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akasa socket A heatsink won't fit, and doesn't meet specif..

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Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
November 8, 2004 11:35:48 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

I bought an Akasa AK824 HSF for the AMD XP 3000+. The strange thing
is that the step is almost non-existant, it is the correct length of
10mm, but it is less than 1mm in depth. That is not deep enough to
step over the plastic thing that says "Socket 462". My other socket A
heatsinks (on other computers) step over it fine, their steps are
between 2-3mm in depth.

After emailing akasa, saying that a step of less than 1mm isn't right.
He said it was right.

in AMD's document
http://www.amd.com/us-en/assets/content_type/white_pape...
it says that the step has to be 2mm

Also, would any record cleaning or vcr cleaning fluid do in place of
isopropyl alcohol 99% for cleaning a heatsink and processor?
And would the cloth from a glasses case or any lens cloth be low lint
enough?
November 9, 2004 9:20:18 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

"James Hanley" <jameshanley39@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
news:930a4bf.0411082035.2734a243@posting.google.com...
>
> Also, would any record cleaning or vcr cleaning fluid do in place of
> isopropyl alcohol 99% for cleaning a heatsink and processor?
> And would the cloth from a glasses case or any lens cloth be low lint
> enough?

Actually, automotive brake cleaner (Ethyl benzene, xylene type), some carb
cleaners (xylene, methyl alcohol, acetone type) will work, do not use
products that contain detergent or petroleum distillates like engine
cleaners. Do not use these products on the pcb of the processor just the
core and the heat sink. I believe vcr cleaning fluid contains some inert
products and is not 99% isopropyl more like 70 something. Acetone can be
used, but you must be careful not to pour it on the pcb, use a damp cloth or
coffee filter to clean the processor. Acetone has a much lower flash point
than alcohol, so don't light up. You can find 99% acetone at you local
hardware store. It's used as a paint thinner. Coffee filters make a great
lint free cloth and they are great for cleaning lens.
November 9, 2004 11:19:13 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

jameshanley39@yahoo.co.uk (James Hanley) wrote in message news:<930a4bf.0411082035.2734a243@posting.google.com>...
> I bought an Akasa AK824 HSF for the AMD XP 3000+. The strange thing
> is that the step is almost non-existant, it is the correct length of
> 10mm, but it is less than 1mm in depth. That is not deep enough to
> step over the plastic thing that says "Socket 462". My other socket A
> heatsinks (on other computers) step over it fine, their steps are
> between 2-3mm in depth.
>
> After emailing akasa, saying that a step of less than 1mm isn't right.
> He said it was right.
>
> in AMD's document
> http://www.amd.com/us-en/assets/content_type/white_pape...
> it says that the step has to be 2mm
>
> Also, would any record cleaning or vcr cleaning fluid do in place of
> isopropyl alcohol 99% for cleaning a heatsink and processor?
> And would the cloth from a glasses case or any lens cloth be low lint
> enough?

Just took a quick look at all of my loose heatsinks (5). All have
steps that are less than 1mm, barely so but less. I don't have any
problems. They've all been installed at one time or another but none
touch the ledge on the socket. Don't know why you are having
clearence problems.

If I were you I'd put some cheap silcone thermal compound on the ledge
and the lip, not for thermal properties (LOL) but to see where you are
getting contact problems. It cleans up easily and you can't hurt
anything. Afterwards, use a Dremmel tool and grind away some material.
The ledge is a non-critical area so the ginding doesn't have to be
pretty.

By the way I've often used VCR cleaner, diskette cleaner, and cassette
cleaner to clean off thermal compound. Two of the little bottles were
labeled 99.x% Isopropyl alcohol but the other don't list ingredients.
They all work great. Ordinary rubbing alcohol, which is usually 70%,
is nearly useless on some thermal compounds. Just makes a big mess.

Steve Sheppard
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Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
November 9, 2004 5:51:43 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

"phsstpok" <stephensheppard@hotmail.com> wrote
> By the way I've often used VCR cleaner, diskette cleaner, and cassette
> cleaner to clean off thermal compound. Two of the little bottles were
> labeled 99.x% Isopropyl alcohol but the other don't list ingredients.
> They all work great. Ordinary rubbing alcohol, which is usually 70%,
> is nearly useless on some thermal compounds. Just makes a big mess.
>
> Steve Sheppard\

You can buy 99% iso. at a pharmacy.

--
Ed Light

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MS Smiley :-\

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uce@ftc.gov
Thanks, robots.
November 10, 2004 1:08:31 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

Forgot to tell you, after I lap a heat sink I use soap, water, and a soft
bristle tooth brush to clean off the grit, dry it off with a blow dryer,
then use brake cleaner to remove any residual from the surface of the heat
sink. Before I apply any thermal paste material to the heat sink, I
slightly wipe the heat sink with a damp acetone covered coffee filter. I
clean of the cpu with acetone then alcohol using a coffee filter before
pulling out my hair trying to get a smooth even coat of thermal paste on the
core. Works great.

"James Hanley" <jameshanley39@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
news:930a4bf.0411082035.2734a243@posting.google.com...
>I bought an Akasa AK824 HSF for the AMD XP 3000+. The strange thing
> is that the step is almost non-existant, it is the correct length of
> 10mm, but it is less than 1mm in depth. That is not deep enough to
> step over the plastic thing that says "Socket 462". My other socket A
> heatsinks (on other computers) step over it fine, their steps are
> between 2-3mm in depth.
>
> After emailing akasa, saying that a step of less than 1mm isn't right.
> He said it was right.
>
> in AMD's document
> http://www.amd.com/us-en/assets/content_type/white_pape...
> it says that the step has to be 2mm
>
> Also, would any record cleaning or vcr cleaning fluid do in place of
> isopropyl alcohol 99% for cleaning a heatsink and processor?
> And would the cloth from a glasses case or any lens cloth be low lint
> enough?
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
November 10, 2004 8:03:22 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

stephensheppard@hotmail.com (phsstpok) wrote in message news:<1072813f.0411090819.541c9384@posting.google.com>...
> jameshanley39@yahoo.co.uk (James Hanley) wrote in message news:<930a4bf.0411082035.2734a243@posting.google.com>...
> > I bought an Akasa AK824 HSF for the AMD XP 3000+. The strange thing
> > is that the step is almost non-existant, it is the correct length of
> > 10mm, but it is less than 1mm in depth. That is not deep enough to
> > step over the plastic thing that says "Socket 462". My other socket A
> > heatsinks (on other computers) step over it fine, their steps are
> > between 2-3mm in depth.
> >
> > After emailing akasa, saying that a step of less than 1mm isn't right.
> > He said it was right.
> >
> > in AMD's document
> > http://www.amd.com/us-en/assets/content_type/white_pape...
> > it says that the step has to be 2mm
> >
> > Also, would any record cleaning or vcr cleaning fluid do in place of
> > isopropyl alcohol 99% for cleaning a heatsink and processor?
> > And would the cloth from a glasses case or any lens cloth be low lint
> > enough?
>
> Just took a quick look at all of my loose heatsinks (5). All have
> steps that are less than 1mm, barely so but less. I don't have any
> problems. They've all been installed at one time or another but none
> touch the ledge on the socket. Don't know why you are having
> clearence problems.
>
> If I were you I'd put some cheap silcone thermal compound on the ledge
> and the lip, not for thermal properties (LOL) but to see where you are
> getting contact problems. It cleans up easily and you can't hurt
> anything. Afterwards, use a Dremmel tool and grind away some material.
> The ledge is a non-critical area so the ginding doesn't have to be
> pretty.
>
> By the way I've often used VCR cleaner, diskette cleaner, and cassette
> cleaner to clean off thermal compound. Two of the little bottles were
> labeled 99.x% Isopropyl alcohol but the other don't list ingredients.
> They all work great. Ordinary rubbing alcohol, which is usually 70%,
> is nearly useless on some thermal compounds. Just makes a big mess.
>
> Steve Sheppard


thanks for that advice
I like the idea of using a dremyl, it sounds like fun, but I may just
buy a heatsink with a proper step.

The ledge above the processor is about 1mm, so it can't possibly be
cleared with a step that's less than 1mm or 0.5mm. It definitely
touches it, even before I've pushed it completely down and clipped it
on. So i'd have to do some DIY to make the ledge smaller or buy a HSF
with a bigger step - a step that actually meets the AMD spec of 2mm!
Neither of which are a problem.
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
November 10, 2004 11:04:28 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

On Tue, 09 Nov 2004 22:08:31 +0000, Rusty wrote:

> Forgot to tell you, after I lap a heat sink I use soap, water, and a soft
> bristle tooth brush to clean off the grit, dry it off with a blow dryer,
> then use brake cleaner to remove any residual from the surface of the heat
> sink. Before I apply any thermal paste material to the heat sink, I
> slightly wipe the heat sink with a damp acetone covered coffee filter. I
> clean of the cpu with acetone then alcohol using a coffee filter before
> pulling out my hair trying to get a smooth even coat of thermal paste on the
> core. Works great.
>
Well, most of the time I just spread the old stuff around a little before
I reinstall it. If it doesn't have enough, I just add a little more and
spread it around with my finger. That works great too.:-)
Mix it, match it, I don't care, doesn't matter.:-)

--
Abit KT7-Raid (KT133) Tbred B core CPU @2400MHz (24x100FSB)
http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
November 10, 2004 11:04:29 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

> Well, most of the time I just spread the old stuff around a little before
> I reinstall it. If it doesn't have enough, I just add a little more and
> spread it around with my finger. That works great too.:-)
> Mix it, match it, I don't care, doesn't matter.:-)

Gasp! And I was under the spell of the Arctic Silver instructions. They say
finger grease prevents heat transfer, and the arctic grease needs to break
in from fresh.


--
Ed Light

Smiley :-/
MS Smiley :-\

Send spam to the FTC at
uce@ftc.gov
Thanks, robots.
November 10, 2004 5:18:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

The best that I can determine, if you have a good copper heat sink such as a
thermaltake volcano 12 it will not make much of a difference (3°C max) if
you put your oily hands on it. Assuming that you have gotten the surfaces
clean. If you are using a cheap aluminum heat sink it makes a big
difference (5°C to 6°C). Done it both ways. The main thing is to make sure
that you have gotten a even THIN coat especially for a lapped heat sink.
Trapped air pockets between the heat sink and the cpu cause the biggest
temperature differential for any type of heat sink (I have managed to get
10°C temp dif) and yes I am currently with out a job and have way to much
idle time. :)  LOL :)  Interesting study though.

Video cards are really bad, the metal caps on the cards are generally
concave made of aluminum and don't transfer heat well. To top that off they
do not put enough thermal material under the heat sink or they use a pad. I
guess they are trying to shorten the life of the card and make them
replaceable or they just don't care about heat issues.

"Ed Light" <nobody@nobody.there> wrote in message
news:Qlnkd.92661$bk1.5728@fed1read05...
>> Well, most of the time I just spread the old stuff around a little before
>> I reinstall it. If it doesn't have enough, I just add a little more and
>> spread it around with my finger. That works great too.:-)
>> Mix it, match it, I don't care, doesn't matter.:-)
>
> Gasp! And I was under the spell of the Arctic Silver instructions. They
> say finger grease prevents heat transfer, and the arctic grease needs to
> break in from fresh.
>
>
> --
> Ed Light
>
> Smiley :-/
> MS Smiley :-\
>
> Send spam to the FTC at
> uce@ftc.gov
> Thanks, robots.
>
>
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
November 10, 2004 8:25:42 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

"Wes Newell" <w.newell@TAKEOUTverizon.net> wrote in message
news:p an.2004.11.10.08.04.18.372979@TAKEOUTverizon.net...
> On Tue, 09 Nov 2004 22:08:31 +0000, Rusty wrote:
>
>> Forgot to tell you, after I lap a heat sink I use soap, water, and a soft
>> bristle tooth brush to clean off the grit, dry it off with a blow dryer,
>> then use brake cleaner to remove any residual from the surface of the
>> heat
>> sink. Before I apply any thermal paste material to the heat sink, I
>> slightly wipe the heat sink with a damp acetone covered coffee filter. I
>> clean of the cpu with acetone then alcohol using a coffee filter before
>> pulling out my hair trying to get a smooth even coat of thermal paste on
>> the
>> core. Works great.
>>
> Well, most of the time I just spread the old stuff around a little before
> I reinstall it. If it doesn't have enough, I just add a little more and
> spread it around with my finger. That works great too.:-)
> Mix it, match it, I don't care, doesn't matter.:-)

I use a screw driver to spread it round - saves you having to wash your
hands after!
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
November 11, 2004 8:26:18 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

"Ed Light" <nobody@nobody.there> wrote in message news:<2Sbkd.92043$bk1.30369@fed1read05>...
> "phsstpok" <stephensheppard@hotmail.com> wrote
> > By the way I've often used VCR cleaner, diskette cleaner, and cassette
> > cleaner to clean off thermal compound. Two of the little bottles were
> > labeled 99.x% Isopropyl alcohol but the other don't list ingredients.
> > They all work great. Ordinary rubbing alcohol, which is usually 70%,
> > is nearly useless on some thermal compounds. Just makes a big mess.
> >
> > Steve Sheppard\
>
> You can buy 99% iso. at a pharmacy.

yeah, that's the proper way. It requires good technique though. I
went into 4 pharmacies last week, all said no. My mistake was in
asking people(women) at the counter. Then I used the right technique,
and got it after going into just 2 chemists!

I went in this week(second time round), ignored all women at the
counter, looked around for real chemists within the place. Out comes
an idiot businessmen pretending to be a chemist - he didn't have it,
so I asked if he could get it in. He said 'yes' and claimed he could
order in 99% isopropyl alcohol with 500ml water - not separate. He
gave up trying to sell that after I kept explaining to him that it
wouldn't be 99%. The second chemist I went in sold it straight away.
(I had tried that second chemist the week before, but spoke to the
woman at the counter who said they didn't have it). Also avoid large
chemists in britain. Only small chemists are real chemists, and
generally avoid asking anybody that is serving, especially if they're
old women or fit women - since they are not 'the chemists' thus only
know what is on the shelves.

Don't come to England!!
November 11, 2004 9:12:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

> thanks for that advice
> I like the idea of using a dremyl, it sounds like fun, but I may just
> buy a heatsink with a proper step.
>
> The ledge above the processor is about 1mm, so it can't possibly be
> cleared with a step that's less than 1mm or 0.5mm. It definitely
> touches it, even before I've pushed it completely down and clipped it
> on. So i'd have to do some DIY to make the ledge smaller or buy a HSF
> with a bigger step - a step that actually meets the AMD spec of 2mm!
> Neither of which are a problem.
You are going to have a hard time finding a heatsink with a step
larger than about 0.9 mm. I haven't seen the larger steps since the
Thunderbird/Morgan days.

By the way, what motherboard and CPU (core) are you using that you are
having so much trouble?

I've run into a few ill-fitting heatsinks, mostly because capacitors
are in the way. Personally, I find it easy to grind down a little
metal than to ship heatsinks. Most of mine I hand sand to a smooth
finish so grinding takes very little effort by comparison. Besides I
hate to return stuff. Some heatsinks that I didn't like I reused for
video cards or chopped up to make ramsinks. (Now that's a lot of
work).

Steve Sheppard
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
November 11, 2004 1:51:06 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

"James Hanley" <jameshanley39@yahoo.co.uk> wrote

> Only small chemists are real chemists, and
......
> Don't come to England!!

That's awful. Here in the US you can just buy it off the shelf. But Big
Brother is watching. Though I guess that's happening there too.
What's a "chemist?" Perhaps the person who makes up drug orders?

--
Ed Light

Smiley :-/
MS Smiley :-\

Send spam to the FTC at
uce@ftc.gov
Thanks, robots.
November 14, 2004 3:30:49 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

> That's awful. Here in the US you can just buy it off the shelf. But Big
> Brother is watching. Though I guess that's happening there too.
> What's a "chemist?" Perhaps the person who makes up drug orders?

In Oz, we usually call the shop the "Chemist" or occasionally a "Pharmacy"
but the guy that fills the perscription is usually called the "Chemist" and
occasionally the "Pharmacist".

I think in the US you call the shop a "Drug Store" and the guy a "Druggist".

Dave
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
November 14, 2004 3:30:50 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

"Dave" <dave2972@hotmail.com> wrote
> I think in the US you call the shop a "Drug Store" and the guy a
> "Druggist".
Yes, or Pharmacist.


--
Ed Light

Smiley :-/
MS Smiley :-\

Send spam to the FTC at
uce@ftc.gov
Thanks, robots.
!