how do you measure temperature

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

How does one measure temperature?
After reading a few messages, it would appear that the correct
software will talk to the processor.
My processor is an AMD Athlon XP 2000+.
I am running Fedora Core 3.
Thanks,
Charles
5 answers Last reply
More about measure temperature
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    I just found a web site that says there is a temperature sensitive
    diode on Intel processors, but NOT on AMD processors.

    Charles wrote:

    > How does one measure temperature?
    > After reading a few messages, it would appear that the correct
    > software will talk to the processor.
    > My processor is an AMD Athlon XP 2000+.
    > I am running Fedora Core 3.
    > Thanks,
    > Charles
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    Don't thing the 2000+ has a temp sensor.Barton core(2500+ and up,333,400
    FSB) might and AMD64 definitely does. Te older core AMD chips use a sensor
    built in to the socket on the motherboard. Not very accurate.
    "Charles" <charles97@dunjas.com> wrote in message
    news:421E26C2.519C50F2@dunjas.com...
    > I just found a web site that says there is a temperature sensitive
    > diode on Intel processors, but NOT on AMD processors.
    >
    > Charles wrote:
    >
    > > How does one measure temperature?
    > > After reading a few messages, it would appear that the correct
    > > software will talk to the processor.
    > > My processor is an AMD Athlon XP 2000+.
    > > I am running Fedora Core 3.
    > > Thanks,
    > > Charles
    >
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    On Thu, 24 Feb 2005 12:50:39 -0600, Charles wrote:

    > How does one measure temperature?

    Hmm... Meat probe.:-)

    > After reading a few messages, it would appear that the correct software
    > will talk to the processor.
    > My processor is an AMD Athlon XP 2000+. I am running Fedora Core 3.

    Find lm_sensors rpm.

    [wes@wes2 wes]$ sensors
    it87-isa-0290
    Adapter: ISA adapter
    VCore 1: +1.28 V (min = +1.12 V, max = +1.79 V)
    VCore 2: +1.50 V (min = +1.41 V, max = +1.70 V)
    +3.3V: +3.23 V (min = +2.98 V, max = +3.63 V)
    +5V: +4.97 V (min = +4.49 V, max = +5.51 V)
    +12V: +11.78 V (min = +10.82 V, max = +13.18 V)
    -12V: -11.35 V (min = -10.83 V, max = -13.19 V)
    -5V: -4.97 V (min = -4.54 V, max = -5.47 V)
    Stdby: +5.00 V (min = +4.49 V, max = +5.51 V)
    VBat: +3.14 V
    fan1: 2343 RPM (min = 0 RPM, div = 8)
    fan2: 2311 RPM (min = 0 RPM, div = 8)
    fan3: 0 RPM (min = 0 RPM, div = 8)
    CPU Temp: +29°C (low = +15°C, high = +55°C) sensor = diode
    M/B Temp: +25°C (low = 15°C, high = +40°C) sensor =thermistor

    Gkrellm if you want a graphical display too.

    --
    Abit KT7-Raid (KT133) Tbred B core CPU @2400MHz (24x100FSB)
    My server http://wesnewell.no-ip.com/cpu.php
    Verizon server http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    Charles wrote:
    > Charles wrote:
    >> How does one measure temperature?
    >> After reading a few messages, it would appear that the correct
    >> software will talk to the processor.
    >> My processor is an AMD Athlon XP 2000+.
    >> I am running Fedora Core 3.

    For Linux, you'll want the lmsensors package. It's not the easiest thing to
    get up and running on Debian, but FC3 should probably be a bit easier.
    There's various front-ends for lmsensors, though I can't remember any names
    off the top of my head.

    > I just found a web site that says there is a temperature sensitive
    > diode on Intel processors, but NOT on AMD processors.

    That web site is incorrect. The last AMD CPU to not have an internal
    temperature sensor was the 1400 Thunderbird. All Palomino, TBred, Barton,
    and A64 CPUs have internal temperature diodes (ie: all desktop CPUs with XP
    in their name). However, not all motherboards read the diode, many relying
    instead on a thermistor in the socket. The easy way to tell the difference
    between a socket and internal temperature measurement is that the internal
    measurement will instantly jump several degrees when you go from 0% to 100%
    load (eg: starting Prime95) whereas the socket sensor will take several
    seconds to change even a degree.

    Of course, due to differences in CPUs, motherboards, and BIOS revisions,
    absolute temperature measurements are useless. If person A has a lower
    temperature than person B, there is still a very good chance that person B's
    CPU is running cooler. Likewise, you cannot compare temperatures between
    different steppings, such as TBred vs Barton, let alone between the P4 and
    an Athlon. The only thing they are good for is seeing if changing a
    particular cooling component (such as moving a fan around) increases or
    decreases the CPU temperature.

    --
    Michael Brown
    www.emboss.co.nz : OOS/RSI software and more :)
    Add michael@ to emboss.co.nz - My inbox is always open
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    I just discovered that that the BIOS can measure the temperature.
    I started the computer in a cold room and immediately invoked the
    BIOS and the indicated temperature was 22C. That is believeable,
    since the room is about 70F. Then, over the next minute, it slowly
    rose, a degree at a time, to 27C.

    So the board and the BIOS both support temperature monitoring.

    Now to fetch an program to look at it outside of BIOS. Michael
    Brown has already suggested the lmsensors package. I will try
    that. And thanks to several others for their comments.
    Regards,
    Charles

    Charles wrote:

    > How does one measure temperature?
    > After reading a few messages, it would appear that the correct
    > software will talk to the processor.
    > My processor is an AMD Athlon XP 2000+.
    > I am running Fedora Core 3.
    > Thanks,
    > Charles
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