fan speed and noise reduction

Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

I am running an AMD Athlon XP 2000+
I think it is running at either 1.6 or 1.8 Ghz

In an effort to reduce noise, I removed the
factory fan/heatsink and replaced it with a
"Cooler Master X Dream II" which claims to
have less than 24dBA of noise.
I want to reduce the noise from my fan a
bit further.

The Zalman CMSP7000 is attractive and
cheap and quiet, but my CPU sits only two
inches below my power supply.

The fan on my CPU has three wires.
1. +5v
2. +12v
3. gnd

My question...
If I add a resistor in series with the +12v line,
would that reduce the fan speed?

Anybody know for certain?
Tnx,
Charles
12 answers Last reply
More about speed noise reduction
  1. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    Often, the fan does not need to run at full speed. If you board support fan
    speed control, you can use http://www.almico.com/speedfan.php. If your board
    is an MSI, you can use PC Alert 4 that reduces significantly the processor
    heat. It calls the HALT processor instruction that reduces power
    consumption. While you don't use CPU intensive application, the processor
    will stay cool, which is the case in email and Internet browsing. As for the
    resistor, I suggest using a variable resistor since it is not obvious to
    know for a specific resistor which speed the fan will run.


    Sylvain.


    "Charles" <charles97@dunjas.com> wrote in message
    news:423F27D4.63D087BD@dunjas.com...
    >I am running an AMD Athlon XP 2000+
    > I think it is running at either 1.6 or 1.8 Ghz
    >
    > In an effort to reduce noise, I removed the
    > factory fan/heatsink and replaced it with a
    > "Cooler Master X Dream II" which claims to
    > have less than 24dBA of noise.
    > I want to reduce the noise from my fan a
    > bit further.
    >
    > The Zalman CMSP7000 is attractive and
    > cheap and quiet, but my CPU sits only two
    > inches below my power supply.
    >
    > The fan on my CPU has three wires.
    > 1. +5v
    > 2. +12v
    > 3. gnd
    >
    > My question...
    > If I add a resistor in series with the +12v line,
    > would that reduce the fan speed?
    >
    > Anybody know for certain?
    > Tnx,
    > Charles
    >
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    On Mon, 21 Mar 2005 14:00:20 -0600, Charles wrote:

    > The fan on my CPU has three wires.
    > 1. +5v
    > 2. +12v
    > 3. gnd
    >
    It has 3 wires, but it doesn't have +5v. The third wire is for the fan
    speed.

    > My question...
    > If I add a resistor in series with the +12v line, would that reduce the
    > fan speed?
    >
    Yes.

    > Anybody know for certain?

    Yes.

    --
    Abit KT7-Raid (KT133) Tbred B core CPU @2400MHz (24x100FSB)
    My server http://wesnewell.no-ip.com/cpu.php
    Verizon server http://mysite.verizon.net/res0exft/cpu.htm
  3. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    Wes Newell wrote:

    > > Anybody know for certain?
    >
    > Yes.

    Wes,
    Can you guess the milliampere range.
    If I know the approximate milliamperes,
    I could guess a starting value for a resistor.

    umm... I suppose. If I am going to cut wires anyway,
    I should just put a milliamp meter in the circuit.
    (but I sometimes display the indications of laziness)
    Charles

    OBTW: I pulled the CPU fan connector one day
    to see if got warm. It took about 20 minutes for it
    to become warm to the touch.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    "Charles" <charles97@dunjas.com> wrote
    > Wes,
    > Can you guess the milliampere range.
    Should be on the fan.


    --
    Ed Light

    Smiley :-/
    MS Smiley :-\

    Send spam to the FTC at
    uce@ftc.gov
    Thanks, robots.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    "Charles" <charles97@dunjas.com> wrote in message
    news:423F8EFA.B3DF392D@dunjas.com...
    > Wes Newell wrote:
    >
    >> > Anybody know for certain?
    >>
    >> Yes.
    >
    > Wes,
    > Can you guess the milliampere range.
    > If I know the approximate milliamperes,
    > I could guess a starting value for a resistor.
    >
    > umm... I suppose. If I am going to cut wires anyway,
    > I should just put a milliamp meter in the circuit.
    > (but I sometimes display the indications of laziness)
    > Charles
    >
    > OBTW: I pulled the CPU fan connector one day
    > to see if got warm. It took about 20 minutes for it
    > to become warm to the touch.

    Or you could buy a rotary switch and some 1 amp diodes and use it to make a
    controller. I made one using 8 diodes and a 12 position rotary switch. The
    diodes were soldered in series to the output points on the switch and one
    end was hooked up to the 12V rail and the other to the fan. By rotating the
    switch, more diodes were added to the load and the voltage to the fan
    dropped as each of the diodes has about 0.75V drop.

    Diode switch output
    \ \
    --------|---|<----|----|<----|----|<----|----|<----|----
    | | | | |
    0 0 0 0 0
    | \
    | rotary switch outer
    poles
    0
    /
    rotary switch centre pole

    The above diagram should help. Imagine the line with the diodes is
    circular. I hooked it up with a wire from the centre pole of the rotary
    switch to the fan and the power wire to one end of the diode bus, depending
    if you cut the 12volt wire or the 0volt wire and insert it. If it doesn't
    work with the input wire on one end, attach it to the other. I've only
    shown 4 diodes but you can add more.

    I used a Molex y-adapter power cable and cut either the 12V (yellow) or the
    0V (black) wire (can't remember and am to lazy to work it out).

    It cost less than $5.00 all up.

    Dave
  6. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    Dave wrote:

    > Or you could buy a rotary switch and some 1 amp diodes and use it to make a
    > controller.

    Dave,
    I like it.
    Tnx,
    Charles
  7. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    Directron.com sells an inline adjustable fanspeed controller by Zalman for
    $4. Just get that, it works great.

    rms
  8. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    rms wrote:
    >
    > Directron.com sells an inline adjustable fanspeed controller by Zalman for
    > $4. Just get that, it works great.

    They also have one you can put in an empty pci cutout -- so you can
    adjust the volume externally via the back of the computer. If you want
    to plug it into a three pin, you'll have to get 4 to 3 pin converters,
    and so on, but it's a mighty spiffy solution if you don't mind the extra
    money -- prolly run around 40 or 50 bucks all said and done.

    Bryan

    > rms
  9. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    rms wrote:

    > Directron.com sells an inline adjustable fanspeed controller by Zalman for
    > $4. Just get that, it works great.
    >
    > rms

    rms,
    Cool alias. I once worked next to Robert L. Carrol.

    I found the Zalman at Fry's.
    I got DOUBLE lucky.
    They had it on sale for $3.90 !!!
    Anyway, I will try it.

    Plus...
    One more thing...
    Most of the fans that have current listed on the box
    fall in the range between .1 amp and .15 amp.

    Tnx,
    charles
  10. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    Charles wrote:

    > I am running an AMD Athlon XP 2000+
    > I think it is running at either 1.6 or 1.8 Ghz
    >
    > In an effort to reduce noise, I removed the
    > factory fan/heatsink and replaced it with a
    > "Cooler Master X Dream II" which claims to
    > have less than 24dBA of noise.
    > I want to reduce the noise from my fan a
    > bit further.
    >
    > The Zalman CMSP7000 is attractive and
    > cheap and quiet, but my CPU sits only two
    > inches below my power supply.
    >
    > The fan on my CPU has three wires.
    > 1. +5v
    > 2. +12v
    > 3. gnd
    >
    > My question...
    > If I add a resistor in series with the +12v line,
    > would that reduce the fan speed?
    >
    > Anybody know for certain?
    > Tnx,
    > Charles

    I stuck a pencil in each of the cpu and power supply fans.
    Guess where the major noise is coming from?
    The hard drive.
    All this time I thought it was the fans.
    Now I have to find a way to quiet the hard drive.
    Thanks to everybody for their suggestions.
    Charles
  11. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    A variable resistor (or a rheostat) is all that the Thermaltake fans
    use... that might be an idea... but you'll want to monitor your system
    temp as you trade off fan speed for silence... is that Cooler Master X
    Dream II a copper or aluminum heat sink?

    I've got a Zalman 7000Cu on my PVR machine @ home and I love it... but I
    also have a Thermaltake Silent Boost ($30 Cdn, or about $20-25 US
    probably) on my regular tower... being a full copper heat sink it
    doesn't need as much of a fan to dissipate the heat; the copper does a
    much better job than aluminum....

    anyways, hope you find a solution!
    jb

    Sylvain wrote:
    > Often, the fan does not need to run at full speed. If you board support fan
    > speed control, you can use http://www.almico.com/speedfan.php. If your board
    > is an MSI, you can use PC Alert 4 that reduces significantly the processor
    > heat. It calls the HALT processor instruction that reduces power
    > consumption. While you don't use CPU intensive application, the processor
    > will stay cool, which is the case in email and Internet browsing. As for the
    > resistor, I suggest using a variable resistor since it is not obvious to
    > know for a specific resistor which speed the fan will run.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Sylvain.
    >
    >
    > "Charles" <charles97@dunjas.com> wrote in message
    > news:423F27D4.63D087BD@dunjas.com...
    >
    >>I am running an AMD Athlon XP 2000+
    >>I think it is running at either 1.6 or 1.8 Ghz
    >>
    >>In an effort to reduce noise, I removed the
    >>factory fan/heatsink and replaced it with a
    >>"Cooler Master X Dream II" which claims to
    >>have less than 24dBA of noise.
    >>I want to reduce the noise from my fan a
    >>bit further.
    >>
    >>The Zalman CMSP7000 is attractive and
    >>cheap and quiet, but my CPU sits only two
    >>inches below my power supply.
    >>
    >>The fan on my CPU has three wires.
    >>1. +5v
    >>2. +12v
    >>3. gnd
    >>
    >>My question...
    >>If I add a resistor in series with the +12v line,
    >>would that reduce the fan speed?
    >>
    >>Anybody know for certain?
    >>Tnx,
    >>Charles
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
    >
  12. Archived from groups: alt.comp.hardware.overclocking.amd (More info?)

    If you're serious about silencing your hard drives I'd recommend the
    SilenX Luxurae HD Silencing System. Reviews @

    http://www.auphanonline.com/articles/view.php?article_id=1471
    http://www.overclockers.com/articles1177/

    SilenX's website (where you can order it direct from them if you can't
    find it locally):

    http://www.silenxusa.com/productcart/pc/configureprd_z.asp?idcategory=17&idproduct=46

    It's $39.95 US, plus another $13.95 if you buy their silent fan add-on
    (SilenX's silent fans are truly silent too; very sweet). Well worth the
    price though IMHO if you want a silent system...

    For a cheaper solution you could probably also check out this site:

    http://www.endpcnoise.com/cgi-bin/e/scan/st=db/co=yes/rf=%2A/fi=products/sf=category/op=eq/se=Hard%20Drive%20Enclosures.html

    The Nexus vibration dampeners might help... only $19.95 US, but I doubt
    they'd do anything nearly close to what the silenx hdss does...

    Anyways, good luck in the quest for silence... I've found that the more
    I spend trying to silence things, the lower my tolerance gets for any
    noise... doubt I'll ever be happy ;-)

    JB

    Charles wrote:
    > Charles wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I am running an AMD Athlon XP 2000+
    >>I think it is running at either 1.6 or 1.8 Ghz
    >>
    >>In an effort to reduce noise, I removed the
    >>factory fan/heatsink and replaced it with a
    >>"Cooler Master X Dream II" which claims to
    >>have less than 24dBA of noise.
    >>I want to reduce the noise from my fan a
    >>bit further.
    >>
    >>The Zalman CMSP7000 is attractive and
    >>cheap and quiet, but my CPU sits only two
    >>inches below my power supply.
    >>
    >>The fan on my CPU has three wires.
    >>1. +5v
    >>2. +12v
    >>3. gnd
    >>
    >>My question...
    >>If I add a resistor in series with the +12v line,
    >>would that reduce the fan speed?
    >>
    >>Anybody know for certain?
    >>Tnx,
    >>Charles
    >
    >
    > I stuck a pencil in each of the cpu and power supply fans.
    > Guess where the major noise is coming from?
    > The hard drive.
    > All this time I thought it was the fans.
    > Now I have to find a way to quiet the hard drive.
    > Thanks to everybody for their suggestions.
    > Charles
    >
    >
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