious computing loads
    >>>with an under rated power supply you're asking for serious
    >>>migraines.
    >>
    >>
    >> It's true that an insufficient power supply can cause both
    >> instability and eventual damage, but the typical Athlon
    >> system does not need 400W, and there is almost no "PC"
    >> system that needs 500W, even if the vast majority of the
    >> current were concentrated on only the 5V or 12V rail.
    >>
    >> With a typical PC, that being current-gen CPU, a couple hard
    >> drives, budget/low-end video card, etc, 300W PSU in a good
    >> name brand is sufficient. SFF systems demonstrate every day
    >> that even a 180-250W PSU will run a modern built with enough
    >> margin for another hard drive or two... but the PSU may need
    >> replaced sooner.
    >>
    >> Generics on the other hand, are a lottery. Their wattage
    >> rating means almost nothing, they can only be assumed to be
    >> somewhere inbetween 200W and 400W without further evidence.


    > The OP seems to be talking about a file server not a desktop PC.
    > It's hard to imagine why you would need 6 drives on a desktop.

    I am the OP. I guess I am a bit weird but it is my home PC on my
    desktop and used as a single user system. I have 6 drives to back up
    partitions and to store my data.

    > The disks are going to be working much harder in a file server
    > then they would be in a PC. The symptom of a power supply
    > problem on a file server is that a disk suddenly drops off line,
    > they system continues to run but you've lost that drive until
    > you do a reboot. It's very annoying. It's much better to spend
    > a few more dollars to get a robust supply. There will be $1000
    > worth of drives in that system, it's silly to worry about 30 or
    > 40 bucks extra for a 550W supply vs a 350W.

    Nowadays these sort of drives cost about $100 each (for 120 GB or
    thereabouts). The older drives cost me more but are even cheaper to
    replace at today's cost.
  34. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On 13 Oct 2004, General Schvantzkoph wrote:

    >> One other important thing. Putting 6 hard disks in a case
    >> demands that there be a lot of air circulating around them. If
    >> you don't keep thenm cool, then the ones closest to the middle
    >> of the stack will overheat and die. I've seen that happen in
    >> servers. You might consider using external HDDs if you have
    >> problems.
    >
    > You solve the problem by getting a server case that's designed
    > to handle a large number of drives. You want a case that has
    > good air flow over all of the drives. It's OK to passively cool
    > a single drive in a desktop machine because desktop drives have
    > very little activity. In a fileserver the drives work much
    > harder so you need to blow air over them to keep them cool.


    I am the OP.

    I have solved my problem of heat generation by not buying IBM/Hitchi
    or Western Digital hard drives. Those drives undoubedly perform well
    but they get way too hot and can be a bit too noisy for me.

    My hottest drive is a Seagate Barracuda and Dtemp from
    http://private.peterlink.ru/tochinov/ says it runs at 41 C. It is
    the system drive with most of the read/write action, The other
    drives run at a comfortable 30 to 35 C when idling.

    My cooling is very simple. I have the PSU fan, the cpu fan and one
    80mm case fan which I run at less than half speed to keep the noise
    down. The ambient room temp is about 20C.

    It is almost a 'bumble-bee' system. I am told that early dynamics
    theory calculated that the bumble-bee should not be able to fly.
    Theory suggests my PC should not be so cool nor so quiet. But in
    real life it works.
  35. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Al Smith <invalid@address.com> wrote in message news:<2XXad.147054$Np3.6335131@ursa-nb00s0.nbnet.nb.ca>...
    > >>Would a decent 350W PSU be enough? I am thinking of this Nexus PSU.
    > >>> http://www.nexustek.nl/nx3500.htm The specification chart shows
    > >>> current delivery at min load, normal load, max load:
    > >>>
    > >>> +3.3V 0.3A 14.0A 21.2/28A
    > >>> +5V 1.0A 12.7A 30/25.5A
    > >>> +12V 0.2A 4.5A 16A
    > >>>
    > >>> (1) +3.3V & +5V total output not exceed 220Watt.
    > >>> (1a) When +3.3V is loaded to 28A, then the +5V maximum load is 25.5A.
    > >>> (1b) When +3.3V is loaded to 21.2A, the +5V maximum load is 30A.
    > >>> (2) +3.3V & +5V & +12V total output not exceed 330Watt.
    > >>>
    > >>> ---
    > >>>
    > >>> Is this any good for my needs?
    > >
    > >
    > > With 6 drives I'd go with a larger power supply, get at least a 450W
    > > supply or even larger. An Antec 550W supply is only $108. You don't want
    > > to waste your time hunting down system glitches because you saved 30 bucks
    > > on a power supply.
    > >
    >
    > You don't want to waste $30 for nothing, either.

    Actually I would. It takes very little time use up $30 tracking down
    the problem. And THEN, you STILL have to get the bigger supply. After
    the computer and 6 HDDs, $30 is nothing.
    My $0.02
    gg
  36. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Wed, 13 Oct 2004 18:15:06 GMT, Tom MacIntyre
    <tom__macintyre@hotmail.com> wrote:


    >>> I forget, but do the drives use both +5 and +12,
    >>
    >>Yes.
    >>
    >>> and, if so, will this
    >>> arrangement be enough to regulate a supply?
    >>
    >>I don't know what you mean by that.
    >>
    >>Chip
    >>
    >Computer supplies need to be regulated to achieve the correct output
    >voltage, and both the 12 and 5 volt supplies may need to be loaded to
    >a certain level to achieve this.
    >
    >Tom


    Yes a drive, two at most is plenty of load for regulation
    within tolerances on any halfway decent power supply.
  37. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    In article <10mss5rdnqfa51d@corp.supernews.com>, Watson A.Name - \"Watt
    Sun, the Dark Remover\" wrote:
    >
    >I'm surprised at all the posts that have so many assertions, yet so
    >little thought and consideration. I don't think I've yet seen an
    >authoritative URL or two to back up those assertions.
    >
    >Very little solid advice. Like check the hard disk and see what the
    >current ratings are, and add them up to get a total. Especially the
    >+12VDC because the motor takes quite a bit of current from that.
    >
    >And I really detest those claims that PCs don't use very much power.
    >The most I can get on a 20A circuit is about a dozen, and the breaker
    >blows. I figure that's about 150W per PC. And those are old timers,
    >like P233s.

    How many watts, how many volt-amps, and what's the efficiency as well
    as the power factor of the power supply?

    - Don Klipstein (don@misty.com)
  38. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Thu, 14 Oct 2004 15:49:37 GMT, Tom MacIntyre
    <tom__macintyre@hotmail.com> wrote:


    >>14A of stable, clean power is enough for most basic systems.
    >>It might not be sufficient for 6 drives PLUS a CPU using 12V
    >>rail for power, nor adding a high-end modern video card, but
    >>it would run any typical mid-grade system fine (if that 14A
    >>were from a decent PSU).
    >
    >The CPU doesn't need the 12 VDC, does it?
    >
    >That is part of the problem with PS choice...the consideration must be
    >made for amperage needs for all voltages, not just total power.

    Yes, modern P4 or Athlon 64 platforms and many (mostly
    nForce2) Athlon XP do use 12V for CPU. The CPU power is
    derived from 12V input by step down regulation. Any board
    using 12V for CPU power will have the "Intel" 4-pin 12V
    connector on it. When there is no 4-pin 12V input the odds
    are overwhelming on a "PC" that it's using 5V for CPU power,
    as did earlier Athlon & Pentium 3 'boards.
  39. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On 12 Oct 2004, kony wrote:
    >
    > Nexus relabels Sparkle PSU. If you can find a Sparkle (or
    > Fortron) 350W for lower price it would be better value.
    >
    > 350W is enough for your system but if motherboard uses 12V
    > for CPU (one sign of that would be that the board uses the
    > "Intel" P4 4-pin 12V connector in addition to the ATX 20 pin
    > connector) then it would provide more margin to choose 400W
    > or higher (Nexus/Sparkle/Fortron will still be a good choice
    > in 400W or higher).


    Kony, aren't the power requirements (current at certain voltages) of
    a mobo fairly fixed? You seem to suggest it is not so.

    I had always thought that if I a mobo based on chipset X with a given
    Athlon processor (say a T'bred B) then the current at various
    voltages required to run this by most mobos on the market is pretty
    much the same.

    Is there a significant variation in voltages/current required?

    Is any such variation mainly due to the design of the mobo? Or is it
    mainly due to the choice of components (chipset and processor)?
  40. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "kony" <spam@spam.com> wrote in message
    news:eadtm0d5jj9l9l41pgv3gnhqlehdmrjcnt@4ax.com...
    > On Thu, 14 Oct 2004 15:49:37 GMT, Tom MacIntyre
    > <tom__macintyre@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>>14A of stable, clean power is enough for most basic systems.
    >>>It might not be sufficient for 6 drives PLUS a CPU using 12V
    >>>rail for power, nor adding a high-end modern video card, but
    >>>it would run any typical mid-grade system fine (if that 14A
    >>>were from a decent PSU).
    >>
    >>The CPU doesn't need the 12 VDC, does it?
    >>
    >>That is part of the problem with PS choice...the consideration must be
    >>made for amperage needs for all voltages, not just total power.
    >
    > Yes, modern P4 or Athlon 64 platforms and many (mostly
    > nForce2) Athlon XP do use 12V for CPU. The CPU power is
    > derived from 12V input by step down regulation. Any board
    > using 12V for CPU power will have the "Intel" 4-pin 12V
    > connector on it. When there is no 4-pin 12V input the odds
    > are overwhelming on a "PC" that it's using 5V for CPU power,
    > as did earlier Athlon & Pentium 3 'boards.

    I think you may be mistaken there. I have come across a number of boards
    that don't have the 4-pin connector, but still run the CPU off the 12v
    supply. The Albatron nf2 board is one that springs to mind.

    Chip
  41. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Thu, 14 Oct 2004 19:21:39 +0100, "Chip"
    <anneonymouse@virgin.net> wrote:


    >>>The CPU doesn't need the 12 VDC, does it?
    >>>
    >>>That is part of the problem with PS choice...the consideration must be
    >>>made for amperage needs for all voltages, not just total power.
    >>
    >> Yes, modern P4 or Athlon 64 platforms and many (mostly
    >> nForce2) Athlon XP do use 12V for CPU. The CPU power is
    >> derived from 12V input by step down regulation. Any board
    >> using 12V for CPU power will have the "Intel" 4-pin 12V
    >> connector on it. When there is no 4-pin 12V input the odds
    >> are overwhelming on a "PC" that it's using 5V for CPU power,
    >> as did earlier Athlon & Pentium 3 'boards.
    >
    >I think you may be mistaken there. I have come across a number of boards
    >that don't have the 4-pin connector, but still run the CPU off the 12v
    >supply. The Albatron nf2 board is one that springs to mind.

    Nope, then it uses 5V for CPU. What made you think it used
    12V? Measure it with a multimeter.

    If this is the Albatron you're referring to,
    http://www.amdboard.com/km18g-pro.jpg
    it clearly is only 2 phase VRM, 5V CPU power.

    If you have other boards in mind, supply link to a decent
    picture. There are definitely NONE from any remotely
    recognizable mainstream motherboard manufacturers, except
    those not traditionally considered "PC" boards... something
    using EPS 24 pin ATX or another deviation from the 20 pin
    ATX connector. The reason for this is that no competent
    designer will derive CPU power from a single 12V lead on the
    ATX 20-pin wiring harness.
  42. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "Chip" <anneonymouse@virgin.net> wrote in message news:<2t7c2mF1shd7gU1@uni-berlin.de>...

    "Qtec" - for example - are a very popular low-end
    > brand. You might refer to them as a no-name, but arguably they are one step
    > up from that. They produce a very popular 550w PSU.
    >
    > The first thing to note is that by 550w, they mean *Peak*. Which basically
    > means nothing at all.

    I didn't believe it until I visited their website. This has got to be
    the first time that a company has admitted that its most prominently
    advertised power rating was for peak power. Is it a sign of greater
    honesty, or of lower standards?

    Are you sure that Q-tec is a step above no-names? This picture of the
    insides of their 550W model: www.bit-tech.net/images/review/123/7.jpg
    Makes i seem more like a decent 250W.
  43. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Thu, 14 Oct 2004 18:21:50 +0100, Franklin
    <no_thanks@mail.com> wrote:

    >On 12 Oct 2004, kony wrote:
    >>
    >> Nexus relabels Sparkle PSU. If you can find a Sparkle (or
    >> Fortron) 350W for lower price it would be better value.
    >>
    >> 350W is enough for your system but if motherboard uses 12V
    >> for CPU (one sign of that would be that the board uses the
    >> "Intel" P4 4-pin 12V connector in addition to the ATX 20 pin
    >> connector) then it would provide more margin to choose 400W
    >> or higher (Nexus/Sparkle/Fortron will still be a good choice
    >> in 400W or higher).
    >
    >
    >Kony, aren't the power requirements (current at certain voltages) of
    >a mobo fairly fixed? You seem to suggest it is not so.

    No, the voltage may be constant but just like with a CPU,
    higher frequency causes higher current.


    >
    >I had always thought that if I a mobo based on chipset X with a given
    >Athlon processor (say a T'bred B) then the current at various
    >voltages required to run this by most mobos on the market is pretty
    >much the same.

    I don't understand what you're trying to say.

    >
    >Is there a significant variation in voltages/current required?
    >
    >Is any such variation mainly due to the design of the mobo? Or is it
    >mainly due to the choice of components (chipset and processor)?

    Any/all of these can vary current. One board may default
    memory to different voltage, another may be running at
    higher FSB speed, then the obvious things like chipset or
    processor count too... these differences could offset each
    other or add up to a signficant difference in some cases.
    Even so, the difference between one motherboard and another
    will often be much less than the difference between one CPU
    or another (if large enough frequency or voltage, core
    change), or comparing a budget video card to a high-end
    model, or number of hard drives.
  44. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "kony" <spam@spam.com> wrote in message
    news:tvitm09vdcmttobqj6ag8j0a5slu3airun@4ax.com...
    > On Thu, 14 Oct 2004 19:21:39 +0100, "Chip"
    > <anneonymouse@virgin.net> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>>>The CPU doesn't need the 12 VDC, does it?
    >>>>
    >>>>That is part of the problem with PS choice...the consideration must be
    >>>>made for amperage needs for all voltages, not just total power.
    >>>
    >>> Yes, modern P4 or Athlon 64 platforms and many (mostly
    >>> nForce2) Athlon XP do use 12V for CPU. The CPU power is
    >>> derived from 12V input by step down regulation. Any board
    >>> using 12V for CPU power will have the "Intel" 4-pin 12V
    >>> connector on it. When there is no 4-pin 12V input the odds
    >>> are overwhelming on a "PC" that it's using 5V for CPU power,
    >>> as did earlier Athlon & Pentium 3 'boards.
    >>
    >>I think you may be mistaken there. I have come across a number of boards
    >>that don't have the 4-pin connector, but still run the CPU off the 12v
    >>supply. The Albatron nf2 board is one that springs to mind.
    >
    > Nope, then it uses 5V for CPU. What made you think it used
    > 12V? Measure it with a multimeter.
    >
    > If this is the Albatron you're referring to,
    > http://www.amdboard.com/km18g-pro.jpg
    > it clearly is only 2 phase VRM, 5V CPU power.

    No, its not. As soon as I posted I thought perhaps on reflection it was not
    their nf2 board.

    >
    > If you have other boards in mind, supply link to a decent
    > picture.

    I will if I can find it. I specifically remember a review of an Albatron
    board where they were questioning the sanity of the designers not including
    the P4 connector on a 12V board. Perhaps it was the KT600 or KT880 board, I
    can't remember.

    > There are definitely NONE from any remotely
    > recognizable mainstream motherboard manufacturers, except
    > those not traditionally considered "PC" boards... something
    > using EPS 24 pin ATX or another deviation from the 20 pin
    > ATX connector. The reason for this is that no competent
    > designer will derive CPU power from a single 12V lead on the
    > ATX 20-pin wiring harness.

    Not so. See my comment above.

    Chip
  45. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Thu, 14 Oct 2004 20:27:25 +0100, "Chip"
    <anneonymouse@virgin.net> wrote:

    >
    >"kony" <spam@spam.com> wrote in message
    >news:tvitm09vdcmttobqj6ag8j0a5slu3airun@4ax.com...
    >> On Thu, 14 Oct 2004 19:21:39 +0100, "Chip"
    >> <anneonymouse@virgin.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>>>The CPU doesn't need the 12 VDC, does it?
    >>>>>
    >>>>>That is part of the problem with PS choice...the consideration must be
    >>>>>made for amperage needs for all voltages, not just total power.
    >>>>
    >>>> Yes, modern P4 or Athlon 64 platforms and many (mostly
    >>>> nForce2) Athlon XP do use 12V for CPU. The CPU power is
    >>>> derived from 12V input by step down regulation. Any board
    >>>> using 12V for CPU power will have the "Intel" 4-pin 12V
    >>>> connector on it. When there is no 4-pin 12V input the odds
    >>>> are overwhelming on a "PC" that it's using 5V for CPU power,
    >>>> as did earlier Athlon & Pentium 3 'boards.
    >>>
    >>>I think you may be mistaken there. I have come across a number of boards
    >>>that don't have the 4-pin connector, but still run the CPU off the 12v
    >>>supply. The Albatron nf2 board is one that springs to mind.
    >>
    >> Nope, then it uses 5V for CPU. What made you think it used
    >> 12V? Measure it with a multimeter.
    >>
    >> If this is the Albatron you're referring to,
    >> http://www.amdboard.com/km18g-pro.jpg
    >> it clearly is only 2 phase VRM, 5V CPU power.
    >
    >No, its not. As soon as I posted I thought perhaps on reflection it was not
    >their nf2 board.
    >
    >>
    >> If you have other boards in mind, supply link to a decent
    >> picture.
    >
    >I will if I can find it. I specifically remember a review of an Albatron
    >board where they were questioning the sanity of the designers not including
    >the P4 connector on a 12V board. Perhaps it was the KT600 or KT880 board, I
    >can't remember.

    Ah, but the thing is, reviewers are often kids who barely
    know what they're doing. Being "in print" doesn't make it
    factual... something you will understand better when you are
    older.


    >
    >> There are definitely NONE from any remotely
    >> recognizable mainstream motherboard manufacturers, except
    >> those not traditionally considered "PC" boards... something
    >> using EPS 24 pin ATX or another deviation from the 20 pin
    >> ATX connector. The reason for this is that no competent
    >> designer will derive CPU power from a single 12V lead on the
    >> ATX 20-pin wiring harness.
    >
    >Not so. See my comment above.

    To be kind, you have assumed something that isn't true, or
    trusted someone (a reviewer?) who is clueless. Some
    reviewers I've corresponded with just don't have enough
    experience to realize that even though AMD's later design
    guides recommend 12V for CPU power, that doesn't mean all
    motherboard manufacturers do so. They are headstrong and
    foolish to never bother testing their theories, or bothering
    to take voltage measurements.

    There are no brand name boards having _ONLY_ 20 pin ATX
    conn. that use 12V for CPU. If you do find a clueless
    reviewer that claims differently, be sure to keep looking at
    other reviews of the same motherboard before trusting a
    reviewer who is in error.

    I seriously doubt that even an unknown very poor generic
    board manufacturer would have an engineer competent enough
    to get any motherboard working, but would make the mistake
    of trying to power CPU by 12V without 2nd 12V input, whether
    it be from a 24 pin connector or 2nd, 4-pin connector or
    something less common/proprietary.
  46. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    "kony" <spam@spam.com> wrote in message
    news:tvitm09vdcmttobqj6ag8j0a5slu3airun@4ax.com...
    > On Thu, 14 Oct 2004 19:21:39 +0100, "Chip"
    > <anneonymouse@virgin.net> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>>>The CPU doesn't need the 12 VDC, does it?
    >>>>
    >>>>That is part of the problem with PS choice...the consideration must be
    >>>>made for amperage needs for all voltages, not just total power.
    >>>
    >>> Yes, modern P4 or Athlon 64 platforms and many (mostly
    >>> nForce2) Athlon XP do use 12V for CPU. The CPU power is
    >>> derived from 12V input by step down regulation. Any board
    >>> using 12V for CPU power will have the "Intel" 4-pin 12V
    >>> connector on it. When there is no 4-pin 12V input the odds
    >>> are overwhelming on a "PC" that it's using 5V for CPU power,
    >>> as did earlier Athlon & Pentium 3 'boards.
    >>
    >>I think you may be mistaken there. I have come across a number of boards
    >>that don't have the 4-pin connector, but still run the CPU off the 12v
    >>supply. The Albatron nf2 board is one that springs to mind.
    >
    > Nope, then it uses 5V for CPU. What made you think it used
    > 12V? Measure it with a multimeter.
    >
    > If this is the Albatron you're referring to,
    > http://www.amdboard.com/km18g-pro.jpg
    > it clearly is only 2 phase VRM, 5V CPU power.

    When you say "clearly", how can you be clear that its 5V CPU power? I can
    see how you can deduce whether its two or three phase, but how can you tell
    its a 5v design?

    Chip
  47. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,sci.electronics.components,sci.electronics.repair,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    On Thu, 14 Oct 2004 20:46:05 +0100, "Chip"
    <anneonymouse@virgin.net> wrote:

    >
    >"kony" <spam@spam.com> wrote in message
    >news:tvitm09vdcmttobqj6ag8j0a5slu3airun@4ax.com...
    >> On Thu, 14 Oct 2004 19:21:39 +0100, "Chip"
    >> <anneonymouse@virgin.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>>>The CPU doesn't need the 12 VDC, does it?
    >>>>>
    >>>>>That is part of the problem with PS choice...the consideration must be
    >>>>>made for amperage needs for all voltages, not just total power.
    >>>>
    >>>> Yes, modern P4 or Athlon 64 platforms and many (mostly
    >>>> nForce2) Athlon XP do use 12V for CPU. The CPU power is
    >>>> derived from 12V input by step down regulation. Any board
    >>>> using 12V for CPU power will have the "Intel" 4-pin 12V
    >>>> connector on it. When there is no 4-pin 12V input the odds
    >>>> are overwhelming on a "PC" that it's using 5V for CPU power,
    >>>> as did earlier Athlon & Pentium 3 'boards.
    >>>
    >>>I think you may be mistaken there. I have come across a number of boards
    >>>that don't have the 4-pin connector, but still run the CPU off the 12v
    >>>supply. The Albatron nf2 board is one that springs to mind.
    >>
    >> Nope, then it uses 5V for CPU. What made you think it used
    >> 12V? Measure it with a multimeter.
    >>
    >> If this is the Albatron you're referring to,
    >> http://www.amdboard.com/km18g-pro.jpg
    >> it clearly is only 2 phase VRM, 5V CPU power.
    >
    >When you say "clearly", how can you be clear that its 5V CPU power? I can
    >see how you can deduce whether its two or three phase, but how can you tell
    >its a 5v design?


    Because of the amperage needed plus the 2 phase design,
    there is not enough V margin for using 3V, and there isn't
    sufficient supply line for 12V. There are no other
    high-current rails on a PC power supply.

    Then again there's experience, I get bored with same old
    plug-part-A-in-slot-B, and hack away at boards just for the
    heck of it, haven't had a board in years that I didn't take
    voltage measurements on. You start to notice these things
    after a while, and then there's overclocking... for extreme
    overclocking on an Athlon board that uses 5V for CPU it may
    be necessary to suppliment the power plane with a jumper
    wire (among other things), as example:
    http://69.36.189.159/usr_1034/M7NCG_5V_Mod.jpg
  48. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    (irrelevant newsgroups removed)

    none wrote:
    > On Tue, 12 Oct 2004 23:05:23 GMT, "DaveW" <none@zero.org> wrote:
    >
    >> Hmmm ... I think you should more seriously be thinking about an
    >> Antec 550 Watt True Power supply.
    >
    > With that many Hd's I'd be thinking about dedicating one good psu to
    > the motherboard and the optical drives/floppy and using separate
    > supplies for alll those Hd's.(maybe 2 drives to a psu rated at at
    > least 350-400 watts.)

    Umm, wha? That's complete overkill. A high-end drive ideally likes to eat
    about 40W spinning up IIRC (mostly on the 12V line), so you'd have about 3A
    per drive peak on the 12V line. For any halfway reasonable, or even
    completely useless, PSUs you should be able to fit 3 drives/PSU, and
    probably 4 or 5 if it's a reasonable one. 20A on the 12V line (with the rest
    of the lines essentially unloaded) should be sufficient to power up all 6
    drives. Also, if the drives are designed to delay spin-up when they're the
    secondary drive, you should be able to handle double the number of drives
    per PSU (ie: 6 drives if you've got ~10A available on the 12V line).

    Incidentally, does anyone know how many "normal" SATA controllers implement
    sequential spin-up?

    > Depends on what type of computing you'll doing and how intensive too.

    This is irrelevant to how many you can run off a single PSU. Power usage for
    even high-end drives is below 10W mark (usally <400mA on 12V, <1A on 5V)
    while operating, so you could have all six drives running off a PSU that's
    only capable of 3A on the 12V line (though of course they won't have a hope
    of spinning up ...).

    --
    Michael Brown
    www.emboss.co.nz : OOS/RSI software and more :)
    Add michael@ to emboss.co.nz - My inbox is always open
  49. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd,alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt (More info?)

    Chip wrote:
    [...]
    > No. Its 14A. Read it and weep. 14A.
    >
    > It wouldn't power my laptop.

    Damn, you must have short battery life on that laptop :)

    --
    Michael Brown
    www.emboss.co.nz : OOS/RSI software and more :)
    Add michael@ to emboss.co.nz - My inbox is always open
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