Mobile XP's

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

I have probably asked this question sometime here in the last few days

it will be burried amongst the threads now so sorry if i am duplicating a
question (im sure that happens alot on usenet)

But can mobile Athlon XP's with an unlocked multiplier be used on a standard
socket A board? and with a standard AMD stock heatsink?

plus would you reccomend OC'in it with a standard AMD heatsink i got with my
locked 2600+ XP

I have a few case fans and my case is massive, airflow is excellent

and my PSU has 2 fans that keeps things cool (when fan is on full power)

--
Thanks,

Chris.
17 answers Last reply
More about mobile
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    "Christo" <chris@juststuff.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:2usrjsF27mtolU1@uni-berlin.de...

    " ...can mobile Athlon XP's with an unlocked multiplier be used on a
    standard socket A board? "

    You need the ability to adjust the multiplier and FSB in increments, either
    through the BIOS or on-the-fly in Windows. If you can't do either, then
    your XP-M may only run at a very low default multiplier. What motherboard
    and RAM do you have?


    " ...would you reccomend OC'in it with a standard AMD heatsink i got with
    my locked 2600+ XP "

    You'll be OK up to a certain level, but you'll get better results with
    something more substantial. Don't expect to get 2.5Ghz with a standard AMD
    heatsink.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    What is the standard socket A board (via 266, via 333, via 400, nvidia
    nforce 2, ect.)?
    I would not recommend using a standard AMD stock heat sink for overclocking
    unless you don't plan on raising the cpu core voltage.
    If you use a standard AMD heat sink, overclock the processor, and increase
    the core voltage you will have to watch the temperatures closely.
    The AMD heat sink will not dissipate enough heat to keep the cpu stable in
    an over voltage environment. Most AMD heat sink will provide about 0.5 to
    0.55 C/W. At 80 watts that's a temperature differential of 44°C
    (0.55x80=44) over the case temperature. At 90 watts that's a temperature
    differential of 49.5°C over the case temperature. Assuming a well
    ventilated case ambient temperature of 26°CO and a case temperature of 30­°C
    to 32°C that adds up to 76°C (32+44=76) on the cpu at 80 watts. At 90 watts
    you will have a cpu temperature of 81.5°C. The max temperature for the cpu
    is about 90°C. At 45 watts the cpu temperature is 56.75°C. You really need
    a heat sink that is rated at 0.4 C/W or less to keep the cpu stable when
    overclocking and the better heat sinks are rated around 0.3 C/W. These are
    not motherboard temperature cpu sensor numbers. These are core temperature
    numbers. The mother board cpu sensors are generally 6°C to 10°C less due to
    calibration and placement of the sensor. Simple calculation for power in
    watts, power = voltage x current.

    I am sure that you have seen this before.
    http://www.overclockers.com/articles373/

    "Christo" <chris@juststuff.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:2usrjsF27mtolU1@uni-berlin.de...
    >I have probably asked this question sometime here in the last few days
    >
    > it will be burried amongst the threads now so sorry if i am duplicating a
    > question (im sure that happens alot on usenet)
    >
    > But can mobile Athlon XP's with an unlocked multiplier be used on a
    > standard socket A board? and with a standard AMD stock heatsink?
    >
    > plus would you reccomend OC'in it with a standard AMD heatsink i got with
    > my locked 2600+ XP
    >
    > I have a few case fans and my case is massive, airflow is excellent
    >
    > and my PSU has 2 fans that keeps things cool (when fan is on full power)
    >
    > --
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Chris.
    >
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    "Cuzman" <cuzNOSPAM@supanet.com> wrote in message
    news:2ut495F2faiq6U1@uni-berlin.de...
    > "Christo" <chris@juststuff.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:2usrjsF27mtolU1@uni-berlin.de...
    >
    > " ...can mobile Athlon XP's with an unlocked multiplier be used on a
    > standard socket A board? "
    >
    > You need the ability to adjust the multiplier and FSB in increments,
    > either
    > through the BIOS or on-the-fly in Windows. If you can't do either, then
    > your XP-M may only run at a very low default multiplier. What motherboard
    > and RAM do you have?
    >
    >
    > " ...would you reccomend OC'in it with a standard AMD heatsink i got with
    > my locked 2600+ XP "
    >
    > You'll be OK up to a certain level, but you'll get better results with
    > something more substantial. Don't expect to get 2.5Ghz with a standard
    > AMD
    > heatsink.
    >
    >


    ABIT NF7 v2.0 DDR333 PC2700
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    >
    >
    > ABIT NF7 v2.0 DDR333 PC2700

    The NF7 will run a mobile fine. The only minor issue is that the stock
    BIOS will not recognise it and will show 'Unknown CPU type' at POST,
    you will also have to manually configure the multiplier and FSB the
    first time you start up.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    Bigbadger wrote:
    >> ABIT NF7 v2.0 DDR333 PC2700
    >
    > The NF7 will run a mobile fine. The only minor issue is that the stock
    > BIOS will not recognise it and will show 'Unknown CPU type' at POST,
    > you will also have to manually configure the multiplier and FSB the
    > first time you start up.

    also note that nf7 with amd mobile doens't like it too much if you change
    multi, fsb, and cpu core voltage at the same time (no boot, needing cmos
    clear)
    it works ok if you change cpu voltage first, then change multi/fsb
    *shrug*
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    "Christo" <chris@juststuff.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:2ut9cbF2fj9skU1@uni-berlin.de...

    " ABIT NF7 v2.0 DDR333 PC2700 "


    With PC2700 you can only guarantee 166Mhz times your multiplier, which
    limits your overclock considerably. Anything over 166Mhz is a bonus, but
    you'll need at least PC3200, or preferably PC3500 or PC3700 to reach its
    full potential.
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    "Cuzman" <cuzNOSPAM@supanet.com> wrote in message
    news:2uuh0eF2galg7U1@uni-berlin.de...
    > "Christo" <chris@juststuff.co.uk> wrote in message
    > news:2ut9cbF2fj9skU1@uni-berlin.de...
    >
    > " ABIT NF7 v2.0 DDR333 PC2700 "
    >
    >
    > With PC2700 you can only guarantee 166Mhz times your multiplier, which
    > limits your overclock considerably. Anything over 166Mhz is a bonus, but
    > you'll need at least PC3200, or preferably PC3500 or PC3700 to reach its
    > full potential.

    Agree about the PC3200 comment.

    PC3500 or PC3700 are usually more expensive not worth it. If you get good
    3200, its probably the same chips anyway.

    Chip
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    "Bigbadger" <Big_badger@btinternet.com> wrote in message
    news:84557bb8.0411032233.711f336@posting.google.com...
    >>
    >>
    >> ABIT NF7 v2.0 DDR333 PC2700
    >
    > The NF7 will run a mobile fine. The only minor issue is that the stock
    > BIOS will not recognise it and will show 'Unknown CPU type' at POST,
    > you will also have to manually configure the multiplier and FSB the
    > first time you start up.

    no worries i just recently updated with flashmenu got bios 26, believe i was
    on 25 when the board arrived.

    and as for the FSB etc,

    would you reccomend starting at 11x166?

    with a vcore of about 1.6 ish
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    The PC3200 needs to be cas 2.5 or cas 2.0 and the cas 2.0 ram will allow you
    a little head room.
    The PC2700 that you have maybe able to run at 400Mhz depending upon the
    original cas latency. If the original cas latency at 333Mhz was 3.0 it is
    not likely that the ram will run at 400Mhz, but if the cas is 2.5 at 333Mhz
    you could raise it 3.0 and increase the other three latencies to something
    like 3 3 11 or 4 4 11. Also you may need to increase the ram voltage to
    2.8v.

    The Merlin modified bios (D25_Cpc_On_rev.3D_by_-=Merlin=-.zip) will
    recognize the mobile amd and helps with some stability issues at higher
    clock speeds. Another good one is the tictac bios
    (d24_3d_4227_d10bpl.bin.zip). Both of these modified bios's will give you
    the 10.5 multiplier if you need it.

    1. Start at 10x166 them increase the FSB until you reach the highest FSB the
    ram will run at, you may want to set the ram at cas 3, (4 4 11) and a
    voltage of 2.7 to 2.8. This will let you know how far the DDR2700 ram will
    go.
    2. then back down the FSB back to 166 and increase the multiplier to 11,
    slowly increase the FSB until you reach the limit of the ram or cpu which
    ever comes first.
    3. If you reach the limit of the ram before the processor then repeat step 2
    with 11.5. If you reach the limit for the cpu the back down the multiplier
    to 10.5.
    4. Leave the voltage at the lowest possible setting to start 1.525v or 1.55v
    and then increase it in small steps to maintain stability during both steps
    1 & 2. Remember that the higher the cpu voltage the more heat that cpu will
    generate and the more power it will draw. Watch your temps and 12+ voltage
    rails.

    You need to know how far you can push the ram before you start to push the
    processor. The ram DDR2700 will be the limiting factor. No two system will
    respond the same and you will have to find the best setting for your ram,
    cpu, and video.

    I hope this helps.

    "Christo" <chris@juststuff.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:2uuodbF2fu2t6U1@uni-berlin.de...
    >
    > "Bigbadger" <Big_badger@btinternet.com> wrote in message
    > news:84557bb8.0411032233.711f336@posting.google.com...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> ABIT NF7 v2.0 DDR333 PC2700
    >>
    >> The NF7 will run a mobile fine. The only minor issue is that the stock
    >> BIOS will not recognise it and will show 'Unknown CPU type' at POST,
    >> you will also have to manually configure the multiplier and FSB the
    >> first time you start up.
    >
    > no worries i just recently updated with flashmenu got bios 26, believe i
    > was on 25 when the board arrived.
    >
    > and as for the FSB etc,
    >
    > would you reccomend starting at 11x166?
    >
    > with a vcore of about 1.6 ish
    >
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    "Christo" <chris@juststuff.co.uk> wrote in message news:<2uuodbF2fu2t6U1@uni-berlin.de>...
    > "Bigbadger" <Big_badger@btinternet.com> wrote in message
    > news:84557bb8.0411032233.711f336@posting.google.com...
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> ABIT NF7 v2.0 DDR333 PC2700
    > >
    > > The NF7 will run a mobile fine. The only minor issue is that the stock
    > > BIOS will not recognise it and will show 'Unknown CPU type' at POST,
    > > you will also have to manually configure the multiplier and FSB the
    > > first time you start up.
    >
    > no worries i just recently updated with flashmenu got bios 26, believe i was
    > on 25 when the board arrived.
    >
    > and as for the FSB etc,
    >
    > would you reccomend starting at 11x166?
    >
    > with a vcore of about 1.6 ish

    If it were me I'd set it up at 13 x 166 @ 1.65 V to start with ....
    You should be able to go higher on all settings but around 2200MHz
    clock speed and desktop default vooltage is a good starting point.
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    Mines running just fine on a NF7-S 2,0 at 2.5ghz :0

    Using pc3200 ram but.


    On Wed, 03 Nov 2004 23:17:11 GMT, "Rusty" <rlsmith004@sbcglobal.net>
    wrote:

    >What is the standard socket A board (via 266, via 333, via 400, nvidia
    >nforce 2, ect.)?
    >I would not recommend using a standard AMD stock heat sink for overclocking
    >unless you don't plan on raising the cpu core voltage.
    >If you use a standard AMD heat sink, overclock the processor, and increase
    >the core voltage you will have to watch the temperatures closely.
    >The AMD heat sink will not dissipate enough heat to keep the cpu stable in
    >an over voltage environment. Most AMD heat sink will provide about 0.5 to
    >0.55 C/W. At 80 watts that's a temperature differential of 44°C
    >(0.55x80=44) over the case temperature. At 90 watts that's a temperature
    >differential of 49.5°C over the case temperature. Assuming a well
    >ventilated case ambient temperature of 26°CO and a case temperature of 30­°C
    >to 32°C that adds up to 76°C (32+44=76) on the cpu at 80 watts. At 90 watts
    >you will have a cpu temperature of 81.5°C. The max temperature for the cpu
    >is about 90°C. At 45 watts the cpu temperature is 56.75°C. You really need
    >a heat sink that is rated at 0.4 C/W or less to keep the cpu stable when
    >overclocking and the better heat sinks are rated around 0.3 C/W. These are
    >not motherboard temperature cpu sensor numbers. These are core temperature
    >numbers. The mother board cpu sensors are generally 6°C to 10°C less due to
    >calibration and placement of the sensor. Simple calculation for power in
    >watts, power = voltage x current.
    >
    >I am sure that you have seen this before.
    >http://www.overclockers.com/articles373/
    >
    >"Christo" <chris@juststuff.co.uk> wrote in message
    >news:2usrjsF27mtolU1@uni-berlin.de...
    >>I have probably asked this question sometime here in the last few days
    >>
    >> it will be burried amongst the threads now so sorry if i am duplicating a
    >> question (im sure that happens alot on usenet)
    >>
    >> But can mobile Athlon XP's with an unlocked multiplier be used on a
    >> standard socket A board? and with a standard AMD stock heatsink?
    >>
    >> plus would you reccomend OC'in it with a standard AMD heatsink i got with
    >> my locked 2600+ XP
    >>
    >> I have a few case fans and my case is massive, airflow is excellent
    >>
    >> and my PSU has 2 fans that keeps things cool (when fan is on full power)
    >>
    >> --
    >> Thanks,
    >>
    >> Chris.
    >>
    >
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    Never said it couldn't be done it all depends on the ambient temperatures
    and how well the cpu you have is put together.
    The C/W values for heat sink are based on the physical laws of thermal
    dynamics. What your cpu will do in reference to the thermal properties of
    the cpu will vary from cpu to cpu and from batch to batch. Sounds like your
    cpu will run at lower voltages and requires less power to do it. Be willing
    to bet that not all Mobil AMD will OC that well on a boxed AMD aluminum heat
    sink and fan combination. All AMD Mobil's are OEM and do not come with a
    fan. I assume that you are using a solid aluminum stock AMD boxed heat sink
    and fan and your case temp's are below 30°C. AMD does box some of it's
    cpu's with copper core heat sinks, which one do you have? It makes a
    difference. I believe the copper core heat sinks have a value of about 0.42
    C/W to 0.45 C/W. If you add 8°C to the thermal cpu reading from the bios
    and run the burn in wizard on the Sisoftware Sandra software v2004.SP2b for
    20 iterations you should be able to figure it out.
    That should tell you just how fine it really is. The destruction from heat
    does not always show up immediately it could take months for the you to see
    the damage. It first appears as memory errors as the cpu writes data out of
    the L1 and L2 cache from the cpu to the ram. I know from experience. Some
    times you can salvage the cpu and some time you can't.

    "Its JUST ME!!!" <1@2.com> wrote in message
    news:nhiko056u73ka2a0c5kppjcdm4pgd9m778@4ax.com...
    >
    >
    >
    > Mines running just fine on a NF7-S 2,0 at 2.5ghz :0
    >
    > Using pc3200 ram but.
    >
    >
    > On Wed, 03 Nov 2004 23:17:11 GMT, "Rusty" <rlsmith004@sbcglobal.net>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>What is the standard socket A board (via 266, via 333, via 400, nvidia
    >>nforce 2, ect.)?
    >>I would not recommend using a standard AMD stock heat sink for
    >>overclocking
    >>unless you don't plan on raising the cpu core voltage.
    >>If you use a standard AMD heat sink, overclock the processor, and increase
    >>the core voltage you will have to watch the temperatures closely.
    >>The AMD heat sink will not dissipate enough heat to keep the cpu stable in
    >>an over voltage environment. Most AMD heat sink will provide about 0.5 to
    >>0.55 C/W. At 80 watts that's a temperature differential of 44°C
    >>(0.55x80=44) over the case temperature. At 90 watts that's a temperature
    >>differential of 49.5°C over the case temperature. Assuming a well
    >>ventilated case ambient temperature of 26°CO and a case temperature of
    >>30­°C
    >>to 32°C that adds up to 76°C (32+44=76) on the cpu at 80 watts. At 90
    >>watts
    >>you will have a cpu temperature of 81.5°C. The max temperature for the
    >>cpu
    >>is about 90°C. At 45 watts the cpu temperature is 56.75°C. You really
    >>need
    >>a heat sink that is rated at 0.4 C/W or less to keep the cpu stable when
    >>overclocking and the better heat sinks are rated around 0.3 C/W. These
    >>are
    >>not motherboard temperature cpu sensor numbers. These are core
    >>temperature
    >>numbers. The mother board cpu sensors are generally 6°C to 10°C less due
    >>to
    >>calibration and placement of the sensor. Simple calculation for power in
    >>watts, power = voltage x current.
    >>
    >>I am sure that you have seen this before.
    >>http://www.overclockers.com/articles373/
    >>
    >>"Christo" <chris@juststuff.co.uk> wrote in message
    >>news:2usrjsF27mtolU1@uni-berlin.de...
    >>>I have probably asked this question sometime here in the last few days
    >>>
    >>> it will be burried amongst the threads now so sorry if i am duplicating
    >>> a
    >>> question (im sure that happens alot on usenet)
    >>>
    >>> But can mobile Athlon XP's with an unlocked multiplier be used on a
    >>> standard socket A board? and with a standard AMD stock heatsink?
    >>>
    >>> plus would you reccomend OC'in it with a standard AMD heatsink i got
    >>> with
    >>> my locked 2600+ XP
    >>>
    >>> I have a few case fans and my case is massive, airflow is excellent
    >>>
    >>> and my PSU has 2 fans that keeps things cool (when fan is on full power)
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Thanks,
    >>>
    >>> Chris.
    >>>
    >>
    >
  13. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    "Its JUST ME!!!" <1@2.com> wrote in message
    news:nhiko056u73ka2a0c5kppjcdm4pgd9m778@4ax.com...
    >
    >
    >
    > Mines running just fine on a NF7-S 2,0 at 2.5ghz :0
    >
    > Using pc3200 ram but.
    >
    >
    > On Wed, 03 Nov 2004 23:17:11 GMT, "Rusty" <rlsmith004@sbcglobal.net>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>What is the standard socket A board (via 266, via 333, via 400, nvidia
    >>nforce 2, ect.)?
    >>I would not recommend using a standard AMD stock heat sink for
    >>overclocking
    >>unless you don't plan on raising the cpu core voltage.
    >>If you use a standard AMD heat sink, overclock the processor, and increase
    >>the core voltage you will have to watch the temperatures closely.
    >>The AMD heat sink will not dissipate enough heat to keep the cpu stable in
    >>an over voltage environment. Most AMD heat sink will provide about 0.5 to
    >>0.55 C/W. At 80 watts that's a temperature differential of 44°C
    >>(0.55x80=44) over the case temperature. At 90 watts that's a temperature
    >>differential of 49.5°C over the case temperature. Assuming a well
    >>ventilated case ambient temperature of 26°CO and a case temperature of
    >>30­°C
    >>to 32°C that adds up to 76°C (32+44=76) on the cpu at 80 watts. At 90
    >>watts
    >>you will have a cpu temperature of 81.5°C. The max temperature for the
    >>cpu
    >>is about 90°C. At 45 watts the cpu temperature is 56.75°C. You really
    >>need
    >>a heat sink that is rated at 0.4 C/W or less to keep the cpu stable when
    >>overclocking and the better heat sinks are rated around 0.3 C/W. These
    >>are
    >>not motherboard temperature cpu sensor numbers. These are core
    >>temperature
    >>numbers. The mother board cpu sensors are generally 6°C to 10°C less due
    >>to
    >>calibration and placement of the sensor. Simple calculation for power in
    >>watts, power = voltage x current.
    >>
    >>I am sure that you have seen this before.
    >>http://www.overclockers.com/articles373/
    >>
    >>"Christo" <chris@juststuff.co.uk> wrote in message
    >>news:2usrjsF27mtolU1@uni-berlin.de...
    >>>I have probably asked this question sometime here in the last few days
    >>>
    >>> it will be burried amongst the threads now so sorry if i am duplicating
    >>> a
    >>> question (im sure that happens alot on usenet)
    >>>
    >>> But can mobile Athlon XP's with an unlocked multiplier be used on a
    >>> standard socket A board? and with a standard AMD stock heatsink?
    >>>
    >>> plus would you reccomend OC'in it with a standard AMD heatsink i got
    >>> with
    >>> my locked 2600+ XP
    >>>
    >>> I have a few case fans and my case is massive, airflow is excellent
    >>>
    >>> and my PSU has 2 fans that keeps things cool (when fan is on full power)
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Thanks,
    >>>
    >>> Chris.
    >>>
    >>
    >
    What are you multiplier and fsb settings ? I just got my abit nf7-s and
    2400 mobile. Right now im running at 210 fsb X 11 @ 1.60 . My ram timings
    are at the default i think.
    2.5 kingston is what I have, 3200 ddr.

    TIA
  14. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    "lonesw0rdsman" <geo@neo.net> wrote in message
    news:KHQld.1911$qS4.285@trnddc09...
    >
    > "Its JUST ME!!!" <1@2.com> wrote in message
    > news:nhiko056u73ka2a0c5kppjcdm4pgd9m778@4ax.com...
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Mines running just fine on a NF7-S 2,0 at 2.5ghz :0
    >>
    >> Using pc3200 ram but.
    >>
    >>
    >> On Wed, 03 Nov 2004 23:17:11 GMT, "Rusty" <rlsmith004@sbcglobal.net>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>What is the standard socket A board (via 266, via 333, via 400, nvidia
    >>>nforce 2, ect.)?
    >>>I would not recommend using a standard AMD stock heat sink for
    >>>overclocking
    >>>unless you don't plan on raising the cpu core voltage.
    >>>If you use a standard AMD heat sink, overclock the processor, and
    >>>increase
    >>>the core voltage you will have to watch the temperatures closely.
    >>>The AMD heat sink will not dissipate enough heat to keep the cpu stable
    >>>in
    >>>an over voltage environment. Most AMD heat sink will provide about 0.5
    >>>to
    >>>0.55 C/W. At 80 watts that's a temperature differential of 44°C
    >>>(0.55x80=44) over the case temperature. At 90 watts that's a temperature
    >>>differential of 49.5°C over the case temperature. Assuming a well
    >>>ventilated case ambient temperature of 26°CO and a case temperature of
    >>>30­°C
    >>>to 32°C that adds up to 76°C (32+44=76) on the cpu at 80 watts. At 90
    >>>watts
    >>>you will have a cpu temperature of 81.5°C. The max temperature for the
    >>>cpu
    >>>is about 90°C. At 45 watts the cpu temperature is 56.75°C. You really
    >>>need
    >>>a heat sink that is rated at 0.4 C/W or less to keep the cpu stable when
    >>>overclocking and the better heat sinks are rated around 0.3 C/W. These
    >>>are
    >>>not motherboard temperature cpu sensor numbers. These are core
    >>>temperature
    >>>numbers. The mother board cpu sensors are generally 6°C to 10°C less due
    >>>to
    >>>calibration and placement of the sensor. Simple calculation for power in
    >>>watts, power = voltage x current.
    >>>
    >>>I am sure that you have seen this before.
    >>>http://www.overclockers.com/articles373/
    >>>
    >>>"Christo" <chris@juststuff.co.uk> wrote in message
    >>>news:2usrjsF27mtolU1@uni-berlin.de...
    >>>>I have probably asked this question sometime here in the last few days
    >>>>
    >>>> it will be burried amongst the threads now so sorry if i am duplicating
    >>>> a
    >>>> question (im sure that happens alot on usenet)
    >>>>
    >>>> But can mobile Athlon XP's with an unlocked multiplier be used on a
    >>>> standard socket A board? and with a standard AMD stock heatsink?
    >>>>
    >>>> plus would you reccomend OC'in it with a standard AMD heatsink i got
    >>>> with
    >>>> my locked 2600+ XP
    >>>>
    >>>> I have a few case fans and my case is massive, airflow is excellent
    >>>>
    >>>> and my PSU has 2 fans that keeps things cool (when fan is on full
    >>>> power)
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> Thanks,
    >>>>
    >>>> Chris.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>
    > What are you multiplier and fsb settings ? I just got my abit nf7-s and
    > 2400 mobile. Right now im running at 210 fsb X 11 @ 1.60 . My ram timings
    > are at the default i think.
    > 2.5 kingston is what I have, 3200 ddr.
    >
    > TIA

    I think the convention is to post your comment/question underneath the text
    to which it relates. I know "Its Just Me" screwed it up by top-posting.
    (When will these people learn?????!?!??!) But even so, it took me a while
    to work out just who you were asking.

    Chip
  15. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    You want whom to learn what???

    I wonder when those glorious bottom-posters like you will learn to snip the
    previous posting so that you can see their reply on the same page.
    I'm pretty sure that was the reason why top posting started.

    And yes, I do top-posting and am able to read and understand threads in
    top-posting style.

    JS

    On Mon, 15 Nov 2004 09:16:53 -0000, "Chip" <anneonymouse@virgin.net> wrote:
    <snip>

    >I think the convention is to post your comment/question underneath the text
    >to which it relates. I know "Its Just Me" screwed it up by top-posting.
    >(When will these people learn?????!?!??!) But even so, it took me a while
    >to work out just who you were asking.
    >
    >Chip
    >

    ---------------------------------------------
    LWFF Ball Bearing conversion at:
    http://jensschumi<dot>bravepages<dot>com/

    GPLRank: -14.82
    Monsters of GPL: sub 95
  16. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    On Sat, 20 Nov 2004 00:16:17 -0500, FritzTheCat wrote:

    > Not exactly authoritative is it?
    >
    > And the referenced RFC is ancient and has a status of "informational".
    >
    > Not mandatory, not recommended. In fact hardly an RFC at all.
    >
    > Only wienies let their common sense be overuled by those without the
    > capability of original thought.
    >
    And only idiots quote the sig line of the person they are responding to.
    And of course, most of these people top post too. Since you seem to fall
    into this catagory I guess it's beyond you to search the subject itself,
    so here's a link for you. Maybe you'll find out what you want out of one
    of these links. Make sure you read all of them.:-)

    http://search.yahoo.com/search?p=top+posting&sm=Yahoo%21+Search&fr=FP-tab-web-t&toggle=1

    Results 1 - 10 of about 14,200,000 for top posting - 0.12 sec

    --
    Abit KT7-Raid (KT133) Tbred B core CPU @2400MHz (24x100FSB)
    http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm
  17. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    "jakesnake66" <jake@lycos.com> wrote in message
    news:cdLnd.16161$sk2.5154@fe2.columbus.rr.com...

    [snip]

    > Count me in.
    >
    > jakesnake
    >

    Excellent! A triumph for common-sense and reasonableness.

    Sir, I salute you.

    Chip
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